dream vision


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dream vision

n.
A narrative poem, especially in medieval literature, in which the main character falls asleep and experiences events having allegorical, didactic, or moral significance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dream Vision executives unveiled new details on their massive dual theme park master plan that includes a man-made mountain and another theme park to be built in north Alabama.
But as somnia, Orual's dreams also fit within the classification of the religious and allegorical dream vision of the Middle Ages.
In addition, anodyne is cited as responsible for the dream vision of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Kubla Khan: Or, a Vision in a Dream" (1797), and laudanum produces a dreamlike state in Thomas De Quincey's Confessions of an English Opium Eater (1821).
More straightforward biblical narratives are found in 'Joseph and Mary', 'The Angel Gabriel', and 'The Seven Virgins', though this last begins with a dream vision of seven virgins and ends with a symbolic rose.
As in Revelation, disclosure arrives to the speaker in a vision, in Browning's poem a dream vision.
I will begin with the Book of the Duchess, a poem in which the narrative structure portrays the relationship between dream and text as mutually edifying: the narrator's dream furnishes him with the key to understanding an old text, and the old text provides the key to the dream vision.
Now there is even Parent Coaching to support parents struggling to create the dream vision of their family.
The 30 youngsters taking part in "Architecture for Everyone" between February and April will explore various art forms and create a dream vision of their home city.
About 1330, French Cistercian monk Guillaume de Deguileville wrote Le Pelerinage de la vie humaine; in the early 15th century, someone rendered the octosyllabic allegorical dream vision into a closely literal English, The Pilgrimage of the Lyfe of the Manhode; in the early 17th century, one William Baspoole modernized and revised that translation into The Pilgrime.
The present article tries to answer the question whether it is possible to think of William Shakespeare's Hamlet as a dream vision in which the Ghost plays the role analogous to the Dreamer's supernatural guide, which is the situation we meet with in medieval dream visions, such as Chaucer's The book of the Duchess, or The Pearl.
What makes the novella different is that despite the historical grounding--Maria Sibylla really did travel unescorted to Surinam and witness the horrors of the Dutch slave trade--the novella works on the reader's mind more like a malarial dream vision coming at the reader in a series of vivid images as alive and detailed as the jungle they conjure: "Birds tear towards the sun.