domesticated


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do·mes·ti·cate

 (də-mĕs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. do·mes·ti·cat·ed, do·mes·ti·cat·ing, do·mes·ti·cates
1. To cause to feel comfortable at home; make domestic.
2. To adopt or make fit for domestic use or life.
3.
a. To train or adapt (an animal or plant) to live in a human environment and be of use to humans.
b. To introduce and accustom (an animal or plant) into another region; naturalize.
n. (-kət, -kāt′)
A plant or animal that has been adapted to live in a human environment.

do·mes′ti·ca′tion n.

domesticated

(dəˈmɛstɪˌkeɪtɪd)
adj
1. (Agriculture) (of animals or plants) brought or kept under control or cultivation
2. accustomed to home life
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.domesticated - converted or adapted to domestic use; "domestic animals"; "domesticated plants like maize"
tamed, tame - brought from wildness into a domesticated state; "tame animals"; "fields of tame blueberries"
2.domesticated - accustomed to home life; "some men think it unmanly to be domesticated; others find gratification in it"
domestic - of or involving the home or family; "domestic worries"; "domestic happiness"; "they share the domestic chores"; "everything sounded very peaceful and domestic"; "an author of blood-and-thunder novels yet quite domestic in his taste"

domesticated

adjective
1. tame, broken (in), trained, pet, tamed, house-trained (Brit.), house-broken (U.S.) our domesticated animals and plants
tame wild, savage, ferocious, unbroken, feral, untamed, undomesticated
2. home-loving, homely, domestic, housewifely, house-trained (jocular) I have never been very domesticated.
Translations
بارِع في الأعْمال البَيتِيَهمُدَجَّن
domáckýzdomácnělý
husligtæmmettam
házias
taminnvanur húsverkum
domáckyzdomácnený
evcilleştirilmişevcimen

domesticated

[dəˈmestɪkeɪtɪd] ADJ [animal] → domesticado; [person] → casero, hogareño

domesticated

[dəˈmɛstɪkeɪtɪd] adj
[animal] → domestiqué(e)
[person] to be domesticated [man] → être un homme d'intérieur; [woman] → être une femme d'intérieur
He's very domesticated → C'est un véritable homme d'intérieur.

domesticated

adj animal, speciesdomestiziert; personhäuslich

domesticated

[dəˈmɛstɪˌkeɪtɪd] adj (animal) → addomesticato/a; (person) → casalingo/a

domestic

(dəˈmestik) adjective
1. of or in the house or home. a domestic servant; domestic utensils.
2. concerning one's private life or family. domestic problems.
3. (of animals) tame and living with or used by people.
4. not foreign. the Government's domestic policy.
doˈmesticated (-keitid) adjective
1. (of animals) accustomed to living near and being used by people. Cows and sheep have been domesticated for many thousands of years.
2. good at doing jobs associated with running a house. My husband has become very domesticated since I've been ill.
doˌmestiˈcation noun
domesticity (doumeˈstisəti) noun
(fondness for) home life.
domestic help
(a person paid to give) assistance with housework etc.
References in classic literature ?
Duncan, who knew that the animal was often domesticated among the Indians, followed the example of his companion, believing that some favorite of the tribe had found its way into the thicket, in search of food.
Like household dogs they came snuffling round us, right up to our gunwales, and touching them; till it almost seemed that some spell had suddenly domesticated them.
He had the reputation of being a clever man, had been there some three months waiting for his trial to come on, and would have to wait as much longer; but he was quite domesticated and contented, since he got his board for nothing, and thought that he was well treated.
Habitations, fences, domesticated animals, men, women, children, and the soil that bore them--all worn out.
From the moment that I had come in contact with the red inhabitants of Mars I had noticed that Woola drew a great amount of unwelcome attention to me, since the huge brute belonged to a species which is never domesticated by the red men.
No mammal, except man, has such a quantity of brain matter; they are also capable of receiving a certain amount of education, are easily domesticated, and I think, with other naturalists, that if properly taught they would be of great service as fishing-dogs.
The elephant, which its owner had reared, not for a beast of burden, but for warlike purposes, was half domesticated.
His airy gayety, coming to him from a thousand sources, communicated itself to the family, and Ilbrahim was like a domesticated sunbeam, brightening moody countenances, and chasing away the gloom from the dark corners of the cottage.
These learned tourists generally obtain the greater part of their information from retired old South-Sea rovers, who have domesticated themselves among the barbarous tribes of the Pacific.
When it reached the house it domesticated itself at once, and became immediately a great favorite with my wife.
Perhaps you are not so much aware as I am of the mischief that may, of the unpleasantness that must arise from a young man's being received in this manner: domesticated among us; authorised to come at all hours, and placed suddenly on a footing which must do away all restraints.
The singular appearance of the cameleopard and the head of a man, has, it seems, given offence to the notions of propriety entertained, in general, by the wild animals domesticated in the city.