dolmen


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Related to dolmen: cromlech

dol·men

 (dōl′mən, dŏl′-)
n.
A Neolithic tomb consisting of two or more upright stones with a capstone, believed to have been buried in earth except for a central opening.

[French (introduced in 1792 as a technical term by Théophile Malo de La Tour d'Auvergne-Corret, French soldier and antiquarian ), either from Cornish dolmen, form (with grammatical mutation of the initial consonant) of tolmen, dolmen, literally "hole of stone" (Cornish tol, hole (since people or animals can pass under a dolmen); akin to Welsh twll and Old Irish toll + Cornish men, stone; akin to Breton maen; see menhir), or from misinterpretation of Breton *daolvaen, form (with grammatical mutation of the initial consonant) of *taolvaen, literally, "table of stone" (Breton taol, table from Middle Breton, from Latin tabula, board + Breton maen, stone; see menhir).]

dolmen

(ˈdɒlmɛn)
n
1. (Archaeology) (in British archaeology) a Neolithic stone formation, consisting of a horizontal stone supported by several vertical stones, and thought to be a tomb
2. (Archaeology) (in French archaeology) any megalithic tomb
[C19: from French, probably from Old Breton tol table, from Latin tabula board + Breton mēn stone, of Celtic origin; see table]

dol•men

(ˈdoʊl mɛn, -mən, ˈdɒl-)

n.
a structure usu. regarded as a tomb, consisting of two or more large, upright stones set with a space between and capped by a horizontal stone.
[1855–60; < French < Cornish, variant (by lenition) of tolmen hole of stone (taken by French archaeologists to mean cromlech)]
dol•men′ic, adj.

dolmen

a construction consisting of two or more upright stones with a third on top, regarded by archaeologists as an ancient tomb or monument.
See also: Stones

dolmen

A Neolithic structure consisting of a large flat stone supported horizontally on two or more upright stones, thought to have been used as a tomb.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dolmen - a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstonedolmen - a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstone
megalith, megalithic structure - memorial consisting of a very large stone forming part of a prehistoric structure (especially in western Europe)
Translations

dolmen

[ˈdɒlmɛn] ndolmen m inv
References in classic literature ?
The Celtic dolmen and cromlech, the Etruscan tumulus, the Hebrew galgal, are words.
22) Moreover, had Davie remained at Trinity, he could have encouraged the upcoming Trinity poets--Mahon, Longley, Boland--to take Dolmen as the venue for their work.
The Dolmen mall branch remains open for extended banking hours during weekdays, as well being open throughout the weekend to service clients in and around the vicinity.
Most deal with the dolmens and passage graves, and the contemporary earth graves of the country.
Building a full-service sales and trading, research and advisory business in Ireland is an important step in our continued expansion, as Ronan and the team of talented, well-respected Dolmen professionals provide clients with the high quality service Cantor is known for, coupled with our world-class execution.
Archaeologists say as well as being a portal dolmen - a tomb made of giant stones - the standing stone was probably used as a ritual marker to guide communities through a "sacred landscape".
Mr Liam Miller of the Dolmen Press has not only stepped into the role that Maunsel played fifty years ago; he has gone further and secured world distribution for our literary wares.
It was observed that the dolmen and cist burials without circles (burials 4 and 6), are of an earlier date than those with a circle (burials 3, 5a and 5c).
The largest shopping mall in Karachi and one of the first mixed-use developments in the country, Dolmen Mall boasts approximately 160 high-end stores, restaurants and services.
Published by the Dolmen Press in 1975, the book was inspired by Joyce's visit to Mullingar while his father was engaged in clearing up irregularities in the electoral register for the area in 1900 and 1901.
24 papers address topics such as the Neolithic of the Cheshire Basin; the early Bronze Age on the Isle of Man; diversity & invisibility in late Neolithic Wales; rock art, identity, and death in the Early Bonze Age of Ireland & Britain; constructing the dolmen in southwest Wales; and cultural comparisons & social interpretations of Manx chambered cairns.
In fact close to Carlow town, you will find Europe's largest portal dolmen, its capstone weighing more than 100 tonnes.