dowry

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dow·ry

 (dou′rē)
n. pl. dow·ries
1. Money or property brought by a bride to her husband at marriage.
2. A sum of money required of a postulant at a convent.
3. A natural endowment or gift; a talent.
4. Archaic See dower.

[Middle English douerie, from Anglo-Norman douarie, from Medieval Latin dōtārium, dōārium, dōāria, dower; see dower.]

dowry

(ˈdaʊərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Sociology) the money or property brought by a woman to her husband at marriage
2. (Sociology) (esp formerly) a gift made by a man to his bride or her parents
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a sum of money required on entering certain orders of nuns
4. a natural talent or gift
5. (Sociology) obsolete a widow's dower
[C14: from Anglo-French douarie, from Medieval Latin dōtārium; see dower]

dow•ry

(ˈdaʊ ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. Also, dower. the money, goods, etc., that a wife brings to her husband at marriage.
2. a natural gift; talent.
3. Archaic. a widow's dower.
[1250–1300; Middle English dowerie < Anglo-French douarie < Medieval Latin dōtārium. See dot2, -ary]

Dowry

 a portion given with a bride; a gift of nature or fortune; a lot, a great deal—Slang Dictionary, 1874.
Example: dowry of parny [rain or water], 1874.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dowry - money or property brought by a woman to her husband at marriagedowry - money or property brought by a woman to her husband at marriage
gift - something acquired without compensation

dowry

noun portion, marriage settlement, dot (archaic), lobola (S. African) The money from her dowry was invested.
Translations
مَهْر، بائِنَه
věno
medgift
myötäjäiset
mirazprćija
hozomány
heimanmundur
dos
kraitis
pūrs
veno

dowry

[ˈdaʊrɪ] Ndote f

dowry

[ˈdaʊəri] ndot f

dowry

nMitgift f

dowry

[ˈdaʊrɪ] ndote f

dowry

(ˈdauəri) plural ˈdowries noun
money and property brought by a woman to her husband when they marry.
References in classic literature ?
Surely, at this day, with us of Europe, the vantage of strength at sea (which is one of the principal dowries of this kingdom of Great Britain) is great; both because most of the kingdoms of Europe, are not merely inland, but girt with the sea most part of their compass; and because the wealth of both Indies seems in great part, but an accessory to the command of the seas.
The argument that no one would keep his cattle in such exposed and inaccessible spots has no weight at all, if you reflect that in those days a man's cattle were his capital, his stock-in-trade, his daughter's dowries.
Rahman (2001) claims that 25,000 brides are brutally killed each year because of disputes over dowries.
These included family structures that already had two or three daughters, and the determination that the cost of providing dowries for additional daughters was too high.
Because men have to pay large dowries for girls, many must work for years to generate enough income.
Metcalf reached this conclusion after studying the number of slaves owned by a family, how these were distributed in dowries and inheritance received and then in several succeeding censuses.
In Sikh and Hindu culture as well efforts are made to have dowries returned on marriage breakdown.
The evidence suggests that at all levels of society more Latin men married Greek women (who brought dowries into Latin hands) than Greek men married Latin women (who would have passed their dowries into Greek hands), in a pattern tolerated by the colonial government, which on the whole disapproved of and at times prohibited intermarriage between Greeks and Latins.
Another judge, this time a man, Steven Kavuma, expressed concern about the commercialisation of dowries, yet found no "convincing reason for the Court to impose a ban on such a constitutionally guaranteed custom" which is evidently enjoyed and practiced by a large majority of Ugandans.
Summary: Housing issues, dowries, and unemployment lead some couples to marrying en masse.
Dowry inflation, invoked by contemporaries and modern scholars to account for patricians' consigning a growing proportion of their daughters to convents with "deposits" much less costly than marital dowries, thereby eliminating further claims on the family patrimony, does not in Sperling's view constitute a sufficient explanation.