doubter


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Related to doubter: doubtfully, Doubtable

doubt

 (dout)
v. doubt·ed, doubt·ing, doubts
v.tr.
1. To be undecided or skeptical about: began to doubt some accepted doctrines.
2. To tend to disbelieve; distrust: doubts politicians when they make sweeping statements.
3. To regard as unlikely: I doubt that we'll arrive on time.
4. Archaic To suspect; fear.
v.intr.
To be undecided or skeptical.
n.
1.
a. The state of being uncertain about the truth or reliability of something. See Synonyms at uncertainty.
b. often doubts A feeling of uncertainty or distrust: had doubts about his ability.
2. A point about which one is uncertain or skeptical: reassured me by answering my doubts.
3. The condition of being unsettled or unresolved: an outcome still in doubt.
Idioms:
beyond/without doubt
Without question; certainly; definitely.
no doubt
1. Certainly.
2. Probably.

[Middle English douten, from Old French douter, from Latin dubitāre, to waver; see dwo- in Indo-European roots.]

doubt′er n.
Usage Note: The choice of what conjunction to use following doubt and doubtful is a perennial usage problem. When doubt and doubtful indicate strong uncertainty, the Usage Panel prefers whether and that over if. In our 2008 survey, 51 percent indicated that they would use that, while 43 percent preferred whether in the following sentence: At one time it was doubtful [that/whether/if] the company could recover from its financial difficulties, but the government loan seems to have helped. Only 6 percent said they would favor if in this sentence, probably because if has a more informal tone. When the expectation for the outcome is negative, that tends to be used. Some 86 percent of the Panel prefer that in the sentence I doubt [that/whether/if] it will rain tomorrow (where the expectation is that it probably won't rain), with whether getting the preference of only 6 percent and if getting 7 percent. Note that, in certain kinds of sentences, the choice of conjunction can carry subtle differences in implication. That is the best choice when the truth of the clause following doubt is assumed, as in negative sentences and questions. Thus I never doubted for a minute that I would be rescued implies "I was certain that I would be rescued." By the same token, Do you doubt that you will be paid? may be understood as a rhetorical question meaning "Surely you believe that you will be paid," whereas Do you doubt whether you will be paid? expresses a genuine request for information (and might be followed by Because if you do, you should make the client post a bond). Note that it is also acceptable to omit that in these sentences: I doubt she will accept the nomination. In other cases, however, this distinction between whether and that is not always observed. · When doubt is negated to indicate belief or certainty, the clause following doubt is sometimes introduced with but that or simply but, as in I do not doubt but that they will come. This construction has been used by many fine writers, but some critics object to its use in formal writing. Dropping the but easily solves this problem. See Usage Notes at but, if.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.doubter - someone who habitually doubts accepted beliefsdoubter - someone who habitually doubts accepted beliefs
intellectual, intellect - a person who uses the mind creatively
doubting Thomas - someone who demands physical evidence in order to be convinced (especially when this demand is out of place)
pessimist - a person who expects the worst
2.doubter - someone who is doubtful or noncommittal about something
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"

doubter

noun sceptic, questioner, disbeliever, agnostic, unbeliever, doubting Thomas Doubters fear this may not be good news.

doubter

noun
One who habitually or instinctively doubts or questions:
Translations

doubter

[ˈdaʊtəʳ] Nescéptico/a m/f

doubter

[ˈdaʊtər] n (= sceptic) → sceptique mf

doubter

nSkeptiker(in) m(f), → Zweifler(in) m(f)

doubter

[ˈdaʊtəʳ] nscettico/a
References in classic literature ?
Yet they thought confidently that this was a secure and permanent progressive system, and on the strength of some three hundred years of change and irregular improvement answered the doubter with, "Things always have gone well.
The English offices must have been founded by that celebrated saint and doubter, mentioned in the New Testament, whose name was Thomas
A heretic wilt thou be to thyself, and a wizard and a sooth-sayer, and a fool, and a doubter, and a reprobate, and a villain.
So, to silence these doubters, Bell and Watson planned a most severe test of the telephone.
Why, I'll make the doubters swallow the pieces of the balloon, without either salt or pepper
For the rest she was brown-eyed, a little clumsy in movement, and suggested country birth and a descent from respectable hard-working ancestors, who had been men of faith and integrity rather than doubters or fanatics.
The observation every day at noon, and the subsequent working of the vessel's course, was, as may be supposed, a feature in our lives of paramount importance; nor were there wanting (as there never are) sagacious doubters of the captain's calculations, who, so soon as his back was turned, would, in the absence of compasses, measure the chart with bits of string, and ends of pocket- handkerchiefs, and points of snuffers, and clearly prove him to be wrong by an odd thousand miles or so.
The matter-of-fact and doubtful folks, of whom there were a few among the Maypole customers, as unluckily there always are in every little community, were inclined to look upon this tradition as rather apocryphal; but, whenever the landlord of that ancient hostelry appealed to the mounting block itself as evidence, and triumphantly pointed out that there it stood in the same place to that very day, the doubters never failed to be put down by a large majority, and all true believers exulted as in a victory.
The doubter can also be a bad role model for his or her juniors, radiating scepticism throughout the company.
With the right kind of evidence, the doubter can become a believer.
The result, while not final and authoritative, is an impressive work that belongs on the shelf of any studious freethinker or, as Hecht would prefer, doubter.
For kindred spirits, Hecht has made clear that "to be a doubter is a great old allegiance, deserving quiet respect and open pride.