dressmaker


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dress·mak·er

 (drĕs′mā′kər)
n.
One that makes women's clothing, especially dresses.

dress′mak′ing n.

dressmaker

(ˈdrɛsˌmeɪkə)
n
(Knitting & Sewing) a person whose occupation is making clothes, esp for women
ˈdressˌmaking n

dress•mak•er

(ˈdrɛsˌmeɪ kər)

n.
1. a person whose occupation is the making or alteration of women's dresses, coats, etc.
adj.
2. (of women's clothing) having soft lines and sometimes much fine detail.
[1795–1805]
dress′mak`ing, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dressmaker - someone who makes or mends dressesdressmaker - someone who makes or mends dresses  
garment worker, garmentmaker, garment-worker - a person who makes garments

dressmaker

noun seamstress, tailor, couturier, sewing woman, modiste She used to be a dressmaker.
Translations
خَيّاط لِمَلابِس النِّساء
švadlena
dameskrædder
kjólasaumari
damski krojač
kadın terzisi

dressmaker

[ˈdresmeɪkəʳ] Nmodista f, costurera f

dressmaker

[ˈdrɛsmeɪkər] ncouturier/ière m/f

dressmaker

[ˈdrɛsˌmeɪkəʳ] nsarto/a

dress

(dres) verb
1. to put clothes or a covering on. We dressed in a hurry and my wife dressed the children.
2. to prepare (food etc) to be eaten. She dressed a salad.
3. to treat and bandage (wounds). He was sent home from hospital after his burns had been dressed.
noun
1. what one is wearing or dressed in. He has strange tastes in dress.
2. a piece of women's clothing with a top and skirt in one piece. Shall I wear a dress or a blouse and skirt?
dressed adjective
wearing (clothes). Don't come in – I'm not dressed!; She was dressed in black; Get dressed immediately; a well-dressed man.
ˈdresser noun
1. a kitchen sideboard for holding dishes.
2. (American) a chest of drawers for holding clothes sometimes with a mirror.
ˈdressing noun
1. something put on as a covering. We gave the rose-bed a dressing of manure.
2. a sauce added especially to salads. oil and vinegar dressing.
3. a bandage etc used to dress a wound. He changed the patient's dressing.
ˈdressing-gown noun
a loose garment worn over pyjamas etc.
ˈdressing-room noun
a room (in a theatre etc) for actors etc to change in.
ˈdressing-table noun
a table in a bedroom with a mirror and drawers.
ˈdressmaker noun
a person who makes clothes for women.
dress rehearsal
a full rehearsal of a play etc with costumes etc.
dress up
to put on special clothes, eg fancy dress. He dressed up as a clown for the party.
References in classic literature ?
But when the brief solace afforded them by the modiste and dressmaker was past, there seemed little else to be gained.
Soon I asked her "if there were any dressmaker or plain-workwoman in the village?
A dressmaker, always stabbed in the breast with a needle and thread, boards and lodges in the house; and seems to me, eating, drinking, or sleeping, never to take her thimble off.
For you were in truth a very hard-working little dressmaker, and I well remember how impressed I was to sit beside you, as you plied your needle on some gown that must be finished by the evening, and meditate on the quaint contrast between your almost Puritanic industry and your innocent love of pleasure.
I had to raise L500 last month on Franklands; and it is too bad if I must raise more to pay your dressmaker.
I believe he married Lady Radley's maid, and has established her in Paris as an English dressmaker.
Her gowns, bonnets, and chiffons were all cut and made by the dressmaker and the milliner of Alencon, two hump-backed sisters, who were not without some taste.
Yet every dim little star revolving about her, from her maid to the manager of the Italian Opera, knows her weaknesses, prejudices, follies, haughtinesses, and caprices and lives upon as accurate a calculation and as nice a measure of her moral nature as her dressmaker takes of her physical proportions.
Allen's fears on the delay of an expected dressmaker, and having only one minute in sixty to bestow even on the reflection of her own felicity, in being already engaged for the evening.
In her tight black dress, made by the dressmaker down the street, with her wrinkled face and pale tired eyes, her gray hair still done in the frivolous ringlets of her youth, she was a ridiculous but strangely pathetic figure.
After she had gone, a dressmaker from Madame Suppert-Roguet waited on the Rostovs, and Natasha, very glad of this diversion, having shut herself into a room adjoining the drawing room, occupied herself trying on the new dresses.
And besides, if a woman really repents, she has to go to a bad dressmaker, otherwise no one believes in her.