dopey


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dop·ey

also dop·y  (dō′pē)
adj. dop·i·er, dop·i·est Slang
1. Dazed or lethargic, as if drugged.
2. Stupid; doltish: a dopey kid.
3. Silly; foolish: a dopey answer.

dopey

(ˈdəʊpɪ) or

dopy

adj, dopier or dopiest
1. slang silly
2. informal half-asleep or in a state of semiconsciousness, as when under the influence of a drug
ˈdopily adv
ˈdopiness, ˈdopeyness n

dop•ey

or dop•y

(ˈdoʊ pi)

adj. dop•i•er, dop•i•est. Informal.
1. stupid; inane.
2. sluggish or befuddled, as from the use of narcotics or alcohol.
[1895–1900, Amer.]
dop′i•ness, dop′ey•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dopey - having or revealing stupiditydopey - having or revealing stupidity; "ridiculous anserine behavior"; "a dopey answer"; "a dopey kid"; "some fool idea about rewriting authors' books"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
stupid - lacking or marked by lack of intellectual acuity

dopey

dopy
adjective
1. drowsy, dazed, groggy (informal), drugged, muzzy, stupefied, half-asleep, woozy (informal) The medicine always made him feel dopey.
2. (Informal) stupid, simple, slow, thick, silly, foolish, dense, dumb (informal), senseless, goofy (informal), idiotic, dozy (Brit. informal), asinine, dumb-ass (slang) I was so dopey I believed him.

dopey

also dopy
adjective
1. Slang. Lacking mental and physical alertness and activity:
2. Slang. Lacking in intelligence:
Informal: thick.
Slang: dimwitted.
Translations
مُخَدَّر
otupělý
langsom i opfattelsensløv
uppdópaîur, í vímu
sersemlemiş

dopey

[ˈdəʊpɪ] ADJ (dopier (compar) (dopiest (superl))) (= drugged) → drogado, colocado; (= fuddled) → atontado; (= stupid) → corto

dopey

[ˈdəʊpi] adj
(because of drug, anaesthetic)comateux/euse
(= sleepy) [person] → à moitié endormi(e)
(= stupid) → abruti(e)

dopey

, dopy
adj (+er) (inf: = stupid) → bekloppt (inf), → blöd (inf); (= sleepy, half-drugged)benommen, benebelt (inf)

dopey

[ˈdəʊpɪ] (fam) adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (drugged) → inebetito/a; (stupid) → stupidotto/a; (sleepy) → addormentato/a

dope

(dəup) noun
any drug or drugs. He was accused of stealing dope from the chemist.
verb
to drug. They discovered that the racehorse had been doped.
ˈdopey adjective
made stupid (as if) by drugs. I was dopey from lack of sleep.

dopey, doped up

adj (fam) drogado
References in periodicals archive ?
DOPEY Don Stevie Craig last night said sorry for an act of stupidity which left Jimmy Calderwood's side sliding to a costly 1-0 defeat at Dundee.
Miro, Picasso, Dubuffet, and Archimboldo mix with Gertrude Stein and Marianne Moore; references to Hilton Kramer and Jacques Derrida share space with a recurring alter ego or signature--a cartoon bunny with a dopey phallic nose.
It's much more efficient - in Kuttner's dopey interpretation of the term - to make only four or five kinds of cereal.
DOPEY Wadim Golanev was left very small after laughing hysterically a 3ft 8ins prosecutor in court.
A DOPEY green-fingered thief led police straight to his door after leaving a trail of soil behind him.
DOPEY David Knight called the police when he couldn't get his moped to start - and was arrested for drink-driving.
The poll also found that while a third of people polled remember their drunken spending the next day, a dopey 14 per cent only realise the next time they check what is in their bank account.
dopey Ernie Luckman (Woody Harrelson; again, perfect) and the dealer his heart longs for, Donna Hawthorne (Winona Ryder; we shall not be the ones to judge).
It isn't just the beauty and the nostalgia that keep me coming back Despite the ominous drumbeat of change, Amsterdam remains one of the world's most genuinely liberal capitals--but not in a dopey, louche way.
Handler PC Tim Yeo, from South Wales Police's dog section, said: ``It sounds harsh but the Welsh dogs we are getting are just too dopey and nice.
A DOPEY guard dog has driven firefighters barking mad by setting himself on fire twice in one week.
MacKenzie, who relates in Hairball the joy he derives from giving art lectures to elementary school students in Kansas City, seems really to care about his readers, and this faintly dopey attitude is the main thing standing between his work and the tail-chasing ruminations of [sic].