drapery


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Related to drapery: curtains

drap·er·y

 (drā′pə-rē)
n. pl. drap·er·ies
1. Cloth or clothing gracefully arranged in loose folds.
2. A piece or pieces of heavy fabric hanging straight in loose folds, used as a curtain.
3. Cloth; fabric.
4. Chiefly British The business of a draper.

drapery

(ˈdreɪpərɪ)
n, pl -peries
1. (Textiles) fabric or clothing arranged and draped
2. (Textiles) (often plural) curtains or hangings that drape
3. (Textiles) Brit the occupation or shop of a draper
4. (Textiles) fabrics and cloth collectively
ˈdraperied adj

drap•er•y

(ˈdreɪ pə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. coverings, hangings, clothing, etc., of fabric, esp. as arranged in loose, graceful folds.
2. Usu., draperies. long curtains, often of heavy fabric.
3. the draping or arranging of hangings, clothing, etc., in graceful folds.
4. cloths or textile fabrics collectively.
5. Brit.
b. the stock, shop, or business of a draper.
[1250–1300; Middle English draperie < Old French, =drap (see drape) + -erie -ery]
drap′er•ied, adj.

drapery

dry goods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drapery - hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)drapery - hanging cloth used as a blind (especially for a window)
screen, blind - a protective covering that keeps things out or hinders sight; "they had just moved in and had not put up blinds yet"
drop cloth, drop curtain, drop - a curtain that can be lowered and raised onto a stage from the flies; often used as background scenery
eyelet, eyehole - a small hole (usually round and finished around the edges) in cloth or leather for the passage of a cord or hook or bar
festoon - a curtain of fabric draped and bound at intervals to form graceful curves
frontal - a drapery that covers the front of an altar
furnishing - (usually plural) the instrumentalities (furniture and appliances and other movable accessories including curtains and rugs) that make a home (or other area) livable
portiere - a heavy curtain hung across a doorway
shower curtain - a curtain that keeps water from splashing out of the shower area
theater curtain, theatre curtain - a hanging cloth that conceals the stage from the view of the audience; rises or parts at the beginning and descends or closes between acts and at the end of a performance
2.drapery - cloth gracefully draped and arranged in loose folds
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Translations
أقْمِشَه، سُجُفتِجارَةُ الأقْمِشَه
obchod s textilemzávěsy
draperigardinermanufakturhandeltekstilhandelvægtæppe
szövetboltszövetek
gluggatjöld, veggtjöldvefnaîarvöruverslun
obchod s textilom
kumaşcılıkmanifaturaperdelik kumaş

drapery

[ˈdreɪpərɪ] N
1. (= draper's shop) → pañería f, mercería f (LAm)
2. (= cloth for hanging) → colgaduras fpl; (as merchandise) → pañería f, mercería f (LAm)

drapery

n
(Brit: = cloth etc) → Stoff m; (= business: also drapery shop) → Stoffladen m
(= hangings)Draperie f (old); (on wall) → Behang m; (around bed etc) → Vorhänge pl; (clothing, fig liter) → Gewand nt

drapery

[ˈdreɪpərɪ] n (hanging folds) → drappeggio; (shop) → negozio di tessuti draperies npl (rich and heavy) → drappi mpl

drape

(dreip) verb
1. to hang cloth in folds (about). We draped the sofa in red velvet.
2. to hang in folds. We draped sheets over the boxes to hide them.
ˈdraper noun
a person who sells cloth, clothing etc.
ˈdraperyplural ˈdraperies noun
1. a draper's business.
2. cloth used for draping. walls hung with blue drapery.
drapes noun plural
(American) curtains.
References in classic literature ?
It was during these moments of deep silence that the canvas which concealed the entrance to a spacious marquee in the French encampment was shoved aside, and a man issued from beneath the drapery into the open air.
She inherited her mother's gift for devising drapery and costume.
The folds of the drapery, the fall of the curtains, had been arranged and rearranged, by Adolph and Rosa, with that nicety of eye which characterizes their race.
When we got back to the hotel, King Arthur's Round Table was ready for us in its white drapery, and the head waiter and his first assistant, in swallow-tails and white cravats, brought in the soup and the hot plates at once.
Folds of scarlet drapery shut in my view to the right hand; to the left were the clear panes of glass, protecting, but not separating me from the drear November day.
There was a carpet - a good one, but the pattern was obliterated by dust; a fireplace hung with cut-paper, dropping to pieces; a handsome oak-bedstead with ample crimson curtains of rather expensive material and modern make; but they had evidently experienced rough usage: the vallances hung in festoons, wrenched from their rings, and the iron rod supporting them was bent in an arc on one side, causing the drapery to trail upon the floor.
Monsieur Gabelle was the Postmaster, and some other taxing functionary united; he had come out with great obsequiousness to assist at this examination, and had held the examined by the drapery of his arm in an official manner.
To the jacket he added a short cloak, which scarcely reached half way down his thigh; it was of crimson cloth, though a good deal soiled, lined with bright yellow; and as he could transfer it from one shoulder to the other, or at his pleasure draw it all around him, its width, contrasted with its want of longitude, formed a fantastic piece of drapery.
The arrangement of the black hair on the pillow, the soft drapery, and the flowers placed there by the nurse to complete the artistic effect to which she had so confidently referred, were lost on him; he saw only a lifeless mask that had been his wife's face, and at sight of it his knees failed, and he had to lean for support on the rail at the foot of the bed.
Thirty first-rate pictures, uniformly framed, separated by bright drapery, ornamented the walls, which were hung with tapestry of severe design.
When Albert returned to his mother, he found her in the boudoir reclining in a large velvet arm-chair, the whole room so obscure that only the shining spangle, fastened here and there to the drapery, and the angles of the gilded frames of the pictures, showed with some degree of brightness in the gloom.
He crept from his hole and stood, hidden by the black drapery, beneath the scaffold.