drank


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drank

 (drăngk)
v.
Past tense of drink.

drank

(dræŋk)
vb
the past tense of drink

drink

(drɪŋk)

v. drank, drunk, often, drank, drink•ing, v.i.
1. to take a liquid into the mouth and swallow it.
2. to imbibe alcoholic drinks, esp. habitually or excessively; tipple.
3. to show one's respect, affection, or good wishes for someone or something by a ceremonious swallow of wine or other drink (usu. fol. by to).
v.t.
4. to take (a liquid) into the mouth and swallow.
5. to take in (a liquid) in any manner; absorb.
6. to take in through the senses, esp. with eagerness and pleasure (often fol. by in).
7. to swallow the contents of (a cup, glass, etc.).
8. to propose or participate in a toast to (a person or thing); toast: to drink one's health.
9. drink up, to drink the whole or rest of (a beverage).
n.
10. any liquid that is swallowed to quench thirst, for nourishment, etc.; beverage.
11. liquor; alcohol.
12. excessive indulgence in alcohol: Drink was his downfall.
13. a swallow or draft of liquid: a drink of water.
14. the drink, a large body of water, as a lake or the ocean: Her teammates threw her in the drink.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English drincan; c. Old Saxon drinkan, Old High German trinchan, Old Norse drekka, Gothic drigkan]
syn: drink, imbibe, sip refer to taking liquids into the mouth. They are also used figuratively in the sense of taking in something through the mind or the senses. drink is the general word: to drink coffee; to drink in the music. imbibe is a more formal word, used most often in a figurative sense but also in reference to liquids, esp. alcohol: to imbibe culture; to imbibe with discretion. sip implies drinking little by little: to sip a soda; to sip the words of Shakespeare.
usage: Confusion tends to arise regarding the forms for the past tense and past participle of drink. The standard past tense is drank: We drank our coffee. The standard past participle is drunk: Who has drunk all the milk? Yet drank has a long and respectable history in English as a past participle: Who has drank all the milk? While this construction still occurs in the speech of some educated persons, it is largely rejected, esp. as a written form. drunk as the past tense (We drunk our coffee) was once a standard variant but is now considered nonstandard, although it sometimes occurs in speech. See also drunk.
Translations

drank

pret de drink
References in classic literature ?
The old gentleman did not say much as he drank his four cups of tea, but he watched the young people, who soon chatted away like old friends, and the change in his grandson did not escape him.
He drank a glass of the wine and went out on the gallery and offered a glass to his wife.
The Dutch landed, and gave my people the fire- water; they drank until the heavens and the earth seemed to meet, and they foolishly thought they had found the Great Spirit.
The gentleman then ordered wine, which he and the carpenter drank together, in confirmation of their bargain.
To say the truth, there was much need of professional assistance, not merely for Hester herself, but still more urgently for the child -- who, drawing its sustenance from the maternal bosom, seemed to have drank in with it all the turmoil, the anguish and despair, which pervaded the mother's system.
The face that was close to mine was as white as the face against the glass, and out of it presently came a sound, not low nor weak, but as if from much further away, that I drank like a waft of fragrance.
But, doubtless, this noble savage fed strong and drank deep of the abounding element of air; and through his dilated nostrils snuffed in the sublime life of the worlds.
I boarded her once at midnight somewhere off the Patagonian coast, and drank good flip down in the forecastle.
I think he drank a good deal, and I am quite sure that the oftener he drank the worse it was for me.
There were some who drank it in as if it were an intoxicant; there were others who put their handkerchiefs to their faces.
don't make me too sick with any yer stuff,--my stomach is a leetle riled now;" and Tom drank half a glass of raw brandy.
Then she emptied the conveniences out of it and fetched it full of water, and I drank and then stood up, and she poured the rest down inside the armor.