dreariness


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drea·ry

 (drîr′ē)
adj. drea·ri·er, drea·ri·est
1. Dismal; bleak.
2. Boring; dull: dreary tasks.

[Middle English dreri, bloody, frightened, sad, from Old English drēorig, bloody, sad, from drēor, gore; see dhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

drea′ri·ly adv.
drea′ri·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dreariness - extreme dullness; lacking spirit or interest
dullness - the quality of lacking interestingness; "the stories were of a dullness to bring a buffalo to its knees"

dreariness

noun
Translations
كآبَه، غَم
chmurnostponurost
kedsomhedtristhedtrøstesløshed
sivárság
drungi
kasvetlilik

dreariness

[ˈdrɪərɪnɪs] N [of landscape, weather] → lo inhóspito; [of routine, job] → monotonía f, lo aburrido

dreariness

nTrostlosigkeit f; (of job, life)Eintönigkeit f

dreariness

[ˈdrɪərɪnɪs] n (of landscape, weather) → tetraggine f; (of life) → squallore m; (of book, speech) → monotonia

dreary

(ˈdriəri) adjective
1. gloomy. What dreary weather!
2. very dull. I've got to go to another dreary meeting tomorrow.
ˈdrearily adverb
ˈdreariness noun
References in classic literature ?
What tho' the moon - the white moon Shed all the splendour of her noon, Her smile is chilly - and her beam, In that time of dreariness, will seem(So like you gather in your breath) A portrait taken after death.
The charm of life was gone; there was nothing but dreariness left.
our summer atones with its mildness for the dreariness and perils of our winter; it has even given me a colour, pale-face as I am--I can feel it burn on my cheek.
Coming in from the eastward, the bright colouring of the lightship marking the part of the river committed to the charge of an Admiral(the Commander-in-Chief at the Nore) accentuates the dreariness and the great breadth of the Thames Estuary.
I didn't want to go back there--it would seem like going back into the chill and dreariness of the old life again.
The interior, in spite of the melody, struck upon the girl's senses with an unspeakable dreariness.
It would be useless to ask," says my Lady with the dreariness of the place in Lincolnshire still upon her, "whether anything has been done.
But Philip was impatient with himself; he called to mind his idea of the pattern of life: the unhappiness he had suffered was no more than part of a decoration which was elaborate and beautiful; he told himself strenuously that he must accept with gaiety everything, dreariness and excitement, pleasure and pain, because it added to the richness of the design.
Inside, the deadly dreariness, the close, oppressive solitude of a deserted dwelling wearied the eye and weighed on the mind, from the roof to the basement.
With a sinking heart, too, she realized something else: the dreariness of her own future now without Pollyanna.
Moreover, she became aware of all the dreariness of the world of sorrow, of sick and dying people, in which she had been living.
The pride and obstinacy of millers and other insignificant people, whom you pass unnoticingly on the road every day, have their tragedy too; but it is of that unwept, hidden sort that goes on from generation to generation, and leaves no record,--such tragedy, perhaps, as lies in the conflicts of young souls, hungry for joy, under a lot made suddenly hard to them, under the dreariness of a home where the morning brings no promise with it, and where the unexpectant discontent of worn and disappointed parents weighs on the children like a damp, thick air, in which all the functions of life are depressed; or such tragedy as lies in the slow or sudden death that follows on a bruised passion, though it may be a death that finds only a parish funeral.