dramatic monologue


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Related to dramatic monologue: soliloquy

dramatic monologue

n.
A literary, usually verse composition in which a speaker reveals his or her character, often in relation to a critical situation or event, in a monologue addressed to the reader or to a presumed listener.

dramat′ic mon′ologue


n.
a literary form in which a character, addressing a silent auditor at a critical moment, reveals himself or herself and the dramatic situation.
[1930–35]
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps no other nineteenth-century poet is so firmly and inexorably associated with a specific poetic genre as is Robert Browning with the dramatic monologue.
The dramatic monologue that Byron wrote is the unreported results of her meditations in the mountains, that she expressed to her father upon her return.
Dramatic Monologue as a Pragmatic Aspect and its Set Symbolic Connotations
A sample dramatic monologue of an adult son lambasting his father for being rude to an attendant: "Does that make you feel strong, Dad, huh?
Flowers" is his dramatic monologue written on the violation of social conventions and marital infidelity.
In a single paragraph, write a dramatic monologue that expresses the essence of your mask's character.
Among them are a few to stand with Donaghy's finest, such as the striking "Akhmatova Variations" and "From the Safe House" a dramatic monologue in the vein of "Black Ice and Rain" that revisits old relationships now consigned irrevocably to the past:
Finally, a discussion of One Word More enables us to explore Browning's (or his wife's) uneasiness with the dramatic monologue.
Bidart writes from an autobiographical perspective in intense lyric and dramatic monologue forms.
Long Beach competition winners were senior Angel Rayford - classical dramatic monologue from ``Hamlet,'' first place; senior Sandra Smith, contemporary comedic monologue from ``The Towel Lady,'' first place; senior Erick Reyes, contemporary dramatic monologue from ``Bang Bang You're Dead,'' first place; juniors Jennifer Haynes and Beverly Maravilla, classical comedic scene from Shakespeare's ``King Henry V,'' second place; and senior Lindsay Stovall, set design for ``Beauty and the Beast,'' third place.
The opera is essentially a dramatic monologue since we see only the woman and hear only her side of a 40-minute telephone conversation with her former lover.
By including her own poem, "loan of Arc: A Dramatic Monologue," in an appendix, Astell takes her place as an author in this debate, offering her own imaginative vision of a "Catholic" Joan as restitution.