donnish

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don·nish

 (dŏn′ĭsh)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of a university don.
2. Bookish or pedantic.

donnish

(ˈdɒnɪʃ)
adj
(Education) of or resembling a university don
ˈdonnishly adv
ˈdonnishness n

don•nish

(ˈdɒn ɪʃ)

adj.
bookish; pedantic.
[1825–35]
don′nish•ly, adv.
don′nish•ness, n.

donnish

Characteristic of a university lecturer, especially in devotion to learning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.donnish - marked by a narrow focus on or display of learning especially its trivial aspectsdonnish - marked by a narrow focus on or display of learning especially its trivial aspects
scholarly - characteristic of scholars or scholarship; "scholarly pursuits"; "a scholarly treatise"; "a scholarly attitude"

donnish

adjective scholarly, erudite, scholastic, pedantic, bookish, pedagogic, precise, formalistic He is precise and mildly donnish in manner.

donnish

adjective
Characterized by a narrow concern for book learning and formal rules, without knowledge or experience of practical matters:
Translations

donnish

[ˈdɒnɪʃ] ADJ [life, discussion etc] → de erudito, de profesor; (in appearance) → de aspecto erudito (pej) → profesoril, pedantesco

donnish

(Brit: usu pej)
adjprofessoral; a donnish typeein typischer Gelehrter
References in periodicals archive ?
Anthony Kenny, who is better known as a philosopher and historian of ideas than as a literary critic, has reminded us of the importance and value of Clough, even though his book is donnishly dry, and its air, though bracing, often starved of oxygen.
Rather than the unappealing "spy novel," a more suitable description might be "the literature of clandestine political conflict" (but, as he observes donnishly, "you wouldn't want to pin that on a shelf in your bookstore").
In his tastes and his attitudes, his insistence that literature should emulate music, Pater came as close as the English could to the French Symbolist movement with something of the Symbolists' sacramentality, but in his case donnishly, even modestly, retiringly so.