posterior

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Related to dorsalis: dorsalis pedis pulse, Dorsalis pedis

pos·te·ri·or

 (pŏ-stîr′ē-ər, pō-)
adj.
1. Located behind a part or toward the rear of a structure.
2. Relating to the caudal end of the body in quadrupeds or the back of the body in humans and other primates.
3. Botany Next to or facing the main stem or axis.
4. Coming after in order; following.
5. Following in time; subsequent.
n.
The buttocks.

[Latin, comparative of posterus, coming after, from post, afterward; see apo- in Indo-European roots.]

pos·te′ri·or·ly adv.

posterior

(pɒˈstɪərɪə)
adj
1. situated at the back of or behind something
2. coming after or following another in a series
3. coming after in time
4. (Zoology) zoology (of animals) of or near the hind end
5. (Botany) botany (of a flower) situated nearest to the main stem
6. (Anatomy) anatomy dorsal or towards the spine
n
7. (Anatomy) the buttocks; rump
8. (Statistics) statistics a posterior probability
[C16: from Latin: latter, from posterus coming next, from post after]
posˈteriorly adv

pos•te•ri•or

(pɒˈstɪər i ər, poʊ-)

adj.
1. situated behind or at the rear of; hinder (opposed to anterior).
2. coming after in order, as in a series.
3. coming after in time; later; subsequent (sometimes fol. by to).
4.
a. (in animals and embryos) pertaining to or toward the rear or caudal end of the body.
b. (in humans and other primates) pertaining to or toward the back plane of the body, equivalent to the dorsal surface of quadrupeds.
5. Bot. toward the back and near the main axis, as the upper lip of a flower.
n.
6. the hinder parts or rump of the body; buttocks.
[1525–35; < Latin, comp. of posterus coming after, derivative of post after]
pos•te′ri•or•ly, adv.
pos•te`ri•or′i•ty (-ˈɔr ɪ ti, -ˈɒr-) n.
syn: See back1.

posterior

1. Behind; to the rear.
2. Toward or at the back.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.posterior - the fleshy part of the human body that you sit onposterior - the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on; "he deserves a good kick in the butt"; "are you going to sit on your fanny and do nothing?"
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
torso, trunk, body - the body excluding the head and neck and limbs; "they moved their arms and legs and bodies"
2.posterior - a tooth situated at the back of the mouthposterior - a tooth situated at the back of the mouth
tooth - hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense
Adj.1.posterior - located at or near or behind a part or near the end of a structure
back - related to or located at the back; "the back yard"; "the back entrance"
anterior - of or near the head end or toward the front plane of a body
2.posterior - coming at a subsequent time or stage; "without ulterior argument"; "the mood posterior to"
subsequent - following in time or order; "subsequent developments"

posterior

noun
1. bottom, behind (informal), bum (Brit. slang), seat, rear, tail (informal), butt (U.S. & Canad. informal), ass (U.S. & Canad. taboo slang), buns (U.S. slang), arse (taboo slang), buttocks, backside, rump, rear end, derrière (euphemistic), tush (U.S. slang), fundament, jacksy (Brit. slang) her curvaceous posterior
adjective
1. rear, back, hinder, hind the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland

posterior

adjective
1. Located in the rear:
Nautical: after.
2. Following something else in time:
noun
The part of one's back on which one rests in sitting:
buttock (used in plural), derrière, rump, seat.
Informal: backside, behind, bottom, rear.
Slang: bun (used in plural), fanny, tush.
Chiefly British: bum.
Translations
تالٍ، لاحِق
pozdějšízadní
bag-bagerstbagtil
hát só
bak-, aftur-
vėlesnis
vēlākais
nasledujúci
arkasonraki

posterior

[pɒsˈtɪərɪəʳ]
A. ADJ (frm) → posterior
B. Ntrasero m

posterior

[pɒˈstɪəriər] npostérieur m, derrière m

posterior

adj (form)hintere(r, s); (in time) → spätere(r, s); to be posterior to somethinghinter etw (dat)liegen; (in time) → nach etw (dat)kommen, auf etw (acc)folgen
n (hum)Allerwerteste(r) m (hum)

posterior

[pɒsˈtɪərɪəʳ]
1. n (hum) → deretano, didietro
2. adj (Tech) → posteriore

posterior

(pəˈstiəriə) adjective
coming, or situated behind.

pos·ter·i·or

a. posterior.
rel. a la parte dorsal o trasera de una estructura;
que continúa; que sigue.

posterior

adj posterior
References in periodicals archive ?
dorsalis switched from a sugar-yeast hydrolysate diet to a sugar-only diet exhibited decreased mating success after 3 or 5 d of feeding on sugar exclusively.
A study on the biology and morphometric of different life stages of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendle) was carried out on three varieties of mango, namely Beganpali, Sindhri and Chunsa in laboratory under controlled conditions 26+-1Adegc and 65+-5%, at the department of Zoology University of Sindh Jamshoro, from June to August 2013.
Dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) (Latin: nervus dorsalis scapulae) neuropathy has been a rarely thought of differential diagnosis for mid scapular, upper to mid back pain.
In line with the previous investigation Dacus dorsalis appeared in the field in April and reached the maximum population in August (Gillani et al.
Most of the destructive species of fruit flies are Bactrocera dorsalis, Bactrocera zonata, Bactrocera cucurbitae and Dacus ciliates.
At least one more muscle innervated by different roots and peripheral nerves besides first interosseus dorsalis and tibialis anterior muscles was examined for both cervical and lumbosacral spinal cord regions, such as extensor digitorum communis, biceps brachii, or triangular muscles in upper limbs and gastrocnemius, quadriceps femoris, or biceps femoris muscles in lower limbs.
Notocyphus dorsalis arizonicus Townes (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae), a new host record of theraphosid spiders.
In Hawaii is often registered since it was introduced for the control of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).
He was advised arterial Doppler of both his lower limbs, as both his lower limb dorsalis pedis pulses were weak.
The dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial pulses of the left foot were palpable.