doublet


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Related to doublet: doublet antenna, doublet flow

dou·blet

 (dŭb′lĭt)
n.
1. A close-fitting jacket, with or without sleeves, worn by European men from the late 1300s to around 1650.
2.
a. A pair of similar or identical things.
b. A member of such a pair.
c. Physics A multiplet with two members.
3. Linguistics One of two words derived from the same historical source by different routes of transmission, such as skirt from Scandinavian and shirt from English.
4. An imitation gem composed of two parts, as of an inferior stone layered beneath a precious gem.
5. doublets Games A throw of two dice in which the same number of dots appears on the upper face of each.

[Middle English, from Old French, diminutive of double, double; see double.]

doublet

(ˈdʌblɪt)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) (formerly) a man's close-fitting jacket, with or without sleeves (esp in the phrase doublet and hose)
2.
a. a pair of similar things, esp two words deriving ultimately from the same source, for example reason and ratio or fragile and frail
b. one of such a pair
3. (Jewellery) jewellery a false gem made by welding a thin layer of a gemstone onto a coloured glass base or by fusing two small stones together to make a larger one
4. (General Physics) physics
a. a multiplet that has two members
b. a closely spaced pair of related spectral lines
5. (Games, other than specified) (plural) two dice each showing the same number of spots on one throw
6. (General Physics) physics two simple lenses designed to be used together, the optical distortion in one being balanced by that in the other
[C14: from Old French, from double]

dou•blet

(ˈdʌb lɪt)

n.
1. a close-fitting jacket, sleeved or sleeveless, sometimes with a short skirt, worn by men in the Renaissance.
2. a pair of like things; couple.
3. one of a pair of like things; duplicate.
4. a unit composed of two closely or identically matched pieces, as an artificial gem.
5. one of two or more words in a language that are derived from the same source, esp. through different routes, as coy and quiet, both taken from the same Latin word, quiet directly and coy by way of Old French.
6. doublets, a throw of a pair of dice in which the same number of spots turns up on each die.
7. a compound lens made of two thin lenses shaped so as to reduce chromatic and spherical aberrations.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French. See double, -et]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.doublet - a man's close-fitting jacketdoublet - a man's close-fitting jacket; worn during the Renaissance
jacket - a short coat

doublet

noun
Two items of the same kind together:
Translations
dubletvams

doublet

[ˈdʌblɪt] N
1. (archaic) (= garment) → jubón m
2. (Ling) → doblete m

doublet

n
Wams nt
(Ling) → Dublette f

doublet

[ˈdʌblɪt] n (History) (jacket) → farsetto
References in classic literature ?
Imagine to yourself a Don Quixote of eighteen; a Don Quixote without his corselet, without his coat of mail, without his cuisses; a Don Quixote clothed in a wooden doublet, the blue color of which had faded into a nameless shade between lees of wine and a heavenly azure; face long and brown; high cheek bones, a sign of sagacity; the maxillary muscles enormously developed, an infallible sign by which a Gascon may always be detected, even without his cap--and our young man wore a cap set off with a sort of feather; the eye open and intelligent; the nose hooked, but finely chiseled.
While he spoke thus, he stript off his gown, and appeared in a close black buckram doublet and drawers, over which he speedily did on a cassock of green, and hose of the same colour.
His felt doublet and leather jerkin made a spot on the velvet and silk which surrounded him.
Concino Concini, and his wife Galligai, who subsequently shone at the French court, sought to Italianize the fashion, and introduced some Florentine tailors; but Percerin, touched to the quick in his patriotism and his self-esteem, entirely defeated these foreigners, and that so well that Concino was the first to give up his compatriots, and held the French tailor in such esteem that he would never employ any other, and thus wore a doublet of his on the very day that Vitry blew out his brains with a pistol at the Pont du Louvre.
His doublet was of scarlet, while his long hose of white were crossgartered with scarlet from his tiny sandals to his knees.
sir, but my son is a fine man, with a kindly heart of his own, and it is as good as food to me to think that he should have a doublet of Lincoln green to his back and be the King's own paid man.
And saying these words, he girded on a short sword, placed a pistol in his belt, disclosing in this movement, which opened his doublet a little, the fine rings of a coat of mail, destined to protect him from the first dagger-thrust of an assassin.
The little tailor, who was only pretending to be asleep, began to cry out in a clear voice: 'Boy, make me the doublet and patch me the pantaloons, or I will rap the yard-measure over your ears.
I want to put on lavender-colored tights, with red velvet breeches and a green doublet slashed with yellow; to have a light-blue silk cloak on my shoulder, and a black eagle's plume waving from my hat, and a big sword, and a falcon, and a lance, and a prancing horse, so that I might go about and gladden the eyes of the people.
And at the zenith of his fame, how he would suddenly appear at the old village and stalk into church, brown and weather-beaten, in his black velvet doublet and trunks, his great jack-boots, his crimson sash, his belt bristling with horse-pistols, his crime-rusted cut- lass at his side, his slouch hat with waving plumes, his black flag unfurled, with the skull and crossbones on it, and hear with swelling ecstasy the whisperings, "It's Tom Sawyer the Pirate
The rest of it went in a doublet of fine cloth and velvet breeches and shoes to match for holidays, while on week-days he made a brave figure in his best homespun.
Presently there was a distant blare of military music; it came nearer, still nearer, and soon a noble cavalcade wound into view, glorious with plumed helmets and flashing mail and flaunting banners and rich doublets and horse-cloths and gilded spear- heads; and through the muck and swine, and naked brats, and joyous dogs, and shabby huts, it took its gallant way, and in its wake we followed.