dried


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Related to dried: dried fruit

dried

 (drīd)
v.
Past tense and past participle of dry.

dried

(draɪd)
vb
the past tense and past participle of dry

dry

(draɪ)

adj. dri•er, dri•est, adj.
1. free from moisture or excess moisture; not moist; not wet.
2. having or characterized by little or no rain: the dry season.
3. characterized by absence, deficiency, or failure of natural or ordinary moisture.
4. not under, in, or on water: to be on dry land.
5. not now containing or yielding water or other liquid; depleted or empty of liquid: The well is dry.
6. not yielding milk: a dry cow.
7. free from tears: dry eyes.
8. drained or evaporated away: a dry river.
9. desiring drink; thirsty.
10. causing thirst: dry work.
11. served or eaten without butter, jam, etc.: dry toast.
12. (of bread, rolls, etc.) stale.
13. of or pertaining to nonliquid substances or commodities: dry measure; dry provisions.
14. dehydrated.
15. (esp. of wines) not sweet.
16. (of a cocktail) made with dry vermouth, esp. a relatively small amount.
17. characterized by or favoring prohibition of the manufacture and sale of alcoholic liquors for use in beverages: a dry state.
18. free from the use of alcoholic drink; sober.
19. plain; bald; unadorned: dry facts.
20. dull; uninteresting: a dry subject.
21. expressed in a straight-faced, matter-of-fact way: dry humor.
22. indifferent; cold; unemotional: a dry answer.
23. unproductive: The greatest of artists have dry years.
24. (of lumber) fully seasoned.
25.
a. (of masonry construction) built without fresh mortar or cement.
b. (of a wall, ceiling, etc., in an interior) finished without the use of fresh plaster.
v.t.
26. to make dry; free from moisture: to dry the dishes.
v.i.
27. to become dry; lose moisture.
28. dry out, to undergo detoxification after drug or alcohol abuse.
29. dry up,
a. to cease to exist; evaporate.
b. Informal. to stop talking.
c. (in acting) to forget one's lines or part.
n.
30. a prohibitionist.
31. a dry area.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English drȳge; akin to Middle Dutch drōghe, Old High German trockan; compare drought]
dry′a•ble, adj.
dry′ly, adv.
dry′ness, n.
syn: dry, arid both mean without moisture. dry is the general word indicating absence of water or freedom from moisture, which may be favorable or unfavorable: a dry well; a dry bath towel. arid suggests intense dryness in a region or climate, resulting in bareness or in barrenness: arid tracts of desert.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dried - not still wet; "the ink has dried"; "a face marked with dried tears"
dry - free from liquid or moisture; lacking natural or normal moisture or depleted of water; or no longer wet; "dry land"; "dry clothes"; "a dry climate"; "dry splintery boards"; "a dry river bed"; "the paint is dry"
2.dried - preserved by removing natural moisture; "dried beef"; "dried fruit"; "dehydrated eggs"; "shredded and desiccated coconut meat"
preserved - prevented from decaying or spoiling and prepared for future use

dried

adjective dehydrated, dry, dried-up, desiccated fresh or dried herbs
Translations
sušený
tørret
kuivattu
osušen
aszalt
òurrka
乾燥させた
말린
posušen
torkad
แห้ง
kurukurutulmuş
đã khô

dried

[draɪd]
A. PT & PP of dry
B. ADJ [flowers, mushrooms, lentils] → seco; [milk] → en polvo
C. CPD dried fruit(s) Nfrutas fpl pasas

dried

[ˈdraɪd] adj
[fruit, beans] → sec(sèche)
dried flowers → fleurs séchées
[eggs, milk] → en poudredried fruit n (sultanas, raisins, currants)fruits mpl secsdried-up [ˌdraɪdˈʌp] adj
[person] → desséché(e)
[grass, plant] → desséché(e)
(= dry) [river, lake, well] → tari(e)

dried

pret, ptp of dry
adj vegetables, herbs, apricots etcgetrocknet; bloodeingetrocknet; dried yeastTrockenhefe f; dried eggTrockenei nt, → Eipulver nt; dried milkTrockenmilch f, → Milchpulver nt

dried

:
dried flowers
plTrockenblumen pl
dried fruit
nDörrobst nt, → Backobst nt

dried

[draɪd] adj (fruit, beans, flowers, herbs) → secco/a; (milk,eggs) → in polvere; (soup) → liofilizzato/a

dry

(drai) adjective
1. having little, or no, moisture, sap, rain etc. The ground is very dry; The leaves are dry and withered; I need to find dry socks for the children.
2. uninteresting and not lively. a very dry book.
3. (of humour or manner) quiet, restrained. a dry wit.
4. (of wine) not sweet.
verbpast tense, past participle dried
to (cause to) become dry. I prefer drying dishes to washing them; The clothes dried quickly in the sun.
dried adjective
(of food) having had moisture removed for the purpose of preservation. dried flowers; dried fruit.
ˈdrier, ˈdryer noun
a machine etc that dries. a spin-drier; a hair-dryer.
ˈdrily, ˈdryly adverb
in a quiet, restrained (and humorous) manner. He commented drily on the untidiness of the room.
ˈdryness noun
ˌdry-ˈclean verb
to clean (clothes etc) with chemicals, not with water.
dry land
the land as opposed to the sea etc.
dry off
to make or become completely dry. She climbed out of the swimming-pool and dried off in the sun.
dry up
1. to lose water; to cease running etc completely. All the rivers dried up in the heat.
2. to become used up. Supplies of bandages have dried up.
3. to make dry. The sun dried up the puddles in the road.
4. (of a speaker) to forget what he is going to say. He dried up in the middle of his speech.

dried

مُجَفَّف sušený tørret getrocknet αποξηραμένος seco kuivattu séché osušen secco 乾燥させた 말린 gedroogd tørket suszony seco высушенный torkad แห้ง kuru đã khô 干的

dried

pret & pp de dry
References in classic literature ?
Not long after, he went to the daughter who had married the tilemaker, and likewise inquired of her how she fared; she replied, "I want for nothing, and have only one wish, that the dry weather may continue, and the sun shine hot and bright, so that the bricks might be dried.
But I found an excellent use for these grapes; and that was, to cure or dry them in the sun, and keep them as dried grapes or raisins are kept, which I thought would be, as indeed they were, wholesome and agreeable to eat when no grapes could be had.
I thought I should have died, and made my peace with God, forgiving all men, even my uncle and the fishers; and as soon as I had thus made up my mind to the worst, clearness came upon me; I observed the night was falling dry; my clothes were dried a good deal; truly, I was in a better case than ever before, since I had landed on the isle; and so I got to sleep at last, with a thought of gratitude.
The cave, being formed, is well lined with dry grass, bark, sticks, and poles, and occasionally a dried hide.
It is well known what a difference there is in the buoyancy of green and seasoned timber; and it occurred to me that floods might wash down plants or branches, and that these might be dried on the banks, and then by a fresh rise in the stream be washed into the sea.
My dress is dry enough, but I won't feel real comfor'ble till I get my feet dried.
The wet wood which I had placed near the heat dried and itself became inflamed.
There were women grinding dried plantain in crude stone mortars, while others were fashioning cakes from the powdered flour.
As for the dogs, they ate but once a day, and then rarely did they receive more than a pound each of dried fish.
Mowgli, who had never known what real hunger meant, fell back on stale honey, three years old, scraped out of deserted rock-hives--honey black as a sloe, and dusty with dried sugar.
As for that dried up one, there, he hasn't a gill in his whole carcase.
Their duration, however, is but limited; they require frequently to be hauled out of the water and dried, to prevent the hides from becoming water-soaked; and they eventually rot and go to pieces.