drop off


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drop

 (drŏp)
n.
1.
a. A small amount of a liquid, drawn into a roughly spherical mass by surface tension.
b. The quantity of liquid contained in such a mass, especially when measured out by a dropper.
c. drops Liquid medicine administered in drops.
d. A small quantity of a liquid: There isn't a drop of milk left.
e. Informal An alcoholic drink: a man known to have a drop now and then.
2. A trace or hint: not a drop of pity.
3.
a. Something, such as an earring, shaped or hanging like a drop.
b. A small globular piece of hard candy.
4. The act of falling; descent: the drop of the curtain; the sun's drop toward the horizon.
5. A swift decline or decrease, as in quality, quantity, or intensity: a drop in sales.
6.
a. The vertical distance from a higher to a lower level: The cliff has a drop of 50 feet.
b. The distance through which something falls or drops.
7. A sheer incline, such as the face of a cliff: Stay clear of the drop.
8.
a. A descent or delivery of something by parachute: made a drop of supplies to the explorers.
b. Personnel and equipment landed by means of parachute.
9. Something, such as a trapdoor on a gallows, that is arranged to fall or be lowered.
10. A drop curtain.
11. A slot through which something is deposited in a receptacle.
12. A central place or establishment where something, such as mail, is brought and subsequently distributed.
13.
a. A predetermined location for the deposit and subsequent removal of secret communications or illicit goods, such as drugs.
b. The act of depositing such communications or materials.
14. Electronics A connection made available for an input or output unit on a transmission line.
v. dropped, drop·ping, drops
v.intr.
1. To fall in drops: rain dropping from an umbrella.
2. To fall from a higher to a lower place or position: The plate dropped onto the floor.
3. To become less, as in number, intensity, or volume: The temperature dropped below 0.
4. To move or descend from one height or level to another: He dropped into a crouch. The sun dropped below the horizon.
5. To fall or sink into a state of exhaustion or death.
6. To pass or slip into a specified state or condition: dropped into a doze; drop out of sight.
7. Sports To fall or roll into a basket or hole. Used of a ball.
v.tr.
1. To let fall by releasing hold of: I dropped the towel onto the floor.
2. To let fall in drops: drop the medicine into the ear.
3. To cause to become less; reduce: drop the rate of production.
4. To cause to fall, as by hitting or shooting: dropped him with a left hook.
5. Sports To hurl or strike (a ball) into a basket or hole.
6. To give birth to. Used of animals.
7. To say or offer casually: drop a hint; drop a name.
8. To write at one's leisure: drop me a note.
9. To cease consideration or treatment of: dropped the matter altogether.
10. To terminate an association or a relationship with: an actor who was dropped by the talent agency.
11. To leave unfinished: drop everything and help.
12. To leave out (a letter, for example) in speaking or writing.
13. To leave or set down at a particular place; unload: I dropped the book in your office.
14. Informal To spend, especially lavishly or rashly: "dropping $50,000 in an Atlantic City casino" (George F. Will).
15. To airdrop (supplies, for example).
16. To lower the level of (the voice).
17. To lose (a game or contest, for example).
18. Slang To take, as a drug, by mouth: drop acid.
Phrasal Verbs:
drop back
Football To back away from the line of scrimmage.
drop behind
To fall behind: dropped behind the rest of the class during her illness.
drop by
To stop in for a short visit.
drop off
1. To fall asleep.
2. To decrease: Sales dropped off in the fourth quarter.
drop out
1. To withdraw from participation, as in a game, club, or school.
2. To withdraw from established society, especially because of disillusion with conventional values.
drop over
To stop in for a short visit.
Idioms:
at the drop of a hat
1. Immediately; without delay: would sign the contract at the drop of a hat.
2. With only the slightest provocation: ready to argue at the drop of a hat.
drop a dime Slang
To make a telephone call, especially to the police to inform on or betray someone.
drop in the bucket
A small, inadequate quantity.
drop the ball
To make a mistake or fail to do something important.
get/have the drop on
To achieve a distinct advantage over.

[Middle English droppe, from Old English dropa; see dhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

drop off

vb (adverb)
1. (intr) to grow smaller or less; decline
2. (tr) to allow to alight; set down
3. (intr) informal to fall asleep
n
4. (Physical Geography) a steep or vertical descent
5. a sharp decrease
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.drop off - fall or diminish; "The number of students in this course dropped off after the first test"
decrease, diminish, lessen, fall - decrease in size, extent, or range; "The amount of homework decreased towards the end of the semester"; "The cabin pressure fell dramatically"; "her weight fell to under a hundred pounds"; "his voice fell to a whisper"
2.drop off - change from a waking to a sleeping statedrop off - change from a waking to a sleeping state; "he always falls asleep during lectures"
zonk out - fall asleep fast, as when one is extremely tired; "after the long drive, we zonked out and slept for 10 hours"
3.drop off - leave or unload; "unload the cargo"; "drop off the passengers at the hotel"
deliver - bring to a destination, make a delivery; "our local super market delivers"
wharf - discharge at a wharf; "wharf the passengers"
air-drop - drop (an object) from the air; unload from a plane or helicopter
4.drop off - retreat
retrogress, regress, retrograde - get worse or fall back to a previous condition
5.drop off - get worse; "My grades are slipping"
decline, worsen - grow worse; "Conditions in the slum worsened"
backslide, lapse - drop to a lower level, as in one's morals or standards

drop

noun
1. A quantity of liquid falling or resting in a spherical mass:
2. A small amount of liquor:
Informal: nip, slug.
Slang: snort.
4. The act of dropping from a height:
5. A usually swift downward trend, as in prices:
6. The extent or measurement downward from a surface:
7. A downward slope or distance:
8. A dominating position, as in a conflict:
Informal: inside track, jump.
verb
1. To go from a more erect posture to a less erect posture:
2. To undergo a sharp, rapid descent in value or price:
Idiom: take a sudden downtrend.
3. To slope downward:
4. To cause to fall, as from a shot or blow:
Slang: deck.
Idiom: lay low.
5. To cease consideration or treatment of:
6. To take or leave out:
7. To suffer the loss of:
Idiom: kiss good-by to.
8. To suddenly lose all health or strength:
Informal: crack up.
Slang: conk out.
Idiom: give way.
9. To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
10. To end the employment or service of:
Informal: ax, fire, pink-slip.
Slang: boot, bounce, can, sack.
Idioms: give someone his or her walking papers, give someone the ax, give someone the gate, give someone the pink slip, let go, show someone the door.
11. To fall or let fall in drops of liquid:
12. To move downward in response to gravity:
13. To come to the ground suddenly and involuntarily:
Idiom: take a fall.
14. To cause to descend:
phrasal verb
drop by
To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
drop in
To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
drop off
To decline, as in value or quantity, very gradually:
Translations
يَسْقُطُ نائِمايَسْقُط، يَنْفَكُّيُنْزِل
upadnoutusnoutuvolnit sevysadit
falde affalde i søvn
detta afhleypa úr/útsofna

drop

(drop) noun
1. a small round or pear-shaped blob of liquid, usually falling. a drop of rain.
2. a small quantity (of liquid). If you want more wine, there's a drop left.
3. an act of falling. a drop in temperature.
4. a vertical descent. From the top of the mountain there was a sheer drop of a thousand feet.
verbpast tense, past participle dropped
1. to let fall, usually accidentally. She dropped a box of pins all over the floor.
2. to fall. The coin dropped through the grating; The cat dropped on to its paws.
3. to give up (a friend, a habit etc). I think she's dropped the idea of going to London.
4. to set down from a car etc. The bus dropped me at the end of the road.
5. to say or write in an informal and casual manner. I'll drop her a note.
ˈdroplet (-lit) noun
a tiny drop. droplets of rain.
ˈdroppings noun plural
excrement (of animals or birds).
ˈdrop-out noun
a person who withdraws, especially from a course at a university etc or the normal life of society.
drop a brick / drop a clanger
unknowingly to say or do something extremely tactless.
drop back
to slow down; to fall behind. I was at the front of the crowd but I dropped back to speak to Bill.
drop by
to visit someone casually and without being invited. I'll drop by at his house on my way home.
drop in
to arrive informally to visit someone. Do drop in (on me) if you happen to be passing!
drop off
1. to become separated or fall off. The door-handle dropped off; This button dropped off your coat.
2. to fall asleep. I was so tired I dropped off in front of the television.
3. to allow to get off a vehicle. Drop me off at the corner.
drop out (often with of)
to withdraw from a group, from a course at university, or from the normal life of society. There are only two of us going to the theatre now Mary has dropped out; She's dropped out of college.
References in classic literature ?
And the same instant his head did begin to feel drowsy and he began to drop off into forgetfulness.
Sancho, lying across his ass, followed him, as has been said, and at length came up, having by this time recovered his senses, and on joining him let himself drop off Dapple at Rocinante's feet, sore, bruised, and belaboured.
Then there's another kind of bug that burrows under your fingernails, and if you don't get 'em out, your fingers drop off.
He'll drop off after a while--if he's not too upset.
To review his life was like descending a green tree in fruit and flower, and seeing all the branches wither and drop off, one by one, as he came down towards them.
The natives who had swarmed about the place began immediately to drop off, until at length not an Indian was to be seen.
At last, with a grand design burning within his brave heart, he begged them to do it once more with him clinging to the tail, and now a hundred flew off with the string, and Peter clung to the tail, meaning to drop off when he was over the Gardens.
A State which bore this kind of fruit, and suffered it to drop off as fast as it ripened, would prepare the way for a still more perfect and glorious State, which also I have imagined, but not yet anywhere seen.
But another agency is perhaps more effectual: I suspended a duck's feet, which might represent those of a bird sleeping in a natural pond, in an aquarium, where many ova of fresh-water shells were hatching; and I found that numbers of the extremely minute and just hatched shells crawled on the feet, and clung to them so firmly that when taken out of the water they could not be jarred off, though at a somewhat more advanced age they would voluntarily drop off.
He went below with a monkey-wrench, unscrewed the nut, and let the hook drop off.
The rain has stopped; and the persons on the outside of the crowd begin to drop off.