drift


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Related to drift: Drift velocity, drift current

drift

 (drĭft)
v. drift·ed, drift·ing, drifts
v.intr.
1. To be carried along by currents of air or water: a balloon drifting eastward; as the wreckage drifted toward shore.
2. To proceed or move unhurriedly or aimlessly: drifting among the party guests; a day laborer, drifting from town to town.
3. To live or behave without a clear purpose or goal: drifted through his college years unable to decide on a career.
4. To have no continuing focus; stray: My attention drifted during the boring presentation.
5. To vary from or oscillate randomly about a fixed setting, position, or mode of operation.
6. To be piled up in banks or heaps by the force of a current: snow drifting to five feet.
v.tr.
1. To cause to be carried in a current: drifting the logs downstream.
2. To pile up in banks or heaps: Wind drifted the loose straw against the barn.
3. Western US To drive (livestock) slowly or far afield, especially for grazing.
n.
1. Something moving along in a current of air or water: a drift of logs in the river.
2. A bank or pile, as of sand or snow, heaped up by currents of air or water.
3. Geology Rock debris transported and deposited by or from ice, especially by or from a glacier.
4.
a. A general trend or tendency, as of opinion. See Synonyms at tendency.
b. General meaning or purport; tenor: caught the drift of the conversation.
5.
a. A gradual change in position: an iceberg's eastward drift.
b. A gradual deviation from an original course, model, method, or intention.
c. Variation or random oscillation about a fixed setting, position, or mode of behavior.
6. A gradual change in the output of a circuit or amplifier.
7. The rate of flow of a water current.
8.
a. A tool for ramming or driving something down.
b. A tapered steel pin for enlarging and aligning holes.
9.
a. A horizontal or nearly horizontal passageway in a mine running through or parallel to a vein.
b. A secondary mine passageway between two main shafts or tunnels.
10. A drove or herd, especially of swine.

[From Middle English, drove, herd, act of driving; see dhreibh- in Indo-European roots.]

drift′y adj.

drift

(drɪft)
vb (mainly intr)
1. (also tr) to be carried along by or as if by currents of air or water or (of a current) to carry (a vessel, etc) along
2. to move aimlessly from place to place or from one activity to another
3. to wander or move gradually away from a fixed course or point; stray
4. (Physical Geography) (also tr) (of snow, sand, etc) to accumulate in heaps or banks or to drive (snow, sand, etc) into heaps or banks
n
5. something piled up by the wind or current, such as a snowdrift
6. tendency, trend, meaning, or purport: the drift of the argument.
7. a state of indecision or inaction
8. (Navigation) the extent to which a vessel, aircraft, projectile, etc is driven off its course by adverse winds, tide, or current
9. (Physical Geography) a general tendency of surface ocean water to flow in the direction of the prevailing winds: North Atlantic Drift.
10. a driving movement, force, or influence; impulse
11. (Motor Racing) a controlled four-wheel skid, used by racing drivers to take bends at high speed
12. (Geological Science) a loose unstratified deposit of sand, gravel, etc, esp one transported and deposited by a glacier or ice sheet
13. (Mining & Quarrying) a horizontal passage in a mine that follows the mineral vein
14. (Agriculture) something, esp a group of animals, driven along by human or natural agencies: a drift of cattle.
15. (Tools) Also called: driftpin a tapering steel tool driven into holes to enlarge or align them before bolting or riveting
16. (Electrical Engineering) an uncontrolled slow change in some operating characteristic of a piece of equipment, esp an electronic circuit or component
17. (Linguistics) linguistics gradual change in a language, esp in so far as this is influenced by the internal structure of the language rather than by contact with other languages
18. (Human Geography) South African a ford
19. (General Engineering) engineering a copper or brass bar used as a punch
[C13: from Old Norse: snowdrift; related to Old High German trift pasturage]
ˈdrifty adj

drift

(drɪft)

n.
1. a driving movement or action.
2. (of a ship) the component of the movement that is due to the force of wind and currents.
3. a broad, shallow ocean current that advances at the rate of 10 to 15 mi. (16 to 24 km) a day.
4. the flow or the speed in knots of an ocean current.
5. a gradual deviation from a natural or desirable position or course.
6. the course along which something moves; tendency; aim: a drift toward the political right.
7. a meaning; intent; purport: the drift of a statement.
8. the state or process of being driven.
9. something driven, as animals or rain.
10. a heap of any matter driven together.
11. a snowdrift.
12. loose material, as gravel, sand, etc., transported and deposited by glacial ice or meltwater.
14. a gradual change in some operating characteristic of a circuit, tube, or other electronic device, as an effect of warming up or of continued use.
15. gradual change in the structure of a language.
16.
a. a round tapering piece of steel for enlarging holes in metal or for bringing holes in line to receive rivets or bolts.
b. a flat tapered piece of steel used to drive tools with tapered shanks, as drill bits, from their holders.
17. an approximately horizontal passageway in underground mining.
18. the gradual deviation of a rocket or guided missile from its intended trajectory.
v.i.
19. to be carried along, as by currents of water or by the force of circumstances.
20. to wander aimlessly: to drift from town to town.
21. to be driven into heaps, as by the wind.
22. to deviate or vary, as from a proper position or set course.
Idioms:
drift off, to fall asleep gradually.
v.t.
23. to carry along: The current drifted the boat to sea.
24. to drive into heaps.
[1250–1300; Middle English drift, n. derivative of Old English drīfan to drive]
drift′ing•ly, adv.
drift′y, adj. drift•i•er, drift•i•est.

drift

In ballistics, a shift in projectile direction due to gyroscopic action which results from gravitational and atmospherically induced torques on the spinning projectile.

Drift

 a number of animals driven or moving along in a body; a mass of matter driven forward. See also creaght, drive.
Examples: drift of anglers; of bees; of birds; of cattle, 1613; of dust, 1725; of fishers—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486; of fishing nets, 1834; of gold, 1645; of hogs; of ice; of lace, 1889; of leaves of trees, 1600; of men, 1450; of oxen, 1552; of piles, 1721; of quailes, 1613; of rain, 1300; of sand, 1634; of sheep, 1816; of smoke, 1842; of snow, 1300; of swans; of swine [tame]—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486; of wood [floating in the sea], 1627.

drift


Past participle: drifted
Gerund: drifting

Imperative
drift
drift
Present
I drift
you drift
he/she/it drifts
we drift
you drift
they drift
Preterite
I drifted
you drifted
he/she/it drifted
we drifted
you drifted
they drifted
Present Continuous
I am drifting
you are drifting
he/she/it is drifting
we are drifting
you are drifting
they are drifting
Present Perfect
I have drifted
you have drifted
he/she/it has drifted
we have drifted
you have drifted
they have drifted
Past Continuous
I was drifting
you were drifting
he/she/it was drifting
we were drifting
you were drifting
they were drifting
Past Perfect
I had drifted
you had drifted
he/she/it had drifted
we had drifted
you had drifted
they had drifted
Future
I will drift
you will drift
he/she/it will drift
we will drift
you will drift
they will drift
Future Perfect
I will have drifted
you will have drifted
he/she/it will have drifted
we will have drifted
you will have drifted
they will have drifted
Future Continuous
I will be drifting
you will be drifting
he/she/it will be drifting
we will be drifting
you will be drifting
they will be drifting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been drifting
you have been drifting
he/she/it has been drifting
we have been drifting
you have been drifting
they have been drifting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been drifting
you will have been drifting
he/she/it will have been drifting
we will have been drifting
you will have been drifting
they will have been drifting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been drifting
you had been drifting
he/she/it had been drifting
we had been drifting
you had been drifting
they had been drifting
Conditional
I would drift
you would drift
he/she/it would drift
we would drift
you would drift
they would drift
Past Conditional
I would have drifted
you would have drifted
he/she/it would have drifted
we would have drifted
you would have drifted
they would have drifted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drift - a force that moves something alongdrift - a force that moves something along  
force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"
2.drift - the gradual departure from an intended course due to external influences (as a ship or plane)
aeroplane, airplane, plane - an aircraft that has a fixed wing and is powered by propellers or jets; "the flight was delayed due to trouble with the airplane"
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
leeway - (of a ship or plane) sideways drift
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
3.drift - a process of linguistic change over a period of time
melioration - the linguistic process in which over a period of time a word grows more positive in connotation or more elevated in meaning
linguistic process - a process involved in human language
4.drift - a large mass of material that is heaped up by the wind or by water currents
drumlin - a mound of glacial drift
mass - a body of matter without definite shape; "a huge ice mass"
snowdrift - a mass of snow heaped up by the wind
5.drift - a general tendency to change (as of opinion); "not openly liberal but that is the trend of the book"; "a broad movement of the electorate to the right"
inclination, tendency, disposition - an attitude of mind especially one that favors one alternative over others; "he had an inclination to give up too easily"; "a tendency to be too strict"
evolutionary trend - a general direction of evolutionary change
gravitation - a figurative movement toward some attraction; "the gravitation of the middle class to the suburbs"
6.drift - the pervading meaning or tenor; "caught the general drift of the conversation"
tenor, strain - the general meaning or substance of an utterance; "although I disagreed with him I could follow the tenor of his argument"
7.drift - a horizontal (or nearly horizontal) passageway in a mine; "they dug a drift parallel with the vein"
mining, excavation - the act of extracting ores or coal etc from the earth
passageway - a passage between rooms or between buildings
Verb1.drift - be in motion due to some air or water currentdrift - be in motion due to some air or water current; "The leaves were blowing in the wind"; "the boat drifted on the lake"; "The sailboat was adrift on the open sea"; "the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
float - move lightly, as if suspended; "The dancer floated across the stage"
waft - be driven or carried along, as by the air; "Sounds wafted into the room"
tide - be carried with the tide
drift - cause to be carried by a current; "drift the boats downstream"
stream - to extend, wave or float outward, as if in the wind; "their manes streamed like stiff black pennants in the wind"
2.drift - wander from a direct course or at random; "The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her"; "don't drift from the set course"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
rove, stray, roam, vagabond, wander, swan, ramble, range, drift, tramp, cast, roll - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
3.drift - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employmentdrift - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
maunder - wander aimlessly
gad, gallivant, jazz around - wander aimlessly in search of pleasure
drift, err, stray - wander from a direct course or at random; "The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her"; "don't drift from the set course"
wander - go via an indirect route or at no set pace; "After dinner, we wandered into town"
4.drift - vary or move from a fixed point or course; "stock prices are drifting higher"
drift - be subject to fluctuation; "The stock market drifted upward"
vary - be subject to change in accordance with a variable; "Prices vary"; "His moods vary depending on the weather"
5.drift - live unhurriedly, irresponsibly, or freely; "My son drifted around for years in California before going to law school"
drift - move in an unhurried fashion; "The unknown young man drifted among the invited guests"
subsist, exist, survive, live - support oneself; "he could barely exist on such a low wage"; "Can you live on $2000 a month in New York City?"; "Many people in the world have to subsist on $1 a day"
6.drift - move in an unhurried fashion; "The unknown young man drifted among the invited guests"
circulate - move around freely; "She circulates among royalty"
freewheel, drift - live unhurriedly, irresponsibly, or freely; "My son drifted around for years in California before going to law school"
7.drift - cause to be carried by a current; "drift the boats downstream"
float - set afloat; "He floated the logs down the river"; "The boy floated his toy boat on the pond"
be adrift, drift, float, blow - be in motion due to some air or water current; "The leaves were blowing in the wind"; "the boat drifted on the lake"; "The sailboat was adrift on the open sea"; "the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore"
8.drift - drive slowly and far afield for grazing; "drift the cattle herds westwards"
pasture, graze, crop - let feed in a field or pasture or meadow
9.drift - be subject to fluctuation; "The stock market drifted upward"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
drift - vary or move from a fixed point or course; "stock prices are drifting higher"
10.drift - be piled up in banks or heaps by the force of wind or a current; "snow drifting several feet high"; "sand drifting like snow"
amass, conglomerate, cumulate, pile up, accumulate, gather - collect or gather; "Journals are accumulating in my office"; "The work keeps piling up"

drift

verb
1. float, go (aimlessly), bob, coast, slip, sail, slide, glide, meander, waft, be carried along, move gently We proceeded to drift along the river.
2. wander, stroll, stray, roam, meander, rove, range, straggle, traipse (informal), stravaig (Scot. & Northern English dialect), peregrinate People drifted around the room.
3. stray, wander, roam, meander, digress, get sidetracked, go off at a tangent, get off the point I let my attention drift.
4. pile up, gather, accumulate, amass, bank up, heap up, form drifts The snow, except where it drifted, was only calf-deep.
noun
1. shift, movement, flow, transfer, relocation, gravitation the drift towards the cities
2. pile, bank, mass, heap, mound, accumulation A boy was trapped in a snow drift.
4. trend, course, current, flow, rush, sweep their fears at what they see as a drift towards economic chaos
drift off fall asleep, go off, drop off (informal), crash out (informal), nod off, conk out (informal) He finally drifted off.

drift

verb
1. To move along with or be carried away by the action of water:
2. To pass smoothly, quietly, and undisturbed on or as if on a slippery surface:
3. To move about at random, especially over a wide area:
4. To put into a disordered pile:
noun
1. A group of things gathered haphazardly:
2. Something suggestive of running water:
3. The general sense or significance, as of an action or statement:
4. The thread or current of thought uniting or occurring in all the elements of a text or discourse:
Translations
إتِّجاه، مَعْنىاِنْـجِرَافرُكام، إنْجِرافيَسيرُ على غَيْر هُدى، يَتَنَقَّلُيَنْجَرِفُ
být unášenpřecházetsmysltěkatunášení
driveflakkemeningsnedrive
ajelehtiaajopuukahluupaikkakasakasaantuma
להסחף
biti nošennanos
förgeteghófúvássodródik
hugsanagangur, merkingláta reka á reiîanum, slæpastreka; fjúkaskafl
押し流されるもの漂流する
떠돌다표류
bastūnasbastytisdrifterisišmesti į krantą medžiaiišmesti į krantą rąstgaliai
gaitaievirzekaudzekupenaļauties pašplūsmai
naviaťunášať
nositi
driftdriva
เร่ร่อนลอย
sự trôi dạttrôi dạt

drift

[drɪft]
A. N
1. (= deviation from course) → deriva f; (= movement) → movimiento m; (= change of direction) → cambio m (de dirección)
the drift to the cityel movimiento migratorio hacia la ciudad
the drift from the landel éxodo rural, la despoblación del campo
the drift of eventsla marcha de los acontecimientos
2. (= meaning) [of questions] → significado m
to catch sb's driftseguir or entender a algn
I don't get your driftno te entiendo
3. (= mass) [of snow] → ventisquero m; [of sand] → montón m; [of clouds, leaves] → banco m (Geol) → morrena f
continental driftderiva f continental
B. VI
1. (in wind, current) → dejarse llevar, ir a la deriva; (= be off course) [boat] → ir a la deriva; [person] → vagar, ir a la deriva
to drift downstreamdejarse llevar río abajo
he drifted into marriagese casó sin pensárselo
to let things driftdejar las cosas como están
to drift from job to jobcambiar a menudo de trabajo sin propósito fijo
2. [snow, sand] → amontonarse
C. VT (= carry) → impeler, llevar; (= pile up) → amontonar
D. CPD drift ice Nhielo m flotante
drift net Ntraína f
drift apart VI + ADVirse separando poco a poco
drift away VI + ADVdejarse llevar por la corriente
drift off VI + ADV (= doze off) → dormirse, quedarse dormido

drift

[ˈdrɪft]
n
[current] → force f
[sand] → amoncellement m
[snow] (on ground)congère f snow drift
(= movement of people) → mouvement m
(= general meaning) [speech] → sens m général
I catch your drift → Je vois en gros ce que vous voulez dire.
to get sb's drift, to follow sb's drift → comprendre où qn veut en venir
vi
(= move with the current) [boat] → aller à la dérive, dériver; [sailor] → être emporté(e) par le courant
to drift somewhere → dériver quelque part
to let things drift (fig) (= fail to control) → laisser les choses aller à la dérive
(= move with the wind) [mist] → être poussé(e) par le vent; [balloon] → être poussé(e) par le vent
(= pile up) [sand, snow] → s'amonceler, s'entasser
drift apart
vi (= become estranged) [friends, lovers] → s'éloigner l'un de l'autre
drift away
vi (= disperse) [crowd, people] → se disperser
drift into
vt fus (= become involved in without planning) [+ crime, prostitution] → sombrer peu à peu dans
drift off
vi (= fall asleep) → s'assoupir
to drift off to sleep → se laisser gagner par le sommeil

drift

vi
(Naut, Aviat, snow) → treiben; (sand)wehen; (Rad) → verschwimmen; to drift off courseabtreiben; rally drivers have a technique of drifting round cornersRallyefahrer haben eine Technik, sich durch Kurven tragen zu lassen
(fig, person) → sich treiben lassen; to let things driftdie Dinge treiben lassen; he drifted into marriage/crimeer schlitterte in die Ehe/in eine kriminelle Laufbahn hinein (inf); he drifted from job to jober ließ sich planlos von Job zu Job treiben; he was drifting aimlessly along (in life etc) → er lebte planlos in den Tag hinein, er ließ sich plan- und ziellos treiben; the nation was drifting toward(s) a crisisdas Land trieb auf eine Krise zu; young people are drifting away from the villagesjunge Leute wandern aus den Dörfern ab; to drift apart (people)sich auseinanderleben; we’re drifting apartwir leben uns immer mehr auseinander; the audience started drifting awaydas Publikum begann wegzugehen
vttreiben; (wind) snow alsovor sich her treiben
n
(of air, water current)Strömung f; the drift of the current (speed) → die (Stärke der) Strömung; (direction) → die Strömung(srichtung)
(= mass caused by drifting, of sand, fallen snow) → Verwehung f; (of leaves)Haufen m
(of ship, aircraft)(Ab)drift f, → Abweichung f; to allow for driftAbdriften or Abweichungen (mit) einkalkulieren
(Geol: = deposits) → Geschiebe nt; glacial driftMoräne f
(= tendency) the drift towards the citiesder Drang in die Städte; the drift of policy away from this reformdas grundsätzliche Abrücken von dieser Reform; the drift of support away from himdie nachlassende Unterstützung für ihn
(= general meaning: of questions) → Richtung f, → Tendenz f; I caught the drift of what he saidich verstand, worauf er hinauswollte; if you get my driftwenn Sie mich richtig verstehen
(Ling) → Tendenz f

drift

:
drift net
nTreibnetz nt
drift sand
nTreibsand m
driftwood
nTreibholz nt

drift

[drɪft]
1. n
a. (direction, of current) → direzione f; (of events) → corso; (of conversation, opinion) → tendenza
b. (meaning, of questions) → senso
to catch sb's drift → capire dove qn vuole arrivare
c. (loss of direction) → deriva
d. (mass of snow, sand) → cumulo, mucchio
2. vi (in wind, current) → andare alla deriva; (clouds) → essere sospinto/a dal vento; (boat) → essere trasportato/a dalla corrente; (sand, snow) → accumularsi, ammucchiarsi; (person) → vagare; (events) to drift (towards)scivolare (verso)
to drift downstream → venir portato/a a valle dalla corrente
he drifted into marriage → ha finito con lo sposarsi
to let things drift → lasciare che le cose vadano come vogliono
to drift apart (friends) → perdersi di vista (lovers) → allontanarsi l'uno dall'altro
drift off vi + adv (fall asleep) → scivolare nel sonno

drift

(drift) noun
1. a heap of something driven together, especially snow. His car stuck in a snowdrift.
2. the direction in which something is going; the general meaning. I couldn't hear you clearly, but I did catch the drift of what you said.
verb
1. to (cause to) float or be blown along. Sand drifted across the road; The boat drifted down the river.
2. (of people) to wander or live aimlessly. She drifted from job to job.
ˈdrifter noun
1. a fishing-boat that uses a net which floats near the surface of the water.
2. a person who drifts.
ˈdriftwood noun
wood floating on or cast up on the shore by the sea. We made a fire with driftwood.

drift

اِنْـجِرَاف, يَنْجَرِفُ být unášen, unášení drive treiben, Verwehung μετατόπιση, περιφέρομαι flujo, ir a la deriva, marcha ajelehtia, kinos dérive, dériver biti nošen, nanos moto, trascinare 押し流されるもの, 漂流する 떠돌다, 표류 afdrijven, verplaatsing drive dryf, zanieść z prądem coisa flutuante, deriva, ser levado pela corrente, ser levado pela correnteza дрейфовать, перемещение drift, driva เร่ร่อน, ลอย sürüklenmek, uzaklaşma sự trôi dạt, trôi dạt 漂流
References in classic literature ?
Laurie made no effort of any kind, but just let himself drift along as comfortably as possible, trying to forget, and feeling that all women owed him a kind word because one had been cold to him.
I used to love to drift along the pale-yellow cornfields, looking for the damp spots one sometimes found at their edges, where the smartweed soon turned a rich copper colour and the narrow brown leaves hung curled like cocoons about the swollen joints of the stem.
Sailing across the bay to the Cheniere Caminada, Edna felt as if she were being borne away from some anchorage which had held her fast, whose chains had been loosening--had snapped the night before when the mystic spirit was abroad, leaving her free to drift whithersoever she chose to set her sails.
A tide of waifs, strays, and malcontents of old camps along the river began to set towards Devil's Ford, in very much the same fashion as the debris, drift, and alluvium had been carried down in bygone days and cast upon its banks.
He says, Monsieur, that his principles won't admit of his drinking; but that if Monsieur wants to live another day to drink, then Monsieur had best drop all four boats, and pull the ship away from these whales, for it's so calm they won't drift.
One stood and watched, and little by little caught the drift of the tide, as it set in the direction of the packing houses.
Clare, "a time in my life when I had plans and hopes of doing something in this world, more than to float and drift.
As he talked along, softly, pleasantly, flowingly, he seemed to drift away imperceptibly out of this world and time, and into some remote era and old forgotten country; and so he gradually wove such a spell about me that I seemed to move among the specters and shadows and dust and mold of a gray antiquity, holding speech with a relic of it
Some of those other people will have to drift around to two or three hotels, in the rain, before they find accommodations.
The moon was so bright I could a counted the drift logs that went a-slipping along, black and still, hundreds of yards out from shore.
Tom presently began to drift insensibly back into the con- cerns of this life again.
Dashwood began shortly to give over every hope of the kind, and to be convinced, from the general drift of his discourse, that his assistance extended no farther than their maintenance for six months at Norland.