doorplate


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

doorplate

(ˈdɔːˌpleɪt)
n
a name-plate on the door of a house or room
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.doorplate - a nameplate fastened to a door; indicates the person who works or lives there
nameplate - a plate bearing a name
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Chicksey and Stobbles, his former masters, had both become absorbed in Veneering, once their traveller or commission agent: who had signalized his accession to supreme power by bringing into the business a quantity of plate-glass window and French-polished mahogany partition, and a gleaming and enormous doorplate.
As if inspired by a klecksographic genealogy of haunted inkbottles and inkblots, Shem's authorial crimes take place within the inkbottle--the ultimate enclosure, as his inkbottle is plainly a space of privacy: "His penname SHUT sepiascraped on the doorplate and a blind of black sailcloth over its wan phwinshogue" (182.
A pad on the doorplate adds 3/8 inch to the length of the magazine (and overall pistol height) to ensure full seating on insertion and cushions the mag's rail when it hits the ground.
The rifle also has a hinged metal doorplate (complete with a bear's paw painted on it), and magazine capacity is four rounds.
His house-warming gift was a brass doorplate that said "Hunt-Neu.
Porthole doorplate Make sure everyone knows your bedroom is the captain's cabin with this porthole doorplate.
This mandrel was then placed between the 90 sides of the partially formed floorplate and the remainder was bent over the mandrel to duplicate the interlocking lip of an original doorplate.
I saw the doorplate saying Family Room and I went ballistic.
Writes McBurney, "there was no doorplate to identify the club's presence.
He gestures to a coffin doorplate with an inlaid photograph of a 17-year-old boy who was murdered in a housing project.
The last digit more or less swings in the breeze when the flat doorplate magazine is used, and there is less control or gripping surface when this magazine is employed.
These were compared with doorways in which the metal doorplate was sitting on wood; generally, approximately 4 cm of wood (a 2-inch strip) was visible beneath the metal plate, and in a few cases, the entire door plate was constructed of wood.