drowse

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Also found in: Thesaurus.

drowse

 (drouz)
v. drowsed, drows·ing, drows·es
v.intr.
To be half-asleep: drowsed in the warm sun.
v.tr.
1. To make drowsy: "drowsed with the fume of poppies" (John Keats).
2. To pass (time) by drowsing.
n.
The condition of being sleepy.

[Perhaps ultimately from Old English drūsian, to sink, be sluggish; see dhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

drowse

(draʊz)
vb
to be or cause to be sleepy, dull, or sluggish
n
the state of being drowsy
[C16: probably from Old English drūsian to sink; related to drēosan to fall]

drowse

(draʊz)

v. drowsed, drows•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to be sleepy or half-asleep.
2. to be dull or sluggish.
v.t.
3. to pass or spend (time) in drowsing (often fol. by away): He drowsed away the morning.
4. to make sleepy or sluggish.
n.
5. a sleepy or sluggish condition; state of being half-asleep.
[before 900; Old English drūsian to droop]

drowse


Past participle: drowsed
Gerund: drowsing

Imperative
drowse
drowse
Present
I drowse
you drowse
he/she/it drowses
we drowse
you drowse
they drowse
Preterite
I drowsed
you drowsed
he/she/it drowsed
we drowsed
you drowsed
they drowsed
Present Continuous
I am drowsing
you are drowsing
he/she/it is drowsing
we are drowsing
you are drowsing
they are drowsing
Present Perfect
I have drowsed
you have drowsed
he/she/it has drowsed
we have drowsed
you have drowsed
they have drowsed
Past Continuous
I was drowsing
you were drowsing
he/she/it was drowsing
we were drowsing
you were drowsing
they were drowsing
Past Perfect
I had drowsed
you had drowsed
he/she/it had drowsed
we had drowsed
you had drowsed
they had drowsed
Future
I will drowse
you will drowse
he/she/it will drowse
we will drowse
you will drowse
they will drowse
Future Perfect
I will have drowsed
you will have drowsed
he/she/it will have drowsed
we will have drowsed
you will have drowsed
they will have drowsed
Future Continuous
I will be drowsing
you will be drowsing
he/she/it will be drowsing
we will be drowsing
you will be drowsing
they will be drowsing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been drowsing
you have been drowsing
he/she/it has been drowsing
we have been drowsing
you have been drowsing
they have been drowsing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been drowsing
you will have been drowsing
he/she/it will have been drowsing
we will have been drowsing
you will have been drowsing
they will have been drowsing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been drowsing
you had been drowsing
he/she/it had been drowsing
we had been drowsing
you had been drowsing
they had been drowsing
Conditional
I would drowse
you would drowse
he/she/it would drowse
we would drowse
you would drowse
they would drowse
Past Conditional
I would have drowsed
you would have drowsed
he/she/it would have drowsed
we would have drowsed
you would have drowsed
they would have drowsed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drowse - a light fitful sleepdrowse - a light fitful sleep      
sleeping - the suspension of consciousness and decrease in metabolic rate
Verb1.drowse - sleep lightly or for a short period of time
catch a wink, catnap, nap - take a siesta; "She naps everyday after lunch for an hour"
2.drowse - be on the verge of sleeping; "The students were drowsing in the 8 AM class"
rest - be at rest
nod - be almost asleep; "The old man sat nodding by the fireplace"
dope off, doze off, drift off, drowse off, fall asleep, flake out, nod off, drop off - change from a waking to a sleeping state; "he always falls asleep during lectures"

drowse

verb
1. sleep, drop off (informal), doze, nap, slumber, kip (Brit. slang), snooze (informal), nod off, get some shut-eye, zizz (Brit. informal), have or get forty winks, catch some zeds (informal) She drowsed for a while.
Translations

drowse

[draʊz] VIdormitar
to drowse offadormilarse

drowse

[ˈdraʊz] visomnoler

drowse

vi (→ vor sich (acc) → hin) dösen or dämmern
nHalbschlaf m, → Dämmerschlaf m

drowse

[draʊz] visonnecchiare, essere mezzo assopito/a

drowse

v. adormecerse, adormitarse.
References in classic literature ?
After I had fallen over eight or nine precipices and thus found out that one half of my brain had been asleep eight or nine times without the wide-awake, hard-working other half suspecting it, the periodical unconsciousnesses began to extend their spell gradually over more of my brain-territory, and at last I sank into a drowse which grew deeper and deeper and was doubtless just on the very point of being a solid, blessed dreamless stupor, when--what was that?
The mouse eventually retired, and by and by I was sinking to sleep, when a clock began to strike; I counted till it was done, and was about to drowse again when another clock began; I counted; then the two great RATHHAUS clock angels began to send forth soft, rich, melodious blasts from their long trumpets.
I think I drowse myself, for all of sudden I feel guilt, as though I have done something.
Through growing drowse he heard the names of devils - of Zulbazan, Son of Eblis, who lives in bazars and paraos, making all the sudden lewd wickedness of wayside halts; of Dulhan, invisible about mosques, the dweller among the slippers of the faithful, who hinders folk from their prayers; and Musboot, Lord of lies and panic.
Her very soul, her grave, indignant, and fantastic soul, seemed to drowse like an exhausted traveller surrendering himself to the sleep of death.
He would not let her get up to dinner, but fed her himself, and then forgot his own while he sat watching her fall into a drowse, for Aunt Plenty's cordial made her sleepy.
She lay so several hours for the drowse deepened into a heavy sleep, and Uncle Alec, still at his post, saw with growing anxiety that a feverish colour began to burn in her cheeks, that her breathing was quick and uneven, and now and then she gave a little moan, as if in pain.
Packed here into three lines of traditional poetic diction are a number of traditional ideas and images of poetry: that it derives from the inspiration of a Muse, that it 'awakes' at night when the rational faculty drowses, that it involves a flight of imagination or 'Fancy' away from quotidian reality to a self-contained poetic world.
Phideaux drowses in a corner of the rude cabin, as inconspicuous as a dust bunny.