don


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don 1

 (dŏn)
n.
1. Don (also dōn) Used as a courtesy title before the name of a man in a Spanish-speaking area.
2. Chiefly British
a. A head, tutor, or fellow at a college of Oxford or Cambridge.
b. A college or university professor.
3. The leader of an organized-crime family.
4. Archaic An important personage.

[Spanish dialectal and Italian, both from Latin dominus, lord; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

don 2

 (dŏn)
tr.v. donned, don·ning, dons
1. To put on (clothing or an ornament, for example): donned long gloves for the costume party; don clown make-up for the performance.
2. To assume or take on: donned the air of the injured party.

[Middle English, contraction of do on, to put on; see do1.]

don

(dɒn)
vb, dons, donning or donned
(Clothing & Fashion) (tr) to put on (clothing)
[C14: from do1 + on; compare doff]

don

(dɒn)
n
1. (Education) Brit a member of the teaching staff at a university or college, esp at Oxford or Cambridge
2. (Education) the head of a student dormitory at certain Canadian universities and colleges
3. a Spanish gentleman or nobleman
4. (in the Mafia) the head of a family
[C17: ultimately from Latin dominus lord]

Don

(dɒn; Spanish don)
n
a Spanish title equivalent to Mr: placed before a name to indicate respect
[C16: via Spanish, from Latin dominus lord; see don2]

Don

(dɒn)
n
1. (Placename) a river rising in W Russia, southeast of Tula and flowing generally south, to the Sea of Azov: linked by canal to the River Volga. Length: 1870 km (1162 miles)
2. (Placename) a river in NE Scotland, rising in the Cairngorm Mountains and flowing east to the North Sea. Length: 100 km (62 miles)
3. (Placename) a river in N central England, rising in S Yorkshire and flowing northeast to the Humber. Length: about 96 km (60 miles)

don1

(dɒn; Sp., It. dɔn)

n.
1. (cap.) Mr.; Sir: a Spanish title prefixed to a man's given name.
2. (in Spanish-speaking countries) a lord or gentleman.
3. (cap.) an Italian title of address, esp. for a priest.
4. (in the English universities) a head, fellow, or tutor of a college.
5. the head of a Mafia family.
6. Archaic. a person of great importance.
[1515–25; < Sp, Italian < Latin dominus]

don2

(dɒn)

v.t. donned, don•ning.
to put on or dress in: to don one's gloves.
[1560–70; contraction of do1 + on; compare doff]

Don

(dɒn)

n.
a river flowing generally S from Tula in the Russian Federation in Europe to the Sea of Azov. ab. 1200 mi. (1930 km) long.

don


Past participle: donned
Gerund: donning

Imperative
don
don
Present
I don
you don
he/she/it dons
we don
you don
they don
Preterite
I donned
you donned
he/she/it donned
we donned
you donned
they donned
Present Continuous
I am donning
you are donning
he/she/it is donning
we are donning
you are donning
they are donning
Present Perfect
I have donned
you have donned
he/she/it has donned
we have donned
you have donned
they have donned
Past Continuous
I was donning
you were donning
he/she/it was donning
we were donning
you were donning
they were donning
Past Perfect
I had donned
you had donned
he/she/it had donned
we had donned
you had donned
they had donned
Future
I will don
you will don
he/she/it will don
we will don
you will don
they will don
Future Perfect
I will have donned
you will have donned
he/she/it will have donned
we will have donned
you will have donned
they will have donned
Future Continuous
I will be donning
you will be donning
he/she/it will be donning
we will be donning
you will be donning
they will be donning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been donning
you have been donning
he/she/it has been donning
we have been donning
you have been donning
they have been donning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been donning
you will have been donning
he/she/it will have been donning
we will have been donning
you will have been donning
they will have been donning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been donning
you had been donning
he/she/it had been donning
we had been donning
you had been donning
they had been donning
Conditional
I would don
you would don
he/she/it would don
we would don
you would don
they would don
Past Conditional
I would have donned
you would have donned
he/she/it would have donned
we would have donned
you would have donned
they would have donned

don

A lecturer at a British university or college, especially at Oxford or Cambridge.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.don - a Spanish gentleman or noblemanDon - a Spanish gentleman or nobleman  
Spanish - the Romance language spoken in most of Spain and the countries colonized by Spain
gentleman - a man of refinement
2.don - teacher at a university or college (especially at Cambridge or Oxford)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
instructor, teacher - a person whose occupation is teaching
3.don - the head of an organized crime familydon - the head of an organized crime family
chief, top dog, head - a person who is in charge; "the head of the whole operation"
4.Don - Celtic goddess; mother of Gwydion and Arianrhod; corresponds to Irish Danu
Cambria, Cymru, Wales - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; during Roman times the region was known as Cambria
5.Don - a European river in southwestern Russia; flows into the Sea of Azov
Russian Federation, Russia - a federation in northeastern Europe and northern Asia; formerly Soviet Russia; since 1991 an independent state
6.Don - a Spanish courtesy title or form of address for men that is prefixed to the forename; "Don Roberto"
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
Spanish - the Romance language spoken in most of Spain and the countries colonized by Spain
Verb1.don - put clothing on one's bodydon - put clothing on one's body; "What should I wear today?"; "He put on his best suit for the wedding"; "The princess donned a long blue dress"; "The queen assumed the stately robes"; "He got into his jeans"
dress, get dressed - put on clothes; "we had to dress quickly"; "dress the patient"; "Can the child dress by herself?"
hat - put on or wear a hat; "He was unsuitably hatted"
try on, try - put on a garment in order to see whether it fits and looks nice; "Try on this sweater to see how it looks"
scarf - wrap in or adorn with a scarf
slip on - put on with ease or speed; "slip into something more comfortable after work"; "slip on one's shoes"

don

1
verb put on, get into, dress in, pull on, change into, get dressed in, clothe yourself in, slip on or into The police donned riot gear.

don

2
noun lecturer, professor, fellow, academic, scholar The train was full of university dons.

don

verb
To put (an article of clothing) on one's person:
Translations
Donpukeutuasonnustautua

don

1 [dɒn] N
1. (Brit) (Univ) → catedrático/a m/f
2. (US) a Mafia donun capo de la Mafia

don

2 [dɒn] VT (liter) [+ garment] → ponerse, ataviarse con

don

[ˈdɒn]
n (British)professeur mf d'université(professeure f d'université)
vt (= put on) [+ hat, coat] → revêtir

don

2
vt garmentanziehen, anlegen (dated); hataufsetzen

don

1 [dɒn] n (Brit) (Univ) → docente m/f universitario/a

don

2 [dɒn] vt (old) (garment) → indossare
References in classic literature ?
At this point they came in sight of thirty forty windmills that there are on plain, and as soon as Don Quixote saw them he said to his squire, "Fortune is arranging matters for us better than we could have shaped our desires ourselves, for look there, friend Sancho Panza, where thirty or more monstrous giants present themselves, all of whom I mean to engage in battle and slay, and with whose spoils we shall begin to make our fortunes; for this is righteous warfare, and it is God's good service to sweep so evil a breed from off the face of the earth.
It is easy to see," replied Don Quixote, "that thou art not used to this business of adventures; those are giants; and if thou art afraid, away with thee out of this and betake thyself to prayer while I engage them in fierce and unequal combat.
A slight breeze at this moment sprang up, and the great sails began to move, seeing which Don Quixote exclaimed, "Though ye flourish more arms than the giant Briareus, ye have to reckon with me.
Hush, friend Sancho," replied Don Quixote, "the fortunes of war more than any other are liable to frequent fluctuations; and moreover I think, and it is the truth, that that same sage Friston who carried off my study and books, has turned these giants into mills in order to rob me of the glory of vanquishing them, such is the enmity he bears me; but in the end his wicked arts will avail but little against my good sword.
God order it as he may," said Sancho Panza, and helping him to rise got him up again on Rocinante, whose shoulder was half out; and then, discussing the late adventure, they followed the road to Puerto Lapice, for there, said Don Quixote, they could not fail to find adventures in abundance and variety, as it was a great thoroughfare.
That is the truth," said Don Quixote, "and if I make no complaint of the pain it is because knights-errant are not permitted to complain of any wound, even though their bowels be coming out through it.
Finally they passed the night among some trees, from one of which Don Quixote plucked a dry branch to serve him after a fashion as a lance, and fixed on it the head he had removed from the broken one.
Here, brother Sancho Panza," said Don Quixote when he saw it, "we may plunge our hands up to the elbows in what they call adventures; but observe, even shouldst thou see me in the greatest danger in the world, thou must not put a hand to thy sword in my defence, unless indeed thou perceivest that those who assail me are rabble or base folk; for in that case thou mayest very properly aid me; but if they be knights it is on no account permitted or allowed thee by the laws of knighthood to help me until thou hast been dubbed a knight.
That I grant," said Don Quixote, "but in this matter of aiding me against knights thou must put a restraint upon thy natural impetuosity.
The friars, though going the same road, were not in her company; but the moment Don Quixote perceived them he said to his squire, "Either I am mistaken, or this is going to be the most famous adventure that has ever been seen, for those black bodies we see there must be, and doubtless are, magicians who are carrying off some stolen princess in that coach, and with all my might I must undo this wrong.
I have told thee already, Sancho," replied Don Quixote, "that on the subject of adventures thou knowest little.
The friars drew rein and stood wondering at the appearance of Don Quixote as well as at his words, to which they replied, "Senor Caballero, we are not devilish or unnatural, but two brothers of St.