doxy

(redirected from doxies)
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dox·y

 (dŏk′sē)
n. pl. dox·ies Archaic
1. A female lover; a mistress.
2.
a. A woman prostitute.
b. A woman who is regarded as sexually promiscuous.

[Perhaps from obsolete Dutch docke, doll.]

doxy

(ˈdɒksɪ) or

doxie

n, pl doxies
(Theology) opinion or doctrine, esp concerning religious matters
[C18: independent use of -doxy as in orthodoxy, heterodoxy]

doxy

(ˈdɒksɪ)
n, pl doxies
archaic slang a prostitute or mistress
[C16: probably from Middle Flemish docke doll; compare Middle Dutch docke doll]

dox•y

(ˈdɒk si)

n., pl. dox•ies.
1. a mistress.
2. a prostitute.
[1520–30; of obscure orig.]

doxy

- Can mean "mistress, sweetheart."
See also related terms for mistress.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.doxy - a woman who cohabits with an important mandoxy - a woman who cohabits with an important man
kept woman, mistress, fancy woman - an adulterous woman; a woman who has an ongoing extramarital sexual relationship with a man
odalisque - a woman slave in a harem
References in periodicals archive ?
Applying the analysis categories to the selected Acordao, we observe that the set of doxies that determines the speech situation in this pleading, acts by conditioning the subjects, who shape their word, without being fully aware of its dimension.
Yet the play ends in mirth as the rabble crowds round Macheath and he takes Polly for wife, standing "like the Turk, with his doxies around," while they dance and sing, and the chorus repeats the last couplet of the air:
One of the great battles for a planner is fighting the myths and ortho- doxies that grow rampant and unchecked in the collec- tive minds of clients and agencies alike.
Thus I stand like the Turk, with his doxies around From all sides their glances his passion confound For black, brown and fair, his inconstancy burns, And the different beauties subdue him by turns Each calls for her charms, to provoke his desires: Though willing to all; with but one he retires But think of this maxim, and put off your sorrow, The wretch of to-day maybe happy to-morrow (206)