downright


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down·right

 (doun′rīt′)
adj.
1. Thoroughgoing; unequivocal: a downright lie.
2. Forthright; candid.
adv.
Thoroughly; absolutely.

downright

(ˈdaʊnˌraɪt)
adj
1. frank or straightforward; blunt: downright speech.
2. archaic directed or pointing straight down
adv, adj (prenominal)
(intensifier): a downright certainty; downright rude.
ˈdownˌrightly adv
ˈdownˌrightness n

down•right

(ˈdaʊnˌraɪt)

adv.
1. completely; thoroughly: downright angry.
adj.
2. thorough; absolute.
3. frank; straightforward.
4. Archaic. directed straight down.
[1175–1225]
down′right`ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.downright - characterized by plain blunt honesty; "a downright answer"; "a downright kind of person"
honest, honorable - not disposed to cheat or defraud; not deceptive or fraudulent; "honest lawyers"; "honest reporting"
2.downright - complete and without restriction or qualificationdownright - complete and without restriction or qualification; sometimes used informally as intensifiers; "absolute freedom"; "an absolute dimwit"; "a downright lie"; "out-and-out mayhem"; "an out-and-out lie"; "a rank outsider"; "many right-down vices"; "got the job through sheer persistence"; "sheer stupidity"
complete - having every necessary or normal part or component or step; "a complete meal"; "a complete wardrobe"; "a complete set of the Britannica"; "a complete set of china"; "a complete defeat"; "a complete accounting"
Adv.1.downright - thoroughgoing; "he is outright dishonest"
intensifier, intensive - a modifier that has little meaning except to intensify the meaning it modifies; "`up' in `finished up' is an intensifier"; "`honestly' in `I honestly don't know' is an intensifier"

downright

adjective
2. blunt, open, frank, plain, straightforward, sincere, outspoken, honest, candid, forthright, upfront (informal), straight-from-the-shoulder a simple, downright chap with no rhetorical airs about him

downright

adjective
Translations
بِصَراحَه، بِكُلِّ مَعْنى الكَلِمَهصَريح، واضِح، بِصَراحَه
naprostývyloženěvyloženývýslovně
fuldkommen
algerhreinn og beinn, alger
vyložene
bütünüyletam anlamıylatam anlamıyla tamamen

downright

[ˈdaʊnraɪt]
A. ADJ [nonsense, lie] → patente, manifiesto; [refusal] → categórico
B. ADV [rude, angry] → realmente

downright

[ˈdaʊnraɪt]
adj (= out-and-out) [rudeness, hostility] → franc(franche); [lie] → pur(e) et simple
adv (= positively) → carrément, purement et simplementdown-river downriver [ˌdaʊnˈrɪvər]
adven aval
to be down-river from [+ place] → être en aval de
to move down-river → descendre le courant
adj (= downstream) [city, building] → en aval

downright

[ˈdaʊnˌraɪt]
1. adj (person, manner) → franco/a; (lie, liar) → bell'e buono/a; (refusal) → categorico/a, assoluto/a
2. adv (rude, disgusting) → davvero

down1

(daun) adverb
1. towards or in a low or lower position, level or state. He climbed down to the bottom of the ladder.
2. on or to the ground. The little boy fell down and cut his knee.
3. from earlier to later times. The recipe has been handed down in our family for years.
4. from a greater to a smaller size, amount etc. Prices have been going down steadily.
5. towards or in a place thought of as being lower, especially southward or away from a centre. We went down from Glasgow to Bristol.
preposition
1. in a lower position on. Their house is halfway down the hill.
2. to a lower position on, by, through or along. Water poured down the drain.
3. along. The teacher's gaze travelled slowly down the line of children.
verb
to finish (a drink) very quickly, especially in one gulp. He downed a pint of beer.
ˈdownward adjective
leading, moving etc down. a downward curve.
ˈdownward(s) adverb
towards a lower position or state. The path led downward (s) towards the sea.
down-and-ˈout noun, adjective
(a person) having no money and no means of earning a living. a hostel for down-and-outs.
ˌdown-at-ˈheel adjective
shabby, untidy and not well looked after or well-dressed.
ˈdowncast adjective
(of a person) depressed; in low spirits. a downcast expression.
ˈdownfall noun
a disastrous fall, especially a final failure or ruin. the downfall of our hopes.
ˌdownˈgrade verb
to reduce to a lower level, especially of importance. His job was downgraded.
ˌdownˈhearted adjective
depressed and in low spirits, especially lacking the inclination to carry on with something. Don't be downhearted! – we may yet win.
ˌdownˈhill adverb
1. down a slope. The road goes downhill all the way from our house to yours.
2. towards a worse and worse state. We expected him to die, I suppose, because he's been going steadily downhill for months.
downˈhill racing noun
racing downhill on skis.
downˈhill skiing noun
ˌdown-in-the-ˈmouth adjective
miserable; in low spirits.
down payment
a payment in cash, especially to begin the purchase of something for which further payments will be made over a period of time.
ˈdownpour noun
a very heavy fall of rain.
ˈdownright adverb
plainly; there's no other word for it. I think he was downright rude!
adjective
He is a downright nuisance!
ˈdownstairs adjective
, ˌdownˈstairsadverb on or towards a lower floor. He walked downstairs; I left my book downstairs; a downstairs flat.
ˌdownˈstream adverb
further along a river towards the sea. We found/rowed the boat downstream.
ˌdown-to-ˈearth adjective
practical and not concerned with theories, ideals etc. She is a sensible, down-to-earth person.
ˈdowntown adjective
(American) the part (of a city) containing the main centres for business and shopping. downtown Manhattan.
ˌdownˈtown adverb
(also down town) in or towards this area. to go downtown; I was down town yesterday.
ˈdown-trodden adjective
badly treated; treated without respect. a down-trodden wife.
be/go down with
to be or become ill with. The children all went down with measles.
down on one's luck
having bad luck.
down tools
to stop working. When the man was sacked his fellow workers downed tools and walked out.
down with
get rid of. Down with the dictator!
get down to
to begin working seriously at or on. I must get down to some letters!
suit (someone) down to the ground
to suit perfectly. That arrangement will suit me down to the ground.
References in classic literature ?
Twas downright madness to show six feet of flesh and blood, on a naked rock, to the raging savages.
At last, after creeping, as it were, for such a length of time along the utmost verge of the opaque puddle of obscurity, they had taken that downright plunge which, sooner or later, is the destiny of all families, whether princely or plebeian.
No town-bred dandy will compare with a country-bred one -- I mean a downright bumpkin dandy --a fellow that, in the dog-days, will mow his two acres in buckskin gloves for fear of tanning his hands.
And I can tell ye it is a downright pleasure to handle an animal like this, well-bred, well-mannered, well-cared-for; bless ye
I wouldn't give a fip for all your politics, generally, but I think this is something downright cruel and unchristian.
Knightley's downright, decided, commanding sort of manner, though it suits him very well; his figure, and look, and situation in life seem to allow it; but if any young man were to set about copying him, he would not be sufferable.
Don't long for poison--don't turn out a downright Eve on my hands
He neither spoke nor loosed his hold for some five minutes, during which period he bestowed more kisses than ever he gave in his life before, I daresay: but then my mistress had kissed him first, and I plainly saw that he could hardly bear, for downright agony, to look into her face
Once they made him wear a brace but he fretted so he was downright ill.
Her father turned on her with a sudden severity, so entirely unparalleled in her experience of him that she started back in downright terror.
I use the word natural, in the sense of its being unaffected; there was something comic in his distraught way, as though it would have been downright ludicrous but for his own perception that it was very near being so.
The lass hasn't said downright she won't have you, has she?