dogmatism


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dog·ma·tism

 (dôg′mə-tĭz′əm, dŏg′-)
n.
Arrogant, stubborn assertion of opinion or belief.

dog•ma•tism

(ˈdɔg məˌtɪz əm, ˈdɒg-)

n.
dogmatic assertion in matters of opinion.
[1595–1605; < French < Late Latin]

dogmatism

1. a statement of a point of view as if it were an established fact.
2. the use of a system of ideas based upon insufficiently examined premises. — dogmatist, n.dogmatic, adj.
See also: Argumentation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dogmatism - the intolerance and prejudice of a bigot
intolerance - unwillingness to recognize and respect differences in opinions or beliefs

dogmatism

noun arrogance, presumption, arbitrariness, imperiousness, peremptoriness, dictatorialness, opinionatedness Dogmatism cannot stand in the way of progress.
Translations

dogmatism

[ˈdɒgmətɪzəm] Ndogmatismo m

dogmatism

[ˈdɒgmətɪzəm] ndogmatisme m

dogmatism

nDogmatismus m
References in classic literature ?
Rebecca had had to stand on a chair to reach them; now she could do it by stretching; and this is symbolic of the way in which she unconsciously scaled the walls of Miss Miranda's dogmatism and prejudice.
During the remainder of the journey the licentiate held forth to them on the excellences of the sword, with such conclusive arguments, and such figures and mathematical proofs, that all were convinced of the value of the science, and Corchuelo cured of his dogmatism.
There was nothing to object to in his intelligence but a little dogmatism maybe.
His gentleness was never tinged by dogmatism, and his instructions were given with an air of frankness and good nature that banished every idea of pedantry.
Their logomachy was far more stimulating to his intellect than the reserved and quiet dogmatism of Mr.
It has been often remarked that Descartes, having begun by dismissing all presuppositions, introduces several: he passes almost at once from scepticism to dogmatism.
Footnote: Macaulay's well-known essay on Bacon is marred by Macaulay's besetting faults of superficiality and dogmatism and is best left unread.
Let the claims and virtues of persons be never so great and welcome, the instinct of man presses eagerly onward to the impersonal and illimitable, and gladly arms itself against the dogmatism of bigots with this generous word out of the book itself.
And do you then believe," said the Doctor a little provoked by the dogmatism of his stubborn adversary, and perhaps, secretly, too confident in his own more liberal, though scarcely as profitable, attainments,--"do you then believe that all these beasts were literally collected in a garden, to be enrolled in the nomenclature of the first man?
What it fails to account for is the impact of its rulings that fan religious dogmatism and condone the misplaced vigilante-mob justice promulgated by giving a judicial berth to religious intolerance.
Externalism, Skepticism, and Skeptical Dogmatism, MARK WALKER
WITH her usual dogmatism, Pat Glass, Durham Labour MP, declares that "grammar schools widen inequality" and Chi Onwurah, Newcastle Labour MP, weighs in with "the solution [to social mobility] is not to go back to the 1950s", (both from The Journal of August 9).