downrange


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down·range

 (doun′rānj′)
adv. & adj.
In a direction away from the launch site and along the flight line of a missile test range: landed a thousand miles downrange; the downrange target area.

downrange

(ˈdaʊnˈreɪndʒ)
adj, adv
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) in the direction of the intended flight path of a rocket or missile

down•range

(adj. ˈdaʊnˌreɪndʒ; adv. -ˈreɪndʒ)

adj., adv.
being in the designated path between a rocket launch pad and the point on a course generally taken as the target.
[1950–55]
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultimately, there will always be a tradeoff between launch speed and downrange penetration.
The secondary trailing bullet, a wadcutter/full-diameter/ open-tip projectile was also predictable downrange.
44 Magnum in downrange trajectory and, in equivalent barrel lengths, is not far off its big brother in power.
You charge them up with a quantity of energy and they expend that energy on targets downrange.
I'm fond of reduced-recoil loads for many reasons, but they do sacrifice a bit of trajectory and downrange energy in exchange for being softer on the shoulder.
But the message goes beyond using the Downrange Tomahawk as a breeching tool.
Besides, it didn't take more than those velocities pushing a 39 or 40 ounce pill downrange to knock over a slow moving tin duck, ring a bell hiding behind a bullseye or convince a papier-mache clown's grinning open mouth to partially inflate a balloon.
Set the safety to S, keep the weapon pointed downrange, and stay away from it for 15 minutes.
Weapons remained in theatre even after the end of the assessment phase, and might have returned to the US for wear and tear evaluation, however some of the five original weapons should be again downrange.
The trajectory of the missile, which has an operational strike range of 700 km, was tracked by sophisticated radars and electro-optic telemetry stations located along the sea coast and ships positioned near the impact point in the downrange area.
It continues long after a system or service is produced--in the hands and mind of the warfighter downrange.
Because of the projectile's momentum, rays formed in the downrange direction are longer than in the uprange direction.