dominant


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Related to dominant: dominant gene

dom·i·nant

 (dŏm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1.
a. Exercising the most power, control, or influence: the dominant nations during the Cold War.
b. Most abundant or conspicuous; predominant: "[The fireplaces'] shallow brick arches are a relief from the dominant squares and verticals of the windows and doors" (Stephen A. Kliment).
2. Higher; overlooking: dominant hills.
3. Tending to be stronger than its counterpart or used for the most important tasks or in the most pressing situations: Which is your dominant eye? Throw the ball with your dominant arm.
4. Genetics Of, relating to, or being an allele that produces the same phenotypic effect in heterozygotes as in homozygotes.
5. Ecology Of, relating to, or being a species that is most characteristic of an ecological community and usually determines the presence, abundance, and type of other species.
6. Music Relating to or based on the fifth tone of a diatonic scale.
n.
1. Genetics A dominant allele or a trait produced by a dominant allele.
2. Ecology A dominant species.
3. Music The fifth tone of a diatonic scale.

[Middle English dominaunt, from Old French, from Latin domināns, dominant-, present participle of dominārī, to dominate; see dominate.]

dom′i·nant·ly adv.

dominant

(ˈdɒmɪnənt)
adj
1. having primary control, authority, or influence; governing; ruling
2. predominant or primary: the dominant topic of the day.
3. occupying a commanding position
4. (Genetics) genetics
a. (of an allele) producing the same phenotype in the organism irrespective of whether the allele of the same gene is identical or dissimilar
b. (of a character) controlled by such a gene
Compare recessive2
5. (Music, other) music of or relating to the fifth degree of a scale
6. (Environmental Science) ecology (of a plant or animal species within a community) more prevalent than any other species and determining the appearance and composition of the community
n
7. (Genetics) genetics
a. a dominant allele or character
b. an organism having such an allele or character
8. (Music, other) music
a. the fifth degree of a scale and the second in importance after the tonic
b. a key or chord based on this
9. (Environmental Science) ecology a dominant plant or animal in a community
ˈdominantly adv

dom•i•nant

(ˈdɒm ə nənt)

adj.
1. ruling or controlling; having or exerting authority.
2. occupying a commanding or elevated position.
3. predominant; chief or foremost.
4. Genetics.
a. of or pertaining to that allele of a gene pair that masks the effect of the other when both are present in the same cell or organism.
b. of or pertaining to the hereditary trait determined by such an allele.
5. pertaining to or based on the dominant in music.
n.
6. Genetics.
a. the dominant allele of a gene pair.
b. the individual carrying such an allele.
c. a dominant trait.
Compare recessive (def. 3).
7. the fifth tone of a diatonic scale.
8. Ecol. any plant or sometimes animal that by virtue of its abundance, size, or habits exerts such an influence on the conditions of an area as to determine what other organisms can live there.
[1525–35; < Latin dominant-]
dom′i•nant•ly, adv.
syn: dominant, predominant, paramount describe something outstanding or supreme. dominant applies to something that exerts control or influence: the dominant powers at an international conference. predominant applies to something that is foremost at a specific time: English is one of the world's predominant languages. paramount refers to something that is first in rank or order: Safety is of paramount importance.

dom·i·nant

(dŏm′ə-nənt)
1. Relating to the form of a gene that expresses a trait, such as hair color, in an individual organism. The dominant form of a gene suppresses the counterpart, or recessive, form located on the other of a pair of chromosomes. See more at inheritance. Compare recessive.
2. Being a species that has the greatest effect on other species within its ecological community. For example, in a forest where tall oaks are dominant, the shade they create and the acorns they produce help to determine what other species can thrive there.

dominant

In genetics, used to describe a trait or gene that suppresses expression of its paired trait or gene.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dominant - (music) the fifth note of the diatonic scale
musical note, note, tone - a notation representing the pitch and duration of a musical sound; "the singer held the note too long"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
2.dominant - an allele that produces the same phenotype whether its paired allele is identical or different
allele, allelomorph - (genetics) either of a pair (or series) of alternative forms of a gene that can occupy the same locus on a particular chromosome and that control the same character; "some alleles are dominant over others"
Adj.1.dominant - exercising influence or control; "television plays a dominant role in molding public opinion"; "the dominant partner in the marriage"
superior - of or characteristic of high rank or importance; "a superior ruler"
subordinate, low-level - lower in rank or importance
2.dominant - (of genes) producing the same phenotype whether its allele is identical or dissimilar
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
recessive - (of genes) producing its characteristic phenotype only when its allele is identical
3.dominant - most frequent or common; "prevailing winds"
frequent - coming at short intervals or habitually; "a frequent guest"; "frequent complaints"

dominant

adjective
3. assertive, confident, forceful, decided, firm, demanding, forward, can-do (informal), positive, decisive, insistent, feisty (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), pushy (informal), in-your-face (Brit. slang), strong-willed, domineering, overbearing, self-assured He comes across as such a dominant personality

dominant

adjective
1. Exercising controlling power or influence:
2. Exercising authority:
3. Having preeminent significance:
Translations
مُسَيْطِر، غالِب
dominantadominantní
dominantdominerende
ríkjandi, ráîandi, mest áberandi
daryti poveikįstūksotiviešpataujantisviešpatavimasvyraujantis
dominējošsvaldošs
prevladujoč
egemenhâkimhükmeden

dominant

[ˈdɒmɪnənt]
A. ADJ
1. (= supremely powerful) [person, factor, role] → dominante
Britain was once dominant in the world marketGran Bretaña fue en su día una nación dominante en el mercado mundial
2. (= predominant) [feature, theme] → predominante
3. (Bio, Ecol) [gene, species, male] → dominante
4. (Mus) → dominante
dominant seventhséptima f dominante
B. N (Mus) → dominante f

dominant

[ˈdɒmɪnənt] adj
(= pre-eminent) [position, figure] → dominant(e)
(BIOLOGY) [gene] → dominant(e)

dominant

adj
person, role, class, featuredominierend; partner, figure, position, issue, personalitydominierend, beherrschend; nation, culture, ideology, species, trend, themedominierend, vorherrschend; genedominant; the dominant factorder wichtigste or dominierende Faktor; to be dominant or the dominant force in somethingetw dominieren; they are dominant in the world marketsie beherrschen den Weltmarkt; dominant male (animal) → männliches Leittier; (fig hum, man) → Platzhirsch m
(Mus) → dominant; dominant seventhDominantseptakkord m
n
(Biol) → dominantes Gen
(Mus) → Dominante f

dominant

[ˈdɒmɪnənt] adj (gen) (Mus) → dominante; (influence) → predominante

dominant

(ˈdominənt) adjective
ruling; most important; strongest. the dominant group in society; Green was the dominant colour in the room.
ˈdominance noun
ˈdominate (-neit) verb
1. to have command or influence (over). The stronger man dominates the weaker.
2. to be most strong or most noticeable etc (in). The skyline is dominated by the castle.
ˌdomiˈnation noun

dom·i·nant

a. dominante, característica primordial;
___ characteristicscaracterísticas ___ -s, con tendencia a heredarse;
___ factorfactor ___.

dominant

adj dominante; — gene (hand, hemisphere, etc.) gen (mano, hemisferio, etc.) dominante
References in classic literature ?
If his ideas were occasionally too clever, and not always consistent with a high sense of honor, she was none the less interested to know the ethics of that world of speculation into which her father had plunged, and the more convinced, with mingled sense of pride and anxiety, that his still dominant gentlemanhood would prevent his coping with it on equal terms.
The dominant spirit, however, that haunts this enchanted region, and seems to be commander-in-chief of all the powers of the air, is the apparition of a figure on horseback, without a head.
There seems to be something hypnotic about this, with its endlessly recurring dominant.
Nowhere is conscience so dominant and all-absorbing as with New England women.
The days went on, and Miranda grew stronger and stronger; her will seemed unassailable, and before long she could be moved into a chair by the window, her dominant thought being to arrive at such a condition of improvement that the doctor need not call more than once a week, instead of daily; thereby diminishing the bill, that was mount- ing to such a terrifying sum that it haunted her thoughts by day and dreams by night.
Haunted day and night by the one dominant idea that now possessed her, she leaped all logical difficulties at a bound, and at once associated the suspicion of a secret proceeding on the admiral's part with the kindred suspicion which pointed to him as the depositary of the Secret Trust.
As to the men and women, their choice on earth was stated in the prospect--Life on the lowest terms that could sustain it, down in the little village under the mill; or captivity and Death in the dominant prison on the crag.
The tormenting humour which was dominant there stopped them both.
It was an unhappy life that I lived, and its one dominant anxiety, towering over all its other anxieties like a high mountain above a range of mountains, never disappeared from my view.
He was a gentleman, and he hated him for that, hated him through some curious race-instinct for which he could not account, and which for that reason was all the more dominant within him.
Roque Guinart at once perceived that Don Quixote's weakness was more akin to madness than to swagger; and though he had sometimes heard him spoken of, he never regarded the things attributed to him as true, nor could he persuade himself that such a humour could become dominant in the heart of man; he was extremely glad, therefore, to meet him and test at close quarters what he had heard of him at a distance; so he said to him, "Despair not, valiant knight, nor regard as an untoward fate the position in which thou findest thyself; it may be that by these slips thy crooked fortune will make itself straight; for heaven by strange circuitous ways, mysterious and incomprehensible to man, raises up the fallen and makes rich the poor.
A man ruined by the First Consul interested the town of Alencon, to which he now returned, where royalism was secretly dominant.