drop in


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drop in

vb (intr, adverb)
(Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) surfing to intrude on a wave that another surfer is already riding
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.drop in - visit informally and spontaneously; "We frequently drop by the neighbors' house for a cup of coffee"
call in, visit, call - pay a brief visit; "The mayor likes to call on some of the prominent citizens"

drop

noun
1. A quantity of liquid falling or resting in a spherical mass:
2. A small amount of liquor:
Informal: nip, slug.
Slang: snort.
4. The act of dropping from a height:
5. A usually swift downward trend, as in prices:
6. The extent or measurement downward from a surface:
7. A downward slope or distance:
8. A dominating position, as in a conflict:
Informal: inside track, jump.
verb
1. To go from a more erect posture to a less erect posture:
2. To undergo a sharp, rapid descent in value or price:
Idiom: take a sudden downtrend.
3. To slope downward:
4. To cause to fall, as from a shot or blow:
Slang: deck.
Idiom: lay low.
5. To cease consideration or treatment of:
6. To take or leave out:
7. To suffer the loss of:
Idiom: kiss good-by to.
8. To suddenly lose all health or strength:
Informal: crack up.
Slang: conk out.
Idiom: give way.
9. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
10. To end the employment or service of:
Informal: ax, fire, pink-slip.
Slang: boot, bounce, can, sack.
Idioms: give someone his or her walking papers, give someone the ax, give someone the gate, give someone the pink slip, let go, show someone the door.
11. To fall or let fall in drops of liquid:
12. To move downward in response to gravity:
13. To come to the ground suddenly and involuntarily:
Idiom: take a fall.
14. To cause to descend:
phrasal verb
drop by
To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
drop in
To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
drop off
To decline, as in value or quantity, very gradually:
Translations
يَزور بصورةٍ غَيْر مُتَوَقَّعَه
přijít se podívatzajít
dumpe indenfor
koma í heimsókn
prísť
uğramak

drop

(drop) noun
1. a small round or pear-shaped blob of liquid, usually falling. a drop of rain.
2. a small quantity (of liquid). If you want more wine, there's a drop left.
3. an act of falling. a drop in temperature.
4. a vertical descent. From the top of the mountain there was a sheer drop of a thousand feet.
verbpast tense, past participle dropped
1. to let fall, usually accidentally. She dropped a box of pins all over the floor.
2. to fall. The coin dropped through the grating; The cat dropped on to its paws.
3. to give up (a friend, a habit etc). I think she's dropped the idea of going to London.
4. to set down from a car etc. The bus dropped me at the end of the road.
5. to say or write in an informal and casual manner. I'll drop her a note.
ˈdroplet (-lit) noun
a tiny drop. droplets of rain.
ˈdroppings noun plural
excrement (of animals or birds).
ˈdrop-out noun
a person who withdraws, especially from a course at a university etc or the normal life of society.
drop a brick / drop a clanger
unknowingly to say or do something extremely tactless.
drop back
to slow down; to fall behind. I was at the front of the crowd but I dropped back to speak to Bill.
drop by
to visit someone casually and without being invited. I'll drop by at his house on my way home.
drop in
to arrive informally to visit someone. Do drop in (on me) if you happen to be passing!
drop off
1. to become separated or fall off. The door-handle dropped off; This button dropped off your coat.
2. to fall asleep. I was so tired I dropped off in front of the television.
3. to allow to get off a vehicle. Drop me off at the corner.
drop out (often with of)
to withdraw from a group, from a course at university, or from the normal life of society. There are only two of us going to the theatre now Mary has dropped out; She's dropped out of college.
References in classic literature ?
I have heard my grandmother (Lady Malkinshaw) say that, 'a drop in time saves nine.
A drop in time saves nine'--my sentiments, if I may put myself on a par with her ladyship.
I have some cards to leave at the other end of Bellevue Avenue, and I'll drop in at about half-past three and stay long enough to make poor Amy feel that she hasn't been slighted.