dolerite


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Related to dolerite: pegmatite

dol·er·ite

 (dŏl′ə-rīt′)
n. Chiefly British
A dark, fine-grained igneous rock; diabase.

[French dolérite, from Greek doleros, deceitful (from its easily being mistaken for diorite), from dolos, trick; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

dol′er·it′ic (ə-rĭt′ĭk) adj.

dolerite

(ˈdɒləˌraɪt)
n
1. (Geological Science) a dark basic intrusive igneous rock consisting of plagioclase feldspar and a pyroxene, such as augite; often emplaced in dykes
2. (Geological Science) any dark igneous rock whose composition cannot be determined with the naked eye
[C19: from French dolérite, from Greek doleros deceitful; so called because of the difficulty of determining its composition]
doleritic adj

dol•er•ite

(ˈdɒl əˌraɪt)

n.
any of various dark igneous rocks of basaltic composition, as diabase.
[1830–40; < French dolérite < Greek doler(ós) deceitful (derivative of dólos wile) + French -ite -ite1]
dol`er•it′ic (-ˈrɪt ɪk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Blue Stane - a glacial rock made of dolerite - has been standing in St Andrews since the 16th century and is treated as a good-luck talisman.
Most of the land in the black desert is covered with dolerite, basalt and quartz stones; these stones give it its namesake color.
The dolerite is black, but weathers chocolate and buff, at places mottled, and contains pits.
5% ABV, available in 330ml bottles at the Gravity Station, Womanby Street, Cardiff The Bluestone Brewery of north Pembrokeshire, named after the Dolerite rocks of the area that were used to build the smaller stones of Stonehenge, is situated in Cilgwyn, in the foothills of the Preseli Mountains.
We caught pademelons peering at us from the side of the road, transfixed by the headlights; we walked across the oldest bridge in the continent; we stared at the magnificent 'organ pipes' dolerite formations of Mount Wellington, stirred by the knowledge that Charles Darwin had climbed that mountain nearly 200 years ago.
The Stonehenge bluestones are of volcanic and igneous rocks, the most common of which are called dolerite and rhyolite.
Quartz was identified as a source of fire-strikers, as was chert but not dolerite.
The rock formations found in the mountain range comprise sandstone, quartz sandstone and quartzite, along with igneous intrusions filled with basalt and dolerite.
The current study is aimed at correlating UCS with the sonic wave velocity (VP) of selected rock samples of dolerite from Kirana hills.
The occurrence of dolerite intrusions in the southern Baltic Sea was first reported in the 1980s after the drilling of two offshore oil exploration wells, D1-1 and C8-1 (Fig.
fourstar Oasis, from The sea cliff is said to resemble a kilt, with vertical basalt columns forming the pleats and intruded sills of dolerite forming the pattern.