doctrine


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doc·trine

 (dŏk′trĭn)
n.
1. A principle or body of principles presented for acceptance or belief, as by a religious, political, scientific, or philosophic group; dogma.
2. A rule or principle of law, especially when established by precedent.
3. A statement of official government policy, especially in foreign affairs and military strategy.
4. Archaic Something taught; a teaching.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin doctrīna, from doctor, teacher; see doctor.]

doctrine

(ˈdɒktrɪn)
n
1. (Philosophy) a creed or body of teachings of a religious, political, or philosophical group presented for acceptance or belief; dogma
2. a principle or body of principles that is taught or advocated
[C14: from Old French, from Latin doctrīna teaching, from doctor see doctor]
doctrinal adj
doctrinality n
docˈtrinally adv
ˈdoctrinism n
ˈdoctrinist n

doc•trine

(ˈdɒk trɪn)

n.
1. a particular principle, position, or policy taught or advocated, as of a religion.
2. a body or system of teachings relating to a particular subject: the doctrine of a Church.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin doctrīna teaching =doct(o)r doctor + -īna -ine3]

doctrine

Fundamental principles by which the military forces or elements thereof guide their actions in support of national objectives. It is authoritative but requires judgment in application. See also multinational doctrine; joint doctrine; multi-Service doctrine.

Doctrine

 a body or set of principles or tenets; doctors collectively.
Examples: doctrine of comets, 1754; of instruments [laws], 1594; of doctors—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.doctrine - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or schooldoctrine - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
nuclear deterrence - the military doctrine that an enemy will be deterred from using nuclear weapons as long as he can be destroyed as a consequence; "when two nations both resort to nuclear deterrence the consequence could be mutual destruction"
belief - any cognitive content held as true
Cabalism, Kabbalism - the doctrines of the Kabbalah
abolitionism - the doctrine that calls for the abolition of slavery
absolutism - the doctrine of an absolute being
amoralism - the doctrine that moral distinctions are invalid
animalism - the doctrine that human beings are purely animal in nature and lacking a spiritual nature
animism - the doctrine that all natural objects and the universe itself have souls; "animism is common among primitive peoples"
antiestablishmentarianism, antiestablishmentism - the doctrine of opposition to the social and political establishment
asceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual state
contextualism - any doctrine emphasizing the importance of the context in solving problems or establishing the meaning of terms
creationism - the literal belief in the account of Creation given in the Book of Genesis; "creationism denies the theory of evolution of species"
credo, creed - any system of principles or beliefs
divine right, divine right of kings - the doctrine that kings derive their right to rule directly from God and are not accountable to their subjects; rebellion is the worst of political crimes; "the doctrine of the divine right of kings was enunciated by the Stuarts in Britain in the 16th century"
dogma - a doctrine or code of beliefs accepted as authoritative; "he believed all the Marxist dogma"
dualism - the doctrine that reality consists of two basic opposing elements, often taken to be mind and matter (or mind and body), or good and evil
dynamism - any of the various theories or doctrines or philosophical systems that attempt to explain the phenomena of the universe in terms of some immanent force or energy
epicureanism - a doctrine of hedonism that was defended by several ancient Greek philosophers
establishmentarianism, establishmentism - the doctrine of supporting the social or political establishment
ethicism - a doctrine that ethics and ethical ideas are valid and important; "his ethicism often led him to moralize"
expansionism - the doctrine of expanding the territory or the economic influence of a country
formalism - the doctrine that formal structure rather than content is what should be represented
functionalism - any doctrine that stresses utility or purpose
Girondism - the doctrine of the Girondists
gospel - a doctrine that is believed to be of great importance; "Newton's writings were gospel for those who followed"
gymnosophy - the doctrine of a sect of Hindu philosophers who practiced nudity and asceticism and meditation
imitation - the doctrine that representations of nature or human behavior should be accurate imitations
laissez faire, individualism - the doctrine that government should not interfere in commercial affairs
internationalism - the doctrine that nations should cooperate because their common interests are more important than their differences
unilateralism - the doctrine that nations should conduct their foreign affairs individualistically without the advice or involvement of other nations
irredentism, irridentism - the doctrine that irredenta should be controlled by the country to which they are ethnically or historically related
literalism - the doctrine of realistic (literal) portrayal in art or literature
majority rule, democracy - the doctrine that the numerical majority of an organized group can make decisions binding on the whole group
monism - the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
multiculturalism - the doctrine that several different cultures (rather than one national culture) can coexist peacefully and equitably in a single country
nationalism - the doctrine that your national culture and interests are superior to any other
nationalism - the doctrine that nations should act independently (rather than collectively) to attain their goals
nihilism - a revolutionary doctrine that advocates destruction of the social system for its own sake
pacificism, pacifism, passivism - the doctrine that all violence is unjustifiable
pluralism - the doctrine that reality consists of several basic substances or elements
populism - the political doctrine that supports the rights and powers of the common people in their struggle with the privileged elite
presentism - the doctrine that the Scripture prophecies of the Apocalypse (as in the Book of Revelations) are presently in the course of being fulfilled
freethinking, rationalism - the doctrine that reason is the right basis for regulating conduct

doctrine

noun teaching, principle, belief, opinion, article, concept, conviction, canon, creed, dogma, tenet, precept, article of faith the Marxist doctrine of perpetual revolution

doctrine

noun
A principle taught or advanced for belief, as by a religious or philosophical group:
Translations
مَذْهَب
doktrína
doktrin
doktriinioppi
tantantételvallási dogma
kenning; kenningakerfi
doktrinateorija
doktrīna, mācība
doktrína

doctrine

[ˈdɒktrɪn] Ndoctrina f

doctrine

[ˈdɒktrɪn] n
(= belief) → doctrine f
the doctrine of → la doctrine de
the doctrine that ... → la doctrine selon laquelle ...
(US) (= government policy) → politique f

doctrine

nDoktrin f, → Lehre f

doctrine

[ˈdɒktrɪn] ndottrina

doctrine

(ˈdoktrin) noun
a belief or set of beliefs which is taught. religious doctrines.
References in classic literature ?
This is the doctrine of truth, and most consoling and refreshing it is to the true believer.
It was impossible to have given less encouragement than he had done to such a doctrine, but if we had not had the doctrine to fall back upon we should have deprived each other of some of our finest exhibitions.
But if the doctrine of Fast-Fish be pretty generally applicable, the kindred doctrine of Loose-Fish is still more widely so.
After this we continued our journey, and as they got out of the cab our friend was saying, "My doctrine is this, that if we see cruelty or wrong that we have the power to stop, and do nothing, we make ourselves sharers in the guilt.
Here is an historical figure whom all men reverence and love, whom some regard as divine; and who was one of us--who lived our life, and taught our doctrine.
In fact, if not exactly a believer in the doctrine of the efficiency of the extra good works of saints, he really seemed somehow or other to fancy that his wife had piety and benevolence enough for two--to indulge a shadowy expectation of getting into heaven through her superabundance of qualities to which he made no particular pretension.
It was contrary to every doctrine of her's that difference of fortune should keep any couple asunder who were attracted by resemblance of disposition; and that Elinor's merit should not be acknowledged by every one who knew her, was to her comprehension impossible.
I heard her with wonder: I could not comprehend this doctrine of endurance; and still less could I understand or sympathise with the forbearance she expressed for her chastiser.
Extermination is good doctrine, my wife," said Defarge, rather troubled; "in general, I say nothing against it.
Chillip, - that the darker tyrant he has lately been, the more ferocious is his doctrine.
The whitewashed walls; the little pews where well-known figures entered with a subdued rustling, and where first one well-known voice and then another, pitched in a peculiar key of petition, uttered phrases at once occult and familiar, like the amulet worn on the heart; the pulpit where the minister delivered unquestioned doctrine, and swayed to and fro, and handled the book in a long accustomed manner; the very pauses between the couplets of the hymn, as it was given out, and the recurrent swell of voices in song: these things had been the channel of divine influences to Marner--they were the fostering home of his religious emotions--they were Christianity and God's kingdom upon earth.
Thus they win Great numbers of each Nation to receave With joy the tidings brought from Heav'n: at length Thir Ministry perform'd, and race well run, Thir doctrine and thir story written left, They die; but in thir room, as they forewarne, Wolves shall succeed for teachers, grievous Wolves, Who all the sacred mysteries of Heav'n To thir own vile advantages shall turne Of lucre and ambition, and the truth With superstitions and traditions taint, Left onely in those written Records pure, Though not but by the Spirit understood.