drenching


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drench

 (drĕnch)
tr.v. drenched, drench·ing, drench·es
1. To wet through and through; soak.
2. To administer a large oral dose of liquid medicine to (an animal).
3. To provide with something in great abundance; surfeit: just drenched in money.
n.
1. The act of wetting or becoming wet through and through.
2. Something that drenches: a drench of rain.
3. A large dose of liquid medicine, especially one administered to an animal by pouring down the throat.

[Middle English drenchen, to drown, from Old English drencan, to give to drink, drown; see dhreg- in Indo-European roots.]

drench′er n.
Word History: Drink and drench mean quite different things today, but in fact they share similar origins, and, historically, similar meanings. Drink comes from a prehistoric Germanic verb *drinkan, from the Germanic root *drink- meaning "drink." Another form of this root, *drank-, could be combined with a suffix *-jan that was used to form causative verbs, in this case *drankjan, "to cause to drink." The descendant of the simple verb *drinkan in Old English was drincan (virtually unchanged), while the causative verb *drankjan was affected by certain sound shifts and became Old English drencan, pronounced (drĕn′chŏn), and, in Middle and Modern English, drench. In Middle English drench came to mean "to drown," a sense now obsolete; the sense "to steep, soak in liquid" and the current modern sense "to make thoroughly wet" developed by early Modern English times. Drink and drench are not the only such pairs in English, where one verb comes from a prehistoric Germanic causative; some others include sit and set ("to cause to sit"), lie and lay ("to cause to lie"), and fall and fell ("cause to fall").
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drenching - the act of making something completely wet; "he gave it a good drenching"
wetting - the act of making something wet
Translations

drenching

[ˈdrentʃɪŋ]
A. ADJ [rain] → torrencial
B. N to get a drenchingempaparse

drenching

n to get a drenchingbis auf die Haut nass werden
adj he’s been working out in the drenching rain all dayer hat den ganzen Tag draußen im strömenden Regen gearbeitet

drenching

[ˈdrɛntʃɪŋ]
1. adj (rain) → torrenziale
2. n to get a drenchinginzupparsi fino all'osso
References in classic literature ?
The Beaches of Lukannon--the winter wheat so tall-- The dripping, crinkled lichens, and the sea-fog drenching all
Only then he suddenly awoke to the fact that he had been wrong about the weather and the rain was drenching his hay.
A violent shower was not long in drenching our travellers.
Trunk injections, in general, are a more efficient delivery method than soil drenching and foliar application.
THE public drenching given to former Tranmere manager Ronnie Moore by a Prenton Park pitch sprinkler on Good Friday was not the result of a groundstaff prank, the groundstaff say
and, despite all that "Greek yogurt" drenching, less than a gram of protein.