drenching


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drench

 (drĕnch)
tr.v. drenched, drench·ing, drench·es
1. To wet through and through; soak.
2. To administer a large oral dose of liquid medicine to (an animal).
3. To provide with something in great abundance; surfeit: just drenched in money.
n.
1. The act of wetting or becoming wet through and through.
2. Something that drenches: a drench of rain.
3. A large dose of liquid medicine, especially one administered to an animal by pouring down the throat.

[Middle English drenchen, to drown, from Old English drencan, to give to drink, drown; see dhreg- in Indo-European roots.]

drench′er n.
Word History: Drink and drench mean quite different things today, but in fact they share similar origins, and, historically, similar meanings. Drink comes from a prehistoric Germanic verb *drinkan, from the Germanic root *drink- meaning "drink." Another form of this root, *drank-, could be combined with a suffix *-jan that was used to form causative verbs, in this case *drankjan, "to cause to drink." The descendant of the simple verb *drinkan in Old English was drincan (virtually unchanged), while the causative verb *drankjan was affected by certain sound shifts and became Old English drencan, pronounced (drĕn′chŏn), and, in Middle and Modern English, drench. In Middle English drench came to mean "to drown," a sense now obsolete; the sense "to steep, soak in liquid" and the current modern sense "to make thoroughly wet" developed by early Modern English times. Drink and drench are not the only such pairs in English, where one verb comes from a prehistoric Germanic causative; some others include sit and set ("to cause to sit"), lie and lay ("to cause to lie"), and fall and fell ("cause to fall").
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drenching - the act of making something completely wet; "he gave it a good drenching"
wetting - the act of making something wet
Translations

drenching

[ˈdrentʃɪŋ]
A. ADJ [rain] → torrencial
B. N to get a drenchingempaparse

drenching

n to get a drenchingbis auf die Haut nass werden
adj he’s been working out in the drenching rain all dayer hat den ganzen Tag draußen im strömenden Regen gearbeitet

drenching

[ˈdrɛntʃɪŋ]
1. adj (rain) → torrenziale
2. n to get a drenchinginzupparsi fino all'osso
References in classic literature ?
Now she remembered the little umbrella, which she had forgotten to take in her hurry to be off, but regret was unavailing, and nothing could be done but borrow one or submit to to a drenching.
Aside from being caught in a drenching storm and one or two minor accidents, nothing else of moment marked the remainder of the river journey, and at the end of the third day the canoes pulled to shore and a night camp was made.
When he came to himself, the fire was gone out, his clothes were wet with the chill and drenching dews; but the dread soul-crisis was past, and, in the joy that filled him, he no longer felt hunger, cold, degradation, disappointment, wretchedness.
But water was preferable to fire, and still the stampede from the windows continued, and still the pitiless drenching assailed it until the building was empty; then the fireboys mounted to the hall and flooded it with water enough to annihilate forty times as much fire as there was there; for a village fire company does not often get a chance to show off, and so when it does get a chance, it makes the most of it.
And as for the cow you've bought, bargain or no bargain, I've been at the drenching of her--contradick me who will.
The Beaches of Lukannon--the winter wheat so tall-- The dripping, crinkled lichens, and the sea-fog drenching all
Still their unnatural burden bumped from side to side; and now the head would be laid, as if in confidence, upon their shoulders, and now the drenching sack-cloth would flap icily about their faces.
He took the wand with which he seals men's eyes in sleep or wakes them just as he pleases, and flew holding it in his hand over Pieria; then he swooped down through the firmament till he reached the level of the sea, whose waves he skimmed like a cormorant that flies fishing every hole and corner of the ocean, and drenching its thick plumage in the spray.
And the characteristic aspect of westerly weather, the thick, gray, smoky and sinister tone sets in, circumscribing the view of the men, drenching their bodies, oppressing their souls, taking their breath away with booming gusts, deafening, blinding, driving, rushing them onwards in a swaying ship towards our coasts lost in mists and rain.
Six in the morning saw Bobby at the Tonga Office in the drenching rain, the whirl of the last waltz still in his ears, and an intoxication due neither to wine nor waltzing in his brain.