drier


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Related to drier: drive

dri·er 1

also dry·er  (drī′ər)
n.
1. One that dries.
2. A substance added to paint, varnish, or ink to speed drying.

dri·er 2

 (drī′ər)
adj.
A comparative of dry.

drier

(ˈdraɪə)
adj
a comparative of dry

drier

(ˈdraɪə)
n
a variant spelling of dryer

dri•er1

(ˈdraɪ ər)

n.
1. one that dries.
2. any additive to speed the drying of paints, printing inks, etc.
[1300–50]

dri•er2

(ˈdraɪ ər)

adj.
comparative of dry.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drier - a substance that promotes drying (e.g., calcium oxide absorbs water and is used to remove moisture)
chemical agent - an agent that produces chemical reactions
2.drier - an appliance that removes moisturedrier - an appliance that removes moisture  
appliance - durable goods for home or office use
clothes drier, clothes dryer - a dryer that dries clothes wet from washing
blow drier, blow dryer, hair drier, hair dryer, hand blower - a hand-held electric blower that can blow warm air onto the hair; used for styling hair
Translations
sušičvysoušeč
tørretumbler
szárító
òurrkari
sušičsušička
sušilniksušilnik za lase

dry

(drai) adjective
1. having little, or no, moisture, sap, rain etc. The ground is very dry; The leaves are dry and withered; I need to find dry socks for the children.
2. uninteresting and not lively. a very dry book.
3. (of humour or manner) quiet, restrained. a dry wit.
4. (of wine) not sweet.
verbpast tense, past participle dried
to (cause to) become dry. I prefer drying dishes to washing them; The clothes dried quickly in the sun.
dried adjective
(of food) having had moisture removed for the purpose of preservation. dried flowers; dried fruit.
ˈdrier, ˈdryer noun
a machine etc that dries. a spin-drier; a hair-dryer.
ˈdrily, ˈdryly adverb
in a quiet, restrained (and humorous) manner. He commented drily on the untidiness of the room.
ˈdryness noun
ˌdry-ˈclean verb
to clean (clothes etc) with chemicals, not with water.
dry land
the land as opposed to the sea etc.
dry off
to make or become completely dry. She climbed out of the swimming-pool and dried off in the sun.
dry up
1. to lose water; to cease running etc completely. All the rivers dried up in the heat.
2. to become used up. Supplies of bandages have dried up.
3. to make dry. The sun dried up the puddles in the road.
4. (of a speaker) to forget what he is going to say. He dried up in the middle of his speech.
References in classic literature ?
It is not so buried in trees,' I replied, 'and it is not quite so large, but you can see the country beautifully all round; and the air is healthier for you - fresher and drier.
Stryver, already fast shouldering his way to a large and lucrative practice, behind his compeers in this particular, any more than in the drier parts of the legal race.
No," said Moncharmin in a drier tone than ever, "no, that's impossible.
Four times did the botas bear being uplifted, but the fifth it was all in vain, for they were drier and more sapless than a rush by that time, which made the jollity that had been kept up so far begin to flag.
She knew a dozen places where lions laired, and every drinking hole in the drier country twenty-five miles back from the river.
It was some time before my blank astonishment would let me struggle up the bank to a drier position, or think at all of my imminent peril.
This was the first fruit she had seen there, and the last she was ever likely to see; and unless she ate it up immediately, it would grow drier than it already was, and be wholly unfit to eat.
And certain it is, that the light that a man receiveth by counsel from another, is drier and purer, than that which cometh from his own understanding and judgment; which is ever infused, and drenched, in his affections and customs.
But having once decided to try the higher and drier levels, she pressed back eastward, marching afoot towards the village of Chalk-Newton, where she meant to pass the night.
cried Monica, the smaller, the drier, and the more wizened of the pair.
Alleyne, glancing round for shelter, saw a thick and lofty holly-bush, so hollowed out beneath that no house could have been drier.
The older part of the camp consisted almost wholly of trenches, as though this had been the original form of dwellings which was slowly giving way to the drier and airier surface domiciles.