dot-commer

dot-com·mer

 (dŏt′kŏm′ər)
n.
One who works, especially in a professional or managerial capacity, for an internet business.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider our invention, in the past 50 years, of delectables on the order of couch potato, mouse potato (a couch potato attached to a computer), digerati, dot-commer, hottie, humongous, slam dunk, sleazebag, and soccer mom.
After Ellen and before The Ellen DeGeneres Show came this underrated sitcom about a lesbian dot-commer (played by guess who) moving back home.
The break room features classic dot-commer diversions such as foosball, air hockey and satellite television, and when employees return to their desks for work they have the chance to maintain a flexible schedule that allows them to attend to personal errands that would otherwise only occur during work hours.
Still, in some ways, however, a dot-commer is really no different than anyone else looking for a drastic change in their life.
Some young dot-commer may be having the time of her life, and will soon be lamenting the passing of her favorite hangout (perhaps a theme bar or sushi joint that folks like Keating advocate destroying) and the unique, irreplaceable crowd of bright young people gathered in that magic city of San Francisco.
21): Following a special September 17 preview, Ellen's eagerly awaited new sitcom--where she plays a burned-out dot-commer who returns to her hometown--will settle into its regular Friday timeslot [see p.
It was the most active market last quarter and my feeling is what's been driving Downtown is the dot-commer activity or telecommunications.
When the company opened in 2002, it catered mostly to well-heeled dot-commers willing to spend more to bring an artisan's touch to their kitchens.
The dot-commers are long forgotten, but that doesn't mean that the region's small and medium-sized companies evaporated with them.
After all, they know that dot-commers who got in and out early made the most money.
The fulfillment center must be prepared and equipped to follow through on what the Web site offers (a lesson that the early dot-commers could have benefited from).
In 2000, I witnessed a parade of punks in Road Warrior-esque vehicles chanting at dot-commers, "Go back to your cubicles