drenching

(redirected from drenchings)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

drench

 (drĕnch)
tr.v. drenched, drench·ing, drench·es
1. To wet through and through; soak.
2. To administer a large oral dose of liquid medicine to (an animal).
3. To provide with something in great abundance; surfeit: just drenched in money.
n.
1. The act of wetting or becoming wet through and through.
2. Something that drenches: a drench of rain.
3. A large dose of liquid medicine, especially one administered to an animal by pouring down the throat.

[Middle English drenchen, to drown, from Old English drencan, to give to drink, drown; see dhreg- in Indo-European roots.]

drench′er n.
Word History: Drink and drench mean quite different things today, but in fact they share similar origins, and, historically, similar meanings. Drink comes from a prehistoric Germanic verb *drinkan, from the Germanic root *drink- meaning "drink." Another form of this root, *drank-, could be combined with a suffix *-jan that was used to form causative verbs, in this case *drankjan, "to cause to drink." The descendant of the simple verb *drinkan in Old English was drincan (virtually unchanged), while the causative verb *drankjan was affected by certain sound shifts and became Old English drencan, pronounced (drĕn′chŏn), and, in Middle and Modern English, drench. In Middle English drench came to mean "to drown," a sense now obsolete; the sense "to steep, soak in liquid" and the current modern sense "to make thoroughly wet" developed by early Modern English times. Drink and drench are not the only such pairs in English, where one verb comes from a prehistoric Germanic causative; some others include sit and set ("to cause to sit"), lie and lay ("to cause to lie"), and fall and fell ("cause to fall").
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drenching - the act of making something completely wet; "he gave it a good drenching"
wetting - the act of making something wet
Translations

drenching

[ˈdrentʃɪŋ]
A. ADJ [rain] → torrencial
B. N to get a drenchingempaparse

drenching

n to get a drenchingbis auf die Haut nass werden
adj he’s been working out in the drenching rain all dayer hat den ganzen Tag draußen im strömenden Regen gearbeitet

drenching

[ˈdrɛntʃɪŋ]
1. adj (rain) → torrenziale
2. n to get a drenchinginzupparsi fino all'osso
References in classic literature ?
The repeated drenchings in the icy water had likewise had their effect on him.
Poor devils, many of them were maimed, hacked, carved, in a frightful way; and their hair, their faces, their clothing, were caked with black and stiffened drenchings of blood.
The Beaches of Lukannon--the winter wheat so tall-- The dripping, crinkled lichens, and the sea-fog drenching all
Besides, supposing we are loaded with powder barrels aft and lucifers forward; how the devil could the lucifers get afire in this drenching spray here?
And the characteristic aspect of westerly weather, the thick, gray, smoky and sinister tone sets in, circumscribing the view of the men, drenching their bodies, oppressing their souls, taking their breath away with booming gusts, deafening, blinding, driving, rushing them onwards in a swaying ship towards our coasts lost in mists and rain.
Only then he suddenly awoke to the fact that he had been wrong about the weather and the rain was drenching his hay.
Six in the morning saw Bobby at the Tonga Office in the drenching rain, the whirl of the last waltz still in his ears, and an intoxication due neither to wine nor waltzing in his brain.
Aside from being caught in a drenching storm and one or two minor accidents, nothing else of moment marked the remainder of the river journey, and at the end of the third day the canoes pulled to shore and a night camp was made.
The passengers were huddled about the smoke-stacks and fortified behind ventilators, and all were wrapped in wintry costumes and looking sleepy and unhappy in the pitiless gale and the drenching spray.