don


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don 1

 (dŏn)
n.
1. Don (also dōn) Used as a courtesy title before the name of a man in a Spanish-speaking area.
2. Chiefly British
a. A head, tutor, or fellow at a college of Oxford or Cambridge.
b. A college or university professor.
3. The leader of an organized-crime family.
4. Archaic An important personage.

[Spanish dialectal and Italian, both from Latin dominus, lord; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

don 2

 (dŏn)
tr.v. donned, don·ning, dons
1. To put on (clothing).
2. To assume or take on: donned the air of the injured party.

[Middle English, contraction of do on, to put on; see do1.]

don

(dɒn)
vb, dons, donning or donned
(Clothing & Fashion) (tr) to put on (clothing)
[C14: from do1 + on; compare doff]

don

(dɒn)
n
1. (Education) Brit a member of the teaching staff at a university or college, esp at Oxford or Cambridge
2. (Education) the head of a student dormitory at certain Canadian universities and colleges
3. a Spanish gentleman or nobleman
4. (in the Mafia) the head of a family
[C17: ultimately from Latin dominus lord]

Don

(dɒn; Spanish don)
n
a Spanish title equivalent to Mr: placed before a name to indicate respect
[C16: via Spanish, from Latin dominus lord; see don2]

Don

(dɒn)
n
1. (Placename) a river rising in W Russia, southeast of Tula and flowing generally south, to the Sea of Azov: linked by canal to the River Volga. Length: 1870 km (1162 miles)
2. (Placename) a river in NE Scotland, rising in the Cairngorm Mountains and flowing east to the North Sea. Length: 100 km (62 miles)
3. (Placename) a river in N central England, rising in S Yorkshire and flowing northeast to the Humber. Length: about 96 km (60 miles)

don1

(dɒn; Sp., It. dɔn)

n.
1. (cap.) Mr.; Sir: a Spanish title prefixed to a man's given name.
2. (in Spanish-speaking countries) a lord or gentleman.
3. (cap.) an Italian title of address, esp. for a priest.
4. (in the English universities) a head, fellow, or tutor of a college.
5. the head of a Mafia family.
6. Archaic. a person of great importance.
[1515–25; < Sp, Italian < Latin dominus]

don2

(dɒn)

v.t. donned, don•ning.
to put on or dress in: to don one's gloves.
[1560–70; contraction of do1 + on; compare doff]

Don

(dɒn)

n.
a river flowing generally S from Tula in the Russian Federation in Europe to the Sea of Azov. ab. 1200 mi. (1930 km) long.

don


Past participle: donned
Gerund: donning

Imperative
don
don
Present
I don
you don
he/she/it dons
we don
you don
they don
Preterite
I donned
you donned
he/she/it donned
we donned
you donned
they donned
Present Continuous
I am donning
you are donning
he/she/it is donning
we are donning
you are donning
they are donning
Present Perfect
I have donned
you have donned
he/she/it has donned
we have donned
you have donned
they have donned
Past Continuous
I was donning
you were donning
he/she/it was donning
we were donning
you were donning
they were donning
Past Perfect
I had donned
you had donned
he/she/it had donned
we had donned
you had donned
they had donned
Future
I will don
you will don
he/she/it will don
we will don
you will don
they will don
Future Perfect
I will have donned
you will have donned
he/she/it will have donned
we will have donned
you will have donned
they will have donned
Future Continuous
I will be donning
you will be donning
he/she/it will be donning
we will be donning
you will be donning
they will be donning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been donning
you have been donning
he/she/it has been donning
we have been donning
you have been donning
they have been donning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been donning
you will have been donning
he/she/it will have been donning
we will have been donning
you will have been donning
they will have been donning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been donning
you had been donning
he/she/it had been donning
we had been donning
you had been donning
they had been donning
Conditional
I would don
you would don
he/she/it would don
we would don
you would don
they would don
Past Conditional
I would have donned
you would have donned
he/she/it would have donned
we would have donned
you would have donned
they would have donned

don

A lecturer at a British university or college, especially at Oxford or Cambridge.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.don - a Spanish gentleman or noblemanDon - a Spanish gentleman or nobleman  
Spanish - the Romance language spoken in most of Spain and the countries colonized by Spain
gentleman - a man of refinement
2.don - teacher at a university or college (especially at Cambridge or Oxford)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
instructor, teacher - a person whose occupation is teaching
3.don - the head of an organized crime familydon - the head of an organized crime family
chief, top dog, head - a person who is in charge; "the head of the whole operation"
4.Don - Celtic goddess; mother of Gwydion and Arianrhod; corresponds to Irish Danu
Cambria, Cymru, Wales - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; during Roman times the region was known as Cambria
5.Don - a European river in southwestern Russia; flows into the Sea of Azov
Russian Federation, Russia - a federation in northeastern Europe and northern Asia; formerly Soviet Russia; since 1991 an independent state
6.Don - a Spanish courtesy title or form of address for men that is prefixed to the forename; "Don Roberto"
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
Spanish - the Romance language spoken in most of Spain and the countries colonized by Spain
Verb1.don - put clothing on one's bodydon - put clothing on one's body; "What should I wear today?"; "He put on his best suit for the wedding"; "The princess donned a long blue dress"; "The queen assumed the stately robes"; "He got into his jeans"
dress, get dressed - put on clothes; "we had to dress quickly"; "dress the patient"; "Can the child dress by herself?"
hat - put on or wear a hat; "He was unsuitably hatted"
try on, try - put on a garment in order to see whether it fits and looks nice; "Try on this sweater to see how it looks"
scarf - wrap in or adorn with a scarf
slip on - put on with ease or speed; "slip into something more comfortable after work"; "slip on one's shoes"

don

1
verb put on, get into, dress in, pull on, change into, get dressed in, clothe yourself in, slip on or into The police donned riot gear.

don

2
noun lecturer, professor, fellow, academic, scholar The train was full of university dons.

don

verb
To put (an article of clothing) on one's person:
Translations
Donpukeutuasonnustautua

don

1 [dɒn] N
1. (Brit) (Univ) → catedrático/a m/f
2. (US) a Mafia donun capo de la Mafia

don

2 [dɒn] VT (liter) [+ garment] → ponerse, ataviarse con

don

[ˈdɒn]
n (British)professeur mf d'université(professeure f d'université)
vt (= put on) [+ hat, coat] → revêtir

don

2
vt garmentanziehen, anlegen (dated); hataufsetzen

don

1 [dɒn] n (Brit) (Univ) → docente m/f universitario/a

don

2 [dɒn] vt (old) (garment) → indossare
References in classic literature ?
Then things went smoothly, for Don Pedro defied the world in a speech of two pages without a single break.
Sometimes his crew would be heard dashing along past the farmhouses at midnight, with whoop and halloo, like a troop of Don Cossacks; and the old dames, startled out of their sleep, would listen for a moment till the hurry-scurry had clattered by, and then exclaim, "Ay, there goes Brom Bones and his gang
They don't know anything about the telegraph; they haven't had any experience yet, the line to Lon- don is so new.
He said if I warn't so ignorant, but had read a book called Don Quixote, I would know without asking.
From that blessed little room, Roderick Random, Peregrine Pickle, Humphrey Clinker, Tom Jones, the Vicar of Wakefield, Don Quixote, Gil Blas, and Robinson Crusoe, came out, a glorious host, to keep me company.
Why, to encounter such a whimsical fellow as myself in this unimaginative age was like meeting a fairy prince, or coming unexpectedly upon Don Quixote attacking the windmill.
In that pleasant district of merry England which is watered by the river Don, there extended in ancient times a large forest, covering the greater part of the beautiful hills and valleys which lie between Sheffield and the pleasant town of Doncaster.
After dinner, Don Pedro came to me, and desired to know my reason for so desperate an attempt; assured me, "he only meant to do me all the service he was able;" and spoke so very movingly, that at last I descended to treat him like an animal which had some little portion of reason.
The captain persuaded me to accept a suit of clothes newly made; but I would not suffer the tailor to take my measure; however, Don Pedro being almost of my size, they fitted me well enough.
Will you play me something out of your Don Juan Triumphant?
I will play you Mozart, if you like, which will only make you weep; but my Don Juan, Christine, burns; and yet he is not struck by fire from Heaven.
At this instant Don Quixote began shouting out, "Here, here, valiant knights