dropout


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drop·out

 (drŏp′out′)
n.
1.
a. One who quits school.
b. One who has withdrawn from a given social group or environment.
2.
a. A segment of a recording device, such as a magnetic tape or optical disk, that is damaged or unreadable.
b. The loss of an audio or video signal.

dropout

(ˈdrɒpˌaʊt)
n
1. (Education) a student who fails to complete a school or college course
2. (Sociology) a person who rejects conventional society
3. (Rugby) rugby : drop-out a drop kick taken by the defending team to restart play, as after a touchdown
4. (Electronics) electronics : drop-out a momentary loss of signal in a magnetic recording medium as a result of an imperfection in its magnetic coating
vb
to abandon or withdraw from (a school, social group, job, etc)

drop′out`

or drop′-out`,



n.
1. a student who withdraws before completing a course of instruction.
2. one who withdraws from established society.
3. a person who withdraws from a competition, job, task, etc.
[1925–30]

dropout

A person who leaves a school or college without having completed the course of study.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dropout - someone who quits school before graduation
quitter - a person who gives up too easily
2.dropout - someone who withdraws from a social group or environment
individualist - a person who pursues independent thought or action
Translations

dropout

[ˈdrɒpaʊt] N
1. (from society) → marginado/a m/f; (from university) estudiante que abandona la universidad antes de graduarse
2. (Rugby) → puntapié m de saque

dropout

n (from society) → Aussteiger(in) m(f) (inf); (pej)Asoziale(r) mf; (= university dropout)Studienabbrecher(in) m(f); the dropout rate at universitiesdie Zahl der Studienabbrecher

dropout

[ˈdrɒpaʊt] n
a. (from school, university) → chi ha abbandonato gli studi; (from society) → chi si mette ai margini della società
the school/college dropout rate → la percentuale di abbandono della scuola/università
b. (Rugby) → calcio di rinvio
References in periodicals archive ?
Among all individuals in this age group, status dropout rates trended downward between 1972 and today, declining from 14.
ERIC Descriptors: Credentials; Dropouts; Developmental Studies Programs; Community Colleges; Dropout Prevention; School Holding Power; Student Characteristics; Age Differences; Academic Persistence; College Preparation; College Readiness; Part Time Students; Student Financial Aid
The California Dropout Research Project, located at the University of California at Santa Barbara, has estimated the lifetime cost of one class or cohort of dropouts for the state of California at 824,212,395,755.
Now, because of the way the state calculates high school completion and dropout rates, schools like Austin Can
State education statistics don't always carry good news for Fitchburg, but yesterday the city was a highlight of a state report that shows falling dropout rates around Massachusetts.
Redrawing the dire high school graduation picture painted just a few months ago, Los Angeles Unified officials announced this week that the district's dropout rate fell sharply in 2007-08 to about 26 percent.
A new statewide effort in Mississippi to reduce the high school dropout rate is experiencing positive results in the northeast part of the state.
This strong message reverberated in education circles last October the NEA unveiled a comprehensive plan for communities to address the dropout crisis because, after all, it takes a village to raise a child.
Atlantic Canada showed the most dramatic improvement, with Newfoundland reducing its dropout rate during this period from 20% to 8%.
Canada's high school dropout rate has declined significantly since the early 1990s, especially in the Atlantic provinces, according to a report by Statistics Canada.
Dropout rates have steeply declined during the last 30 years, however, and high school dropouts now constitute only 8 percent of the U.
At the other end of the scale, dropout rates have actually increased since 1990, rising to 30 percent of all 17-year-olds.