down-in-the-mouth


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Related to down-in-the-mouth: Down in the Dumps

down-in-the-mouth

adj
glum
Translations

down-in-the-mouth

[ˈdaʊnɪnðəˈmaʊθ] ADJdecaído, deprimido

down-in-the-mouth

[ˈdaʊnɪnðəˈmaʊθ] adj to look down-in-the-mouthavere un'aria abbattuta

down1

(daun) adverb
1. towards or in a low or lower position, level or state. He climbed down to the bottom of the ladder.
2. on or to the ground. The little boy fell down and cut his knee.
3. from earlier to later times. The recipe has been handed down in our family for years.
4. from a greater to a smaller size, amount etc. Prices have been going down steadily.
5. towards or in a place thought of as being lower, especially southward or away from a centre. We went down from Glasgow to Bristol.
preposition
1. in a lower position on. Their house is halfway down the hill.
2. to a lower position on, by, through or along. Water poured down the drain.
3. along. The teacher's gaze travelled slowly down the line of children.
verb
to finish (a drink) very quickly, especially in one gulp. He downed a pint of beer.
ˈdownward adjective
leading, moving etc down. a downward curve.
ˈdownward(s) adverb
towards a lower position or state. The path led downward (s) towards the sea.
down-and-ˈout noun, adjective
(a person) having no money and no means of earning a living. a hostel for down-and-outs.
ˌdown-at-ˈheel adjective
shabby, untidy and not well looked after or well-dressed.
ˈdowncast adjective
(of a person) depressed; in low spirits. a downcast expression.
ˈdownfall noun
a disastrous fall, especially a final failure or ruin. the downfall of our hopes.
ˌdownˈgrade verb
to reduce to a lower level, especially of importance. His job was downgraded.
ˌdownˈhearted adjective
depressed and in low spirits, especially lacking the inclination to carry on with something. Don't be downhearted! – we may yet win.
ˌdownˈhill adverb
1. down a slope. The road goes downhill all the way from our house to yours.
2. towards a worse and worse state. We expected him to die, I suppose, because he's been going steadily downhill for months.
downˈhill racing noun
racing downhill on skis.
downˈhill skiing noun
ˌdown-in-the-ˈmouth adjective
miserable; in low spirits.
down payment
a payment in cash, especially to begin the purchase of something for which further payments will be made over a period of time.
ˈdownpour noun
a very heavy fall of rain.
ˈdownright adverb
plainly; there's no other word for it. I think he was downright rude!
adjective
He is a downright nuisance!
ˈdownstairs adjective
, ˌdownˈstairsadverb on or towards a lower floor. He walked downstairs; I left my book downstairs; a downstairs flat.
ˌdownˈstream adverb
further along a river towards the sea. We found/rowed the boat downstream.
ˌdown-to-ˈearth adjective
practical and not concerned with theories, ideals etc. She is a sensible, down-to-earth person.
ˈdowntown adjective
(American) the part (of a city) containing the main centres for business and shopping. downtown Manhattan.
ˌdownˈtown adverb
(also down town) in or towards this area. to go downtown; I was down town yesterday.
ˈdown-trodden adjective
badly treated; treated without respect. a down-trodden wife.
be/go down with
to be or become ill with. The children all went down with measles.
down on one's luck
having bad luck.
down tools
to stop working. When the man was sacked his fellow workers downed tools and walked out.
down with
get rid of. Down with the dictator!
get down to
to begin working seriously at or on. I must get down to some letters!
suit (someone) down to the ground
to suit perfectly. That arrangement will suit me down to the ground.