drudgery


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Related to drudgery: desiderata

drudg·er·y

 (drŭj′ə-rē)
n. pl. drudg·er·ies
Tedious, menial, or unpleasant work. See Synonyms at work.

drudgery

(ˈdrʌdʒərɪ)
n, pl -eries
hard, menial, and monotonous work

drudg•er•y

(ˈdrʌdʒ ə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
menial, distasteful, dull, or hard work.
[1540–50]
syn: See work.

drudgery

dull, laborious, or menial work. — drudge, n.
See also: Work
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drudgery - hard monotonous routine workdrudgery - hard monotonous routine work  
toil, labor, labour - productive work (especially physical work done for wages); "his labor did not require a great deal of skill"

drudgery

noun labour, grind (informal), sweat (informal), hard work, slavery, chore, fag (informal), toil, slog, donkey-work, sweated labour, menial labour, skivvying (Brit.) the drudgery of everyday life

drudgery

noun
Physical exertion that is usually difficult and exhausting:
Informal: sweat.
Chiefly British: fag.
Idiom: sweat of one's brow.
Translations
كَدْح، عَمَل شاق
dřina
slavearbejdeslid og slæb
púl, òrældómur
angaryasıkıcı iş

drudgery

[ˈdrʌdʒərɪ] Ntrabajo m pesado
to take the drudgery out of workhacer el trabajo menos pesado

drudgery

[ˈdrʌdʒəri] ncorvée f

drudgery

nstumpfsinnige Plackerei or Schufterei (inf); it’s sheer drudgeryes ist eine einzige Plackerei

drudgery

[ˈdrʌdʒrɪ] nfatica
housework is sheer drudgery → sbrigare le faccende domestiche è un lavoro pesante e ingrato

drudge

(dradʒ) verb
to do dull, very hard or humble work.
noun
a person who does such work.
ˈdrudgery noun
hard or humble work.
References in classic literature ?
And now consider that in each of my little free communities there would be a machine which would wash and dry the dishes, and do it, not merely to the eye and the touch, but scientifically--sterilizing them--and do it at a saving of all the drudgery and nine-tenths of the time
George was taken home, and put to the meanest drudgery of the farm.
But these solemn lessons which succeeded those, I remember as the death-blow of my peace, and a grievous daily drudgery and misery.
Again I claim exemption in this wandering history from all such descriptive drudgery upon second, third, and fourth dramatis personsonae as your thorough-going novelist must undertake with a good grace.
Then fetching from a cupboard a stoup of wine and two flagons, she placed them on the table, and said in a tone rather asserting a fact than asking a question, ``Thou art Saxon, father Deny it not,'' she continued, observing that Cedric hastened not to reply; ``the sounds of my native language are sweet to mine ears, though seldom heard save from the tongues of the wretched and degraded serfs on whom the proud Normans impose the meanest drudgery of this dwelling.
And you, as an artist, can tell me that at present great artists invariably do starve, except when they are kept alive by charity, private fortune, or some drudgery which hinders them in the pursuit of their vocation.
That my health was much impaired, by the continual drudgery of entertaining the rabble every hour of the day; and that, if my master had not thought my life in danger, her majesty would not have got so cheap a bargain.
He said, too, that to go on, mind, hand, pen always restricted to writing upon one single subject, and speaking through the mouths of a few characters, was intolerable drudgery, the result of which was never equal to the author's labour, and that to avoid this he had in the First Part availed himself of the device of novels, like "The Ill-advised Curiosity," and "The Captive Captain," which stand, as it were, apart from the story; the others are given there being incidents which occurred to Don Quixote himself and could not be omitted.
These are under command, and bound to do every duty required of them connected with the service; such as hunting, trapping, loading and unloading the horses, mounting guard; and, in short, all the drudgery of the camp.
It is sad, however, that you should be brought up in ignorance of the most ordinary branches of education; had you known something of history and grammar you might, by degrees, have relinquished your lace-mending drudgery, and risen in the world.
The slaves are well treated while in good health, but occupied in all kinds of drudgery.
And, if not too tired with her drudgery, or wor- ried beyond endurance by her father, she would laugh at him with a blush, and say: "That's all right, Captain Hagberd; I am not impatient.