dream vision


Also found in: Wikipedia.

dream vision

n.
A narrative poem, especially in medieval literature, in which the main character falls asleep and experiences events having allegorical, didactic, or moral significance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Xi has enthusiastically pursued what he has called a "great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation" with his China Dream vision.
Tzumi Dream Vision virtual reality headset available for $9.
Dvergatal, as a list, shows that Barney's point extends beyond the dream vision to the prophetic mode of poetry in general.
Shakespeare does not appear to borrow directly from Montaigne's writing on dreams, yet his dramatization of an ambiguous dream vision in The Winter's Tale is given special resonance when placed next to Montaigne's writing because both authors treat carefully the specific complexity of incorporating one's dreams into waking life while at once attempting to maintain a clear distinction between the two states.
In the end, in the Conclusion, the author thanks the reader for accompanying him on his dream vision quest and analysis, and charges him finally with classic advice: "Know thyself.
Killigrew concentrates on sorrow in the dream vision of "On the Birthday" and the forlorn voice of a neglected wife in Penelope to Ulysses.
Dream Vision executives unveiled new details on their massive dual theme park master plan that includes a man-made mountain and another theme park to be built in north Alabama.
But as somnia, Orual's dreams also fit within the classification of the religious and allegorical dream vision of the Middle Ages.
At the same time, he bequeaths his dream vision of happiness to his friends, who start envisioning their own variations of his dream after his death: Kwita dreams of a beautiful girlfriend, Omar of a mother, and Boubker of loving parents.
In addition, anodyne is cited as responsible for the dream vision of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Kubla Khan: Or, a Vision in a Dream" (1797), and laudanum produces a dreamlike state in Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium Eater (1821).
Spearing, for instance, is only able to explain it as a 'playful reversal' of Chaucer's precedent (1993, 219), while Judith Davidoff claims that Lydgate is developing a new, separate genre altogether, which she dubs 'the dream vision analogue' (1988, 89).
As in Revelation, disclosure arrives to the speaker in a vision, in Browning's poem a dream vision.