downtime


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down·time

 (doun′tīm′)
n.
1. The period of time when something, such as a factory or a piece of machinery, is not in operation, especially as the result of a malfunction.
2. A period of time when one is not working or engaged in a planned activity: "Railroaders' sleep habits are constantly disrupted, and their downtime is rarely long enough to ensure a good night's rest" (Jeff Goodell).

downtime

(ˈdaʊnˌtaɪm)
n
1. (Commerce) commerce time during which a machine or plant is not working because it is incapable of production, as when under repair: the term is sometimes used to include all nonproductive time. Compare idle time
2. informal time spent not working; spare time

down•time

(ˈdaʊnˌtaɪm)

n.
a time during a workshift when an employee is not working or a machine is not in operation.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.downtime - a period of time when something (as a machine or factory) is not operating (especially as a result of malfunctions)
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
uptime - a period of time when something (as a machine or factory) is functioning and available for use
Translations

downtime

[ˈdaʊnˌtaɪm] Ntiempo m de inactividad, tiempo m muerto

downtime

[ˈdaʊntaɪm] n
[machine] → durée m d'inactivité; [computer] → temps m d'arrêt
[person] → temps m d'arrêtdown-to-earth [ˌdaʊntəˈɜːrθ] adj [common sense] → réaliste
to be down-to-earth [person] → avoir les pieds sur terre

downtime

[ˈdaʊnˈtaɪm] n (Comm) → tempi mpl morti
References in periodicals archive ?
Neverfail's mission of eliminating application downtime for the end user delivers the assurance of business continuity, removes the commercial and IT management costs associated with system downtime and enables the more productive use of IT resources.
Downtime costs can run into the hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars per hour.
While business reliance on the availability and performance of enterprise applications is at an all-time high, the tolerance for downtime is next to nil," said Marshall Senk, vice president of marketing for Quest Software.
The end result of installing the filters was said to be less frequent repairing of pumps, which meant an overall cost savings in labor and downtime.
If your foundry is just establishing its PM program, the first step is to assemble all available data on downtime for existing equipment.
The Costs of Enterprise Downtime, North America 2004 is based on surveys of 80 large organizations, taking an in-depth look at the many types of downtime costs, from the easy-to-quantify lost sales on disrupted e-commerce sites to the more difficult-to-quantify lost employee productivity due to clogged WAN connections or misconfigured firewalls.
At one point, we started to slip with keeping scheduled downtime available for maintenance.
ProHelp process quality control and real-time production monitoring system includes functions for bar coding and parts traceability, SPC/SQC programs, production reports, scrap and downtime reports, and machine-efficiency reports.
Recruiting in the healthcare industry is an around-the-clock job and downtime can not be tolerated," said Ted Elliott, CEO of Jobscience Inc.
Planned downtime is unpleasant but often occurs as a business choice.
Most IT managers suspect that downtime costs a ton of money-they have a sinking feeling that money is draining from the company coffers every time a server crashes, an Ethernet switch flashes yellow and then goes dark, or a service provider sends a courteous e-mail a week after a T1 went down," said Jeff Wilson, executive director of Infonetics Research.
Trend and X-Bar and R displays are also available, as well as capability for entering scrap codes, downtime codes, operator and job codes, and automatic entries of SQC data.