double exposure

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double exposure

n
1. (Photography) the act or process of recording two superimposed images on a photographic medium, usually done intentionally to produce a special effect
2. (Photography) the photograph resulting from such an act

dou′ble expo′sure


n.
1. the act of exposing the same photographic film, plate, etc., twice.
2. the picture resulting from this.
[1890–95]
Translations

double exposure

n (Phot) → sovrimpressione f
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References in periodicals archive ?
Both bedrooms have double exposures and the master bath, kitchen and dining area are windowed.
It was also the first camera to feature coupled film winding and shutter cocking, which helped prevent double exposures.
By Farah Abbas, untitled, digital double exposures.
Gaillard's complete ensemble, from his double mirrors and double exposures to doubled dubs and discs, constitutes a subtly formulated essay on the ever unfolding life of symbolic forms--one that reaches across geological time and encompasses flora and fauna, winners and losers alike.
He describes the camera's controls, menus, accessories, lenses, and system flash units; the hybrid viewfinder and monitor; exposure and metering; autofocus; ISO, detail, and image noise; extending the dynamic range; white balance and JPEG settings; continuous shooting, panoramas, movies, double exposures, and the self-timer; flash photography; and using third-party lenses.
AoChenAAEs pictures, with his use of double exposures, are very distinctive and recognizable,Ao said Tiffany Pinkstone, Hong Kong-based director of the Sovereign Art Foundation.
And although it's always mesmerizing to look at, cinematic flourishes involving double exposures, iris shots and varied film speeds distract from the lyrical realism Godard so carefully creates.
Events unfold with the logic of a fever-dream, fetishizing cultural artifacts and body parts interchangeably through close-ups, spotlights, irises-in, repetitions, double exposures and all manner of flickering low-tech special effects.
It's all double exposures, oblique angles, a sense of the world as a fleeting place that could, at any moment, become unhinged from reality.
I was surprised to find no mention of using double exposures as a creative aid for interesting astronomical scenes, such as the Moon over a city.