downturn

(redirected from downturns)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to downturns: Market Downturns

down·turn

 (doun′tûrn′)
n.
A tendency downward, especially in business or economic activity.

downturn

(ˈdaʊnˌtɜːn)
n
(Economics) a drop or reduction in the success of a business or economy

down•turn

(ˈdaʊnˌtɜrn)

n.
1. an act or instance of turning down, or the state of being turned down: the downturn of a lower lip.
2. a downward trend; decline.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.downturn - a worsening of business or economic activity; "the market took a downturn"
worsening - changing something with the result that it becomes worse
downspin - a swift and dangerous downturn

downturn

noun
A usually swift downward trend, as in prices:
Translations
heikkeneminenlaskulaskusuhdannetaantuma

downturn

[ˈdaʊntɜːn] N (in economy) → deterioro m; (in sales, production) → disminución f

downturn

[ˈdaʊntɜːrn] n (= slump) → récession f
a downturn in → une récession dansdown under adv
(= in Australia) → en Australie
(= in New Zealand) → en Nouvelle-Zélande
References in periodicals archive ?
They generally become conservative in downturns, cutting costs, headcount and other so-called "quick-fixes.
The economic recession gripping the UK is likely to be as long and deep as the previous three major post-war downturns in the mid-70s, early 80s and early 90s, Bank of England (BoE) policymaker Andrew Sentance predicted yesterday.
While no economist is forecasting such a tremendous amount of job less, Torto did say that a 10% unemployment rate is possible this time around--and that would hit Americans much harder than recent downturns.
To compare housing downturns across time in a meaningful way, it helps to look at various indicators of the market as indexes as opposed to raw numbers.
As a result, companies need to pay special attention in order to manage risks that arise from the uncertainty during downturns in the credit cycle.
The study showed that during the twin downturns of the mid-1970s, 49 percent of job losses were cyclical, temporary job losses that would bounce back when the business cycle turned upwards, while 51 percent of the job losses were structural, permanent job losses, jobs that either no longer exist or won't exist in this country.
The concerns motivating the chapter relate to the fact that discretionary fiscal interventions may be pro-cyclical, as in the case of fiscal tightening during downturns especially.
As Crone examines the cyclical component of economic activity, it also appears that Pennsylvania's cyclical downturns have been more severe than those of the Nation as a whole.
It exacts a heavy toll in terms of tax administration and is pro-cyclical, constituting an unnecessary drag on capital investment during economic downturns.
He noted that during other sharp, but smaller, downturns since 1990, investors seemed to see an opportunity to buy rather than an incentive to sell, a fact that had helped the market recover.
As a result, while politically difficult, capital program spending can be adjusted to ease the pressure of reduced sales tax collections and operating expense growth during economic downturns.