drover


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drov·er

 (drō′vər)
n.
One who drives cattle or sheep.

drover

(ˈdrəʊvə)
n
(Agriculture) a person whose occupation is the driving of sheep or cattle, esp to and from market

dro•ver

(ˈdroʊ vər)

n.
a person who drives cattle or sheep.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drover - someone who drives a herddrover - someone who drives a herd    
goat herder, goatherd - a person who tends a flock of goats
hired hand, hired man, hand - a hired laborer on a farm or ranch; "the hired hand fixed the railing"; "a ranch hand"
sheepherder, sheepman, shepherd - a herder of sheep (on an open range); someone who keeps the sheep together in a flock
pigman, swineherd - a herder or swine
Translations

drover

[ˈdrəʊvəʳ] Nboyero m, pastor m

drover

nViehtreiber(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
And the honest drover, in his warmth, endorsed this moral sentiment by firing a perfect feu de joi at the fireplace.
Recalled by the rumbling of wheels to the road before me, I saw a heavily-laden waggon labouring up the hill, and not far beyond were two cows and their drover.
Mine host of the "Seven Does" stood by, discussing the eternal Robin with a drover.
The drover, the sailor, buffets it all day, and his health renews itself at as vigorous a pulse under the sleet as under the sun of June.
And he took her, and Mrs Lammle went next, and Mr Lammle went last, savagely following his little flock, like a drover.
He said they were only fit for drovers or gypsies, and not for young gentlemen.
They were drovers and stock raisers, who had come from far states, and brokers and commission merchants, and buyers for all the big packing houses.
It was almost a sufficient motive, not only to make me take off what would be called by pig- drovers the mange, but the skin itself.
The shepherds and drovers accompanying the flock shouted to him to desist; seeing it was no use, they ungirt their slings and began to salute his ears with stones as big as one's fist.
here comes the cattle-train bearing the cattle of a thousand hills, sheepcots, stables, and cow-yards in the air, drovers with their sticks, and shepherd boys in the midst of their flocks, all but the mountain pastures, whirled along like leaves blown from the mountains by the September gales.
The guard had just finished an account of a desperate fight which had happened at one of the fairs between the drovers and the farmers with their whips, and the boys with cricket-bats and wickets, which arose out of a playful but objectionable practice of the boys going round to the public-houses and taking the linch-pins out of the wheels of the gigs, and was moralizing upon the way in which the Doctor, "a terrible stern man he'd heard tell," had come down upon several of the performers, "sending three on 'em off next morning in a po-shay with a parish constable," when they turned a corner and neared the milestone, the third from Rugby.
Countrymen, butchers, drovers, hawkers, boys, thieves, idlers, and vagabonds of every low grade, were mingled together in a mass; the whistling of drovers, the barking dogs, the bellowing and plunging of the oxen, the bleating of sheep, the grunting and squeaking of pigs, the cries of hawkers, the shouts, oaths, and quarrelling on all sides; the ringing of bells and roar of voices, that issued from every public-house; the crowding, pushing, driving, beating, whooping and yelling; the hideous and discordant dim that resounded from every corner of the market; and the unwashed, unshaven, squalid, and dirty figues constantly running to and fro, and bursting in and out of the throng; rendered it a stunning and bewildering scene, which quite confounded the senses.