drowsing


Also found in: Thesaurus.

drowse

 (drouz)
v. drowsed, drows·ing, drows·es
v.intr.
To be half-asleep: drowsed in the warm sun.
v.tr.
1. To make drowsy: "drowsed with the fume of poppies" (John Keats).
2. To pass (time) by drowsing.
n.
The condition of being sleepy.

[Perhaps ultimately from Old English drūsian, to sink, be sluggish; see dhreu- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.drowsing - half asleep; "made drowsy by the long ride"; "it seemed a pity to disturb the drowsing (or dozing) professor"; "a tired dozy child"; "the nodding (or napping) grandmother in her rocking chair"
asleep - in a state of sleep; "were all asleep when the phone rang"; "fell asleep at the wheel"
References in classic literature ?
The young chap in charge was drowsing at his table.
The balmy sum- mer air, the restful quiet, the odor of the flowers, and the drowsing murmur of the bees had had their effect, and she was nodding over her knit- ting -- for she had no company but the cat, and it was asleep in her lap.
And sure enough, afloat on the placid sea a league away, lay a great city, with its towers and domes and steeples drowsing in a golden mist of sunset.
The porter was drowsing on his bench within the lodge, but at the knock he roused himself and, opening the wicket, came hobbling forth and greeted the Knight, while a tame starling that hung in a wicker cage within piped out, "
The woman, completely wrapped up and covered with snow, sat drowsing and bumping at the back.
After dinner Alexander came back to the wet deck, piled his damp rugs over him again, and sat smoking, losing himself in the obliterating blackness and drowsing in the rush of the gale.
Here we had carried many loads of gravel from the creek-bed, so that it was dry and warm, a pleasant basking place; and here, one afternoon, I was drowsing, half asleep, over a volume of Mendenhall.
Mebbe I was drowsing, with Seth running the engine; but he slammed on the brakes so sudden hard that I darn near went through the cab window.
It's difficult to reconcile the drowsing Clumber with the eager hunter, bouncing through the brush with typical upland dog enthusiasm, but show up with a gun and shell vest and there is a transformation not seen since Clark Kent first took off his shirt in a phone booth.
Oh take pity, child, before this breast / where many time, a drowsing baby, you would feed / and with soft gums sucked in the milk that made you strong" (896-8).
The Practical Napper" is a choice pick for those who want to justify their drowsing off as productive.
Coming upon Vermeer's A Maid Asleep, depicting a servant-girl drowsing at a table laden with fruit, a wine-glass lying on its side, a painting of Cupid on the wall above, and an empty chair half-swung towards a door half-open, implying the recent departure of a male companion, Moretti--reading the image as a depiction, in Hegel's phrase, of the 'prose of everyday life'--exclaimed: 'That is the beginning of the novel.