dodgy

(redirected from dodgier)
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Related to dodgier: high handed

dodg·y

 (dŏj′ē)
adj. dodg·i·er, dodg·i·est Chiefly British
1. Evasive; shifty.
2. Unsound, unstable, and unreliable.
3. So risky as to require very deft handling.

dodgy

(ˈdɒdʒɪ)
adj, dodgier or dodgiest
1. risky, difficult, or dangerous
2. uncertain or unreliable; tricky

dodg•y

(ˈdɒdʒ i)

adj. dodg•i•er, dodg•i•est. Chiefly Brit.
1. evasive or tricky.
2. risky; hazardous; chancy.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dodgy - of uncertain outcome; especially fraught with risk; "an extremely dicey future on a brave new world of liquid nitrogen, tar, and smog"- New Yorker
dangerous, unsafe - involving or causing danger or risk; liable to hurt or harm; "a dangerous criminal"; "a dangerous bridge"; "unemployment reached dangerous proportions"
2.dodgy - marked by skill in deception; "cunning men often pass for wise"; "deep political machinations"; "a foxy scheme"; "a slick evasive answer"; "sly as a fox"; "tricky Dick"; "a wily old attorney"
artful - marked by skill in achieving a desired end especially with cunning or craft; "the artful dodger"; "an artful choice of metaphors"

dodgy

adjective
1. (Brit., Austral., & N.Z) nasty, offensive, unpleasant, revolting, distasteful, repellent, unsavoury, obnoxious, repulsive, objectionable, repugnant He was a bit of a dodgy character.
2. (Brit., Austral., & N.Z) risky, difficult, tricky, dangerous, delicate, uncertain, problematic(al), unreliable, dicky (Brit. informal), dicey (informal, chiefly Brit.), ticklish, chancy (informal) Predicting voting trends is a dodgy business.
3. second rate, poor, inferior, mediocre, shoddy, low-grade, low-quality, substandard, for the birds (informal), pants (slang), end-of-the-pier (Brit. informal), rubbishy, piss-poor (slang), bush-league (Austral. & N.Z. informal), half-pie (N.Z. informal) cheap hotels and dodgy food
Translations
خَطِر، فيه مُجازَفَهغَيْر آمِن، غَيْر موثوق
obtížnýriskantní
risikabelsværusikker
rizikós
áhættusamur; vafasamurvafasamur

dodgy

[ˈdɒdʒɪ] ADJ (Brit) (dodgier (compar) (dodgiest (superl)))
1. (= dishonest) [person] → de poco fiar, poco fiable; [business, deal, district] → oscuro, chungo (Sp) ; [practice] → dudoso
there's something dodgy about himhay algo en él que me da mala espina
the whole business seemed a bit dodgytodo el asunto parecía un poco oscuro
2. (= unreliable, uncertain) [plan] → arriesgado; [weather] → inestable
the clutch is a bit dodgyel embrague no anda muy bien, el embrague está un poco chungo (Sp)
he's in a dodgy situation financiallysu situación económica es un poco peliaguda
the sausages looked dodgylas salchichas tenían una pinta sospechosa
to have a dodgy backtener la espalda fastidiada, estar fastidiado de la espalda
to have a dodgy heartestar fastidiado del corazón

dodgy

[ˈdɒdʒi] adj
(= uncertain) → douteux/euse
(= shady) [character] → louche; [deal] → louche
(= unsafe) → peu sûr(e)

dodgy

adj (Brit inf)
(= dubious, uncertain) personzweifelhaft, zwielichtig; deal, business, practiceszwielichtig; area, loanzweifelhaft; planunsicher; situationvertrackt (inf), → verzwickt (inf); weatherunbeständig; there’s something dodgy about himer ist nicht ganz koscher (inf); there’s something dodgy about this businessdie Sache ist nicht ganz astrein (inf); it’s a dodgy business (= uncertain)es ist eine unsichere Sache; he’s on dodgy grounder befindet sich auf unsicherem Boden
(= weak) back, heartschwach; (= damaged) tyre, car/boat etc partdefekt; he has a dodgy stomach from eating oysterser hat Austern gegessen und sich damit den Magen verdorben
(= near-the-knuckle) remarkanstößig

dodgy

[ˈdɒdʒɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (fam) (plan) → azzardato/a, rischioso/a; (deal) → sospetto/a, poco chiaro/a; (person) → losco/a
we're in a dodgy situation → navighiamo in cattive acque

dodge

(dodʒ) verb
to avoid (something) by a sudden and/or clever movement. She dodged the blow; He dodged round the corner out of sight; Politicians are very good at dodging difficult questions.
noun
1. an act of dodging.
2. a trick. You'll never catch him – he knows every dodge there is.
ˈdodgy adjective
1. difficult or risky. Catching the 5.15 train after the meeting will be rather dodgy.
2. (of a person, organization etc) not trustworthy or safe, financially or otherwise. I think the whole business sounds a bit dodgy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Penney looked much happier on the good pitch than in previous years on dodgier ones, and his 85, off 151 balls with 13 fours, was his county-best for three years.
I can imagine the tin-pot leaders of some of the dodgier African nations rubbing their hands in expectation of this newly announced hand-out.
Now he's been seen wearing a pair of even dodgier shades which look identical to the specs Daisy's pal Pixie Geldof has been seen out in this week.
Naturally all kinds of nastiness - as well as the scaly variety - are lurking in the undergrowth, including Hammond's nephew (Arliss Howard) with a hidden agenda and even dodgier English accent, and Pete Postlethwaite as a macho hunter out to bag a T-Rex.
The dodgy clothes, even dodgier hairdos, grating transatlantic twang and now she's telling her fans to go do drugs.
He'll get to don costumes even dodgier than the suit he wears as the Time Lord.
That is unless some of its dodgier dealings bring it down.
I said early on that England's chances of making the finals were dodgier than Scotland's.
Only a few fans want to talk about Scotland but days after the dust has settled at Ibrox, callers are still bemoaning dodgy referees and even dodgier defending while a striker continues to split opinion among the Rangers support.
But if anything, his appetite for pushing the boundaries of entertainment has increased - he just doesn't tell his 25-year-old missus about some of the dodgier scenes until they're done and dusted.
It all began as a bit of harmless fun, a chance to deride Turkey's dodgy harmonies and even dodgier hair-dos or Norway for yet again getting "nul points".
What is a far dodgier and more suspect is Ms Ciccone's insistence that Kabbalah should be taught in 'her' institutions.