downsizing

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down·size

 (doun′sīz′)
v. down·sized, down·siz·ing, down·siz·es
v.tr.
1. To reduce in number or size: a corporation that downsized its personnel in response to a poor economy.
2. To dismiss or lay off from work: workers who were downsized during the recession.
3. To make in a smaller size: cars that were downsized during an era of high gasoline prices.
4. To simplify (one's life, for instance), as by reducing the number of one's possessions.
v.intr.
1. To become smaller in size by reductions in personnel or assets: Corporations continued to downsize after the economy recovered.
2. To live in a simpler way, especially by moving into a smaller residence.

downsizing

(ˈdaʊnˌsaɪzɪŋ)
n
1. (Commerce) a reduction of the number of people that a company employs
2. (Commerce) a reduction in size
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.downsizing - the reduction of expenditures in order to become financially stable
saving, economy - an act of economizing; reduction in cost; "it was a small economy to walk to work every day"; "there was a saving of 50 cents"
Translations

downsizing

[ˈdaʊnsaɪzɪŋ] n [company, industry] → dégraissage mDown's syndrome Down's [ˈdaʊnz]
n (= condition) → trisomie f
modif [baby, child] → trisomique; [foetus] → trisomique
References in periodicals archive ?
Time lapse between consecutive downsizings (TIMELAPSE).
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL cites several studies that suggest that "corporate downsizings have failed to produce what was expected.
I have another favorite question that remains unanswered: Why are widespread downsizings still legal?
In the case of these downsizings, the surviving employees were successfully shown that they should not feel victimized by the downsizing process, but instead should see this process as an opportunity for personal growth.
The largest organizations anticipate more downsizings in the next three years (2001-2003):
We've been talking about the impact of downsizings on the 'survivors' for a decade now, but there are still some companies who haven't made the connection yet.
Despite several significant downsizings earlier in the year, leasing activity rebounded strongly in the second half, leaving the city with a positive absorption of 244,901 square feet.
The only decline in this was during the late 1980s when downsizings, mergers and reorganizations were rampant.
I have been through several downsizings on the mill side and one mill closure.
Thirty-one downsizing survivors from both the private and public sector were interviewed to determine incidents that either helped or hindered their transition through 1 or more organizational downsizings.
Most downsizings are done surreptitiously, in the hopes that consumers won't notice.
Recently, however, casual observers are reporting that many companies which announced downsizings have not reached anticipated goals, and in fact, may be worse off than before the action as expected benefits do not come to fruition (Fefer, 1994; Lesley & Light, 1992; Margulis, 1994).