drawer


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draw·er

 (drô′ər)
n.
1. One that draws, especially one that draws an order for the payment of money.
2. (also drôr) A boxlike compartment in furniture that can be pulled out and pushed in.
3. drawers (drôrz) Underpants.

drawer

(ˈdrɔːə)
n
1. (Professions) a person or thing that draws, esp a draughtsman
2. (Banking & Finance) a person who draws a cheque. See draw15
3. (Commerce) a person who draws up a commercial paper
4. (Commerce) archaic a person who draws beer, etc, in a bar
5. (Furniture) a boxlike container in a chest, table, etc, made for sliding in and out

draw•er

(drɔr for 1, 2; ˈdrɔ ər for 3-6 )

n.
1. a sliding, lidless, horizontal compartment, as in a piece of furniture, that may be drawn out in order to gain access to it.
2. drawers, (used with a pl. v.) a garment with legs that covers the lower half of the body, esp. an undergarment.
3. a person or thing that draws.
4. a person who draws a bill of exchange.
[1300–50]
draw′er•ful, n., pl. -fuls.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drawer - a boxlike container in a piece of furnituredrawer - a boxlike container in a piece of furniture; made so as to slide in and out
buffet, sideboard, counter - a piece of furniture that stands at the side of a dining room; has shelves and drawers
chest of drawers, dresser, bureau, chest - furniture with drawers for keeping clothes
chiffonier, commode - a tall elegant chest of drawers
container - any object that can be used to hold things (especially a large metal boxlike object of standardized dimensions that can be loaded from one form of transport to another)
desk - a piece of furniture with a writing surface and usually drawers or other compartments
lock - a fastener fitted to a door or drawer to keep it firmly closed
storage space - the area in any structure that provides space for storage
2.drawer - the person who writes a check or draft instructing the drawee to pay someone else
money dealer, money handler - a person who receives or invests or pays out money
3.drawer - an artist skilled at drawing
artist, creative person - a person whose creative work shows sensitivity and imagination
cartoonist - a person who draws cartoons
pavement artist - someone who draws on the pavement with colored chalks (hoping that passers-by will give them money)
sketcher - someone who draws sketches
Translations
جارور، دُرْجدُرْج
zásuvkašuplík
skuffe
asettajalaatikkopiirtäjäpöytälaatikkovetolaatikko
ladica
fiókkiállítórajzoló
skúffa
引き出し引出し
서랍
stalčius
atvilktne
predal
låda
ลิ้นชัก
ngăn kéo

drawer

1 [drɔːʳ] N (in desk etc) → cajón m
see also top E

drawer

2 [ˈdrɔːəʳ] N (Comm) → girador(a) m/f, librador(a) m/f

drawer

[ˈdrɔːr ˈdrɔːər] n
(for storage)tiroir m
[cheque] → tireur m

drawer

n
(in desk etc) → Schublade f ? chest1
(person: of pictures) → Zeichner(in) m(f)
(of cheque etc)Aussteller(in) m(f), → Trassant m (spec)
drawers pl (dated, hum, for men) → Unterhose(n) f(pl); (for women also) → Schlüpfer m

drawer

[drɔːʳ] n
a. (furniture) → cassetto
b. (of cheque) → traente m/f

drawer

(droː) noun
a sliding box without a lid which fits into a chest, table etc. the bottom drawer of my desk.

drawer

دُرْج zásuvka skuffe Schublade συρτάρι cajón pöytälaatikko tiroir ladica cassetto 引き出し 서랍 lade skuff szuflada gaveta выдвижной ящик låda ลิ้นชัก çekmece ngăn kéo 抽屉

drawer

n. gaveta, cajón.
References in classic literature ?
There was nothing to eat in the house, and so he went into a harness shop on a side street and stole a dollar and seventy-five cents out of the cash drawer.
First, every drawer in the tall, old-fashioned bureau is to be opened, with difficulty, and with a succession of spasmodic jerks then, all must close again, with the same fidgety reluctance.
Then he turned to the cash register, and punched up five cents, and began to pull money out of the drawer.
Hastily folding and directing this, she went to a drawer and made up a little package of clothing for her boy, which she tied with a handkerchief firmly round her waist; and, so fond is a mother's remembrance, that, even in the terrors of that hour, she did not forget to put in the little package one or two of his favorite toys, reserving a gayly painted parrot to amuse him, when she should be called on to awaken him.
Strictly speaking, ZUG means Pull, Tug, Draught, Procession, March, Progress, Flight, Direction, Expedition, Train, Caravan, Passage, Stroke, Touch, Line, Flourish, Trait of Character, Feature, Lineament, Chess-move, Organ-stop, Team, Whiff, Bias, Drawer, Propensity, Inhalation, Disposition: but that thing which it does NOT mean--when all its legitimate pennants have been hung on, has not been discovered yet.
He tottered to his secretary in the corner, repeated that lament again and again in heartbreaking tones, and got out of a drawer a paper, which he slowly tore to bits, scattering the bits absently in his track as he walked up and down the room, still grieving and lamenting.
I don' know as I cal'lated to be the makin' of any child," Miranda had said as she folded Aurelia's letter and laid it in the light-stand drawer.
Reed herself, at far intervals, visited it to review the contents of a certain secret drawer in the wardrobe, where were stored divers parchments, her jewel-casket, and a miniature of her deceased husband; and in those last words lies the secret of the red-room--the spell which kept it so lonely in spite of its grandeur.
She also got a trick of coming down early in the morning and lingering about the kitchen, as if she were expecting the arrival of something; and she had a small drawer in a cabinet in the library, which she would trifle over for hours, and whose key she took special care to remove when she left it.
She put it in the drawer where she keeps her account-books.
When the mail got successfully to Dover, in the course of the forenoon, the head drawer at the Royal George Hotel opened the coach-door as his custom was.
My mother was sitting by the fire, but poorly in health, and very low in spirits, looking at it through her tears, and desponding heavily about herself and the fatherless little stranger, who was already welcomed by some grosses of prophetic pins, in a drawer upstairs, to a world not at all excited on the subject of his arrival; my mother, I say, was sitting by the fire, that bright, windy March afternoon, very timid and sad, and very doubtful of ever coming alive out of the trial that was before her, when, lifting her eyes as she dried them, to the window opposite, she saw a strange lady coming up the garden.