dormouse


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Related to dormouse: Edible dormouse

dor·mouse

 (dôr′mous′)
n. pl. dor·mice (-mīs′)
Any of various small omnivorous rodents of the family Gliridae of Eurasia and Africa, having long furred tails and known for their long hibernation periods.

[Middle English, perhaps alteration (influenced by mous, mouse) of Anglo-Norman *dormeus, inclined to sleep, hibernating, from Old French dormir, to sleep; see dormant.]

dormouse

(ˈdɔːˌmaʊs)
n, pl -mice
(Animals) any small Old World rodent of the family Gliridae, esp the Eurasian Muscardinus avellanarius, resembling a mouse with a furry tail
[C15: dor-, perhaps from Old French dormir to sleep, from Latin dormīre + mouse]

dor•mouse

(ˈdɔrˌmaʊs)

n., pl. -mice (-ˌmaɪs)
any small usu. bushy-tailed Old World climbing rodent of the family Gliridae.
[1400–50; late Middle English dormowse, dormoise, perhaps Anglo-French derivative of Old French dormir to sleep (see dormant), with final syllable reanalyzed as mouse]

dormouse

- A rodent but not a mouse, it may be a corrupted form of French dormeus, "sleepy."
See also related terms for mice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weatherdormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weather
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
family Gliridae, Gliridae - dormice and other Old World forms
Glis glis, loir - large European dormouse
hazel mouse, Muscardinus avellanarius - a variety of dormouse
lerot - dormouse of southern Europe and northern Africa
Translations

dormouse

[ˈdɔːmaʊs] N (dormice (pl)) → lirón m

dormouse

[ˈdɔːrmaʊs] [dormice] [ˈdɔːrmaɪs] (pl) nloir m

dormouse

n pl <dormice> → Haselmaus f; edible or fat dormouseSiebenschläfer m; common dormouseGemeiner Siebenschläfer

dormouse

[ˈdɔːˌmaʊs] n (dormice (pl)) [ˈdɔːˌmaɪs]ghiro
References in classic literature ?
There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head.
They can't be nice, though they do say `as fat as a dormouse.
John Dormouse and his daughter began to sell peppermints and candles.
She was fond of all boy's plays, and greatly preferred cricket not merely to dolls, but to the more heroic enjoyments of infancy, nursing a dormouse, feeding a canary-bird, or watering a rose-bush.
A peach - a blushing, rich-flavored fruit, nestling in the trellis work on the garden- wall, hidden beneath its long, green leaves, - this little vegetable production, that a dormouse would nibble up without a thought, was sufficient to recall to the memory of this great monarch the mournful shade of the last surintendant of France.
The whole had a slovenly confined and sleepy look, like a cage for a human dormouse: while he, looming dark and heavy in the shadow of a corner by the window, looked like the human dormouse for whom it was fitted up - as indeed he was.
The first sorrow I can remember was for the death of a dormouse.
Soon after this, the discovery of Jamie curled up in the sofa corner, as sound asleep as a dormouse, suggested the propriety of going home, and a general move was made.
Gradgrind, if she said anything on the subject, she would come a little way out of her wrappers, like a feminine dormouse, and say:
Silent as a dormouse,'' said the Outlaw; ``and never trust me but I am grieved for thy daughter.
I can remedy that entirely," said he of the Grove, "and in this way: before we begin the battle, I will come up to your worship fair and softly, and give you three or four buffets, with which I shall stretch you at my feet and rouse your anger, though it were sleeping sounder than a dormouse.
With this address, which was delivered in her politest manner, Fanny left the room with an elegant and cheerful air--to tear up- stairs with a flushed face as soon as she was out of hearing, pounce in upon her sister, call her a little Dormouse, shake her for the better opening of her eyes, tell her what had passed below, and ask her what she thought of Pa now?