drove


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Related to drove: drive

drove 1

 (drōv)
v.
Past tense of drive.

drove 2

 (drōv)
n.
1.
a. A flock or herd being driven in a body.
b. often droves A large mass of people moving or acting as a body: people moving through the streets in droves.
2.
a. A stonemason's broad-edged chisel used for rough hewing.
b. A stone surface dressed with such a chisel.

[Middle English, from Old English drāf, from drīfan, to drive; see dhreibh- in Indo-European roots.]

drove

(drəʊv)
vb
the past tense of drive

drove

(drəʊv)
n
1. (Agriculture) a herd of livestock being driven together
2. (often plural) a moving crowd of people
3. (Civil Engineering) a narrow irrigation channel
4. (Tools) Also called: drove chisel a chisel with a broad edge used for dressing stone
vb
5. (Agriculture)
a. (tr) to drive (a group of livestock), usually for a considerable distance
b. (intr) to be employed as a drover
6. (Tools) to work (a stone surface) with a drove
[Old English drāf herd; related to Middle Low German drēfwech cattle pasture; see drive, drift]

drove1

(droʊv)

v.
pt. of drive.

drove2

(droʊv)

n., v. droved, drov•ing. n.
1. a number of oxen, sheep, or swine driven in a group; herd; flock.
2. Usu., droves. a large crowd of human beings, esp. in motion.
3. Also called drove′ chis`el. a chisel, from 2 to 4 in. (5 to 10 cm) broad at the edge, for dressing stones to an approximately true surface.
v.t.
4. to dress (stone) with a drove.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English drāf that which is driven]

Drove

 a crowd of people moving in one direction; a number of cattle or other animals driven in a body. See also concourse, drift, flock.
Examples: drove of asses; of beasts, 1350; of bullocks; of cab-drivers—Lipton, 1970; of cattle, 1555; of heresies, 1692; of horses, 1764; of immoralities, 1692; of kine [‘cattle’]; of oxen; of young shoat [‘pigs’], 1707; of sheep, 1837; of swine.

drove


Past participle: droved
Gerund: droving

Imperative
drove
drove
Present
I drove
you drove
he/she/it droves
we drove
you drove
they drove
Preterite
I droved
you droved
he/she/it droved
we droved
you droved
they droved
Present Continuous
I am droving
you are droving
he/she/it is droving
we are droving
you are droving
they are droving
Present Perfect
I have droved
you have droved
he/she/it has droved
we have droved
you have droved
they have droved
Past Continuous
I was droving
you were droving
he/she/it was droving
we were droving
you were droving
they were droving
Past Perfect
I had droved
you had droved
he/she/it had droved
we had droved
you had droved
they had droved
Future
I will drove
you will drove
he/she/it will drove
we will drove
you will drove
they will drove
Future Perfect
I will have droved
you will have droved
he/she/it will have droved
we will have droved
you will have droved
they will have droved
Future Continuous
I will be droving
you will be droving
he/she/it will be droving
we will be droving
you will be droving
they will be droving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been droving
you have been droving
he/she/it has been droving
we have been droving
you have been droving
they have been droving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been droving
you will have been droving
he/she/it will have been droving
we will have been droving
you will have been droving
they will have been droving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been droving
you had been droving
he/she/it had been droving
we had been droving
you had been droving
they had been droving
Conditional
I would drove
you would drove
he/she/it would drove
we would drove
you would drove
they would drove
Past Conditional
I would have droved
you would have droved
he/she/it would have droved
we would have droved
you would have droved
they would have droved
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drove - a group of animals (a herd or flock) moving together
animal group - a group of animals
2.drove - a moving crowddrove - a moving crowd      
crowd - a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers"
3.drove - a stonemason's chisel with a broad edge for dressing stonedrove - a stonemason's chisel with a broad edge for dressing stone
chisel - an edge tool with a flat steel blade with a cutting edge

drove

noun (often plural) herd, company, crowds, collection, gathering, mob, flocks, swarm, horde, multitude, throng Scientists are leaving the country in droves.

drove

noun
1. An enormous number of persons gathered together:
2. A very large number of things grouped together:
Translations

drove

[drəʊv]
A. PT of drive
B. N [of cattle] → manada f
droves of peopleuna multitud de gente
they came in drovesacudieron en tropel

drove

1
n (of animals)Herde f; (of people)Schar f; they came in drovessie kamen in hellen Scharen

drove

[drəʊv]
1. pt of drive
2. n (of cattle) → mandria
droves of people → centinaia fpl di persone
they came in droves → sono arrivati a frotte

drove

pret de drive
References in classic literature ?
Her stealthy paws tread the very hall Where Snowball used to play, But she only spits at the dogs our pet So gallantly drove away.
Long before the time during which we will know him, he was a doctor and drove a jaded white horse from house to house through the streets of Winesburg.
There was a panic among some of the passengers, and a few excited men behaved in a way that caused prompt action on the part of the first officer, who drove them back to the main cabin under threat of a revolver.
The Bohemian family, grandmother told me as we drove along, had bought the homestead of a fellow countryman, Peter Krajiek, and had paid him more than it was worth.
Now you know," he said, "now you know what I have been fighting against since last summer at Grand Isle; what drove me away and drove me back again.
Sometimes we saw hundreds in a drove, and the numbers about the salt springs were amazing.
Oh, you'll get over that," responded Mattingly, with an exasperating confidence that drove her nearly frantic, from the manifest kindliness of intent that made it impossible for her to resent it.
The butcher's cart, with its snowy canopy, was an acceptable object; so was the fish-cart, heralded by its horn; so, likewise, was the countryman's cart of vegetables, plodding from door to door, with long pauses of the patient horse, while his owner drove a trade in turnips, carrots, summer-squashes, string-beans, green peas, and new potatoes, with half the housewives of the neighborhood.
For some weeks he drove us together, and then we were sold to a fashionable gentleman, and were sent up to London.
When he shut the door, mounted the box with the coachman, and they drove off, the little girlfound herself seated in a comfortably cushioned corner, but she was not inclined to go to sleep again.
As he drove, therefore, he counted his wrongs, and thirsted for sympathy and drink.