drunkard


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drunk·ard

 (drŭng′kərd)
n.
One who is habitually drunk.

drunkard

(ˈdrʌŋkəd)
n
a person who is frequently or habitually drunk

drunk•ard

(ˈdrʌŋ kərd)

n.
a person who is habitually drunk.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drunkard - a chronic drinkerdrunkard - a chronic drinker      
alcoholic, alky, boozer, dipsomaniac, lush, souse, soaker - a person who drinks alcohol to excess habitually
imbiber, juicer, toper, drinker - a person who drinks alcoholic beverages (especially to excess)

drunkard

noun drunk, alcoholic, soak (slang), drinker, lush (slang), carouser, sot, tippler, toper, wino (informal), dipsomaniac Although he liked a drink, he was never a drunkard.

drunkard

noun
A person who is habitually drunk:
Translations
سِكّير
alkoholikopilec
drukkenbolt
pijanacpijanica
részegesiszákoskorhely
fyllibytta, alkóhólisti

drunkard

[ˈdrʌŋkəd] Nborracho/a m/f

drunkard

[ˈdrʌŋkərd] nivrogne mfdrunk driver n (mainly US)conducteur/trice m/f en état d'ivressedrunk driving n (mainly US)conduite f en état d'ivresse
to be accused of drunk driving → être accusé(e) d'avoir conduit en état d'ivresse

drunkard

nTrinker(in) m(f), → Säufer(in) m(f) (inf)

drunkard

[ˈdrʌŋkəd] nbeone/a, ubriacone/a

drunk

(draŋk) verb
see drink.
adjective
overcome by having too much alcohol. A drunk man fell off the bus; drunk with success.
noun
a drunk person, especially one who is often drunk.
ˈdrunkard (-kəd) noun
a person who is often drunk. I'm afraid he's turning into a drunkard.
ˈdrunken adjective
1. drunk. drunken soldiers.
2. caused by being drunk. a drunken sleep.
drunken ˈdriving noun
(also drunk driving) driving under the influence of alcohol.
ˈdrunkenness noun
References in classic literature ?
Behind Ed Griffith's saloon old Jerry Bird the town drunkard lay asleep on the ground.
And the fellow will drink when he can get an opportunity; your drinking Indian always learns to walk with a wider toe than the natural savage, it being the gift of a drunkard to straddle, whether of white or red skin.
And so," she said, "here we are, ruined in the prime of our youth and strength, you by a drunkard, and I by a fool; it is very hard.
Shortly Tom came upon the juvenile pariah of the village, Huckleberry Finn, son of the town drunkard.
Plummer was a miserable drunkard, a profane swearer, and a savage monster.
By that time, I was staggering on the kitchen floor like a little drunkard, through having been newly set upon my feet, and through having been fast asleep, and through waking in the heat and lights and noise of tongues.
So he hastened his steps lest he should meet some one on his way to the mosque, who, seeing his condition, would send him to prison as a drunkard.
Of Alexander, whose deeds won him the name of Great, they say that he was somewhat of a drunkard.
when the animal spirits seemed utterly in abeyance) to that species of energetic concision--that abrupt, weighty, unhurried, and hollow-sounding enunciation--that leaden, self- balanced and perfectly modulated guttural utterance, which may be observed in the lost drunkard, or the irreclaimable eater of opium, during the periods of his most intense excitement.
I do not suppose that, when a drunkard reasons with himself upon his vice, he is once out of five hundred times affected by the dangers that he runs through his brutish, physical insensibility; neither had I, long as I had considered my position, made enough allowance for the complete moral insensibility and insensate readiness to evil, which were the leading characters of Edward Hyde.
John was no drunkard, though he could at times exceed; and the picture of Houston drinking neat spirits at his hall-table struck him with something like disgust.
I shall get nothing from these fools," he muttered; "and I am very much afraid of being here between a drunkard and a coward.