dry up


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Related to dry up: fill up, dry off, dry out, dried out

dry

 (drī)
adj. dri·er (drī′ər), dri·est (drī′ĭst) or dry·er or dry·est
1. Free from liquid or moisture: changed to dry clothes.
2.
a. Having or characterized by little or no rain: a dry climate.
b. Marked by the absence of natural or normal moisture: a dry month.
3.
a. Not under water: dry land.
b. Having all the water or liquid drained away, evaporated, or exhausted: a dry river.
4.
a. No longer yielding liquid, especially milk: a dry cow.
b. Not producing a liquid substance that is normally produced: dry heaves.
c. Not shedding tears: dry sobs.
d. Needing moisture or drink: a dry mouth.
5. No longer wet: The paint is dry.
6. Of or relating to solid rather than liquid substances or commodities: dry weight.
7. Not sweet as a result of the decomposition of sugar during fermentation. Used of wines.
8. Having a large proportion of strong liquor to other ingredients: a dry martini.
9. Eaten or served without butter, gravy, or other garnish: dry toast; dry meat.
10. Having no adornment or coloration; plain: the dry facts.
11. Devoid of bias or personal concern: presented a dry critique.
12.
a. Lacking tenderness, warmth, or involvement; severe: The actor gave a dry reading of the lines.
b. Matter-of-fact or indifferent in manner: rattled off the facts in a dry mechanical tone.
13. Wearisome; dull: a dry lecture filled with trivial details.
14. Humorous in an understated or unemotional way: dry wit.
15. Prohibiting or opposed to the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages: a dry county.
16. Unproductive of the expected results: a mind dry of new ideas.
17. Constructed without mortar or cement: dry masonry.
v. dried (drīd), dry·ing, dries (drīz)
v.tr.
1. To remove the moisture from; make dry: laundry dried by the sun.
2. To preserve (meat or other foods, for example) by extracting the moisture.
v.intr.
To become dry: The sheets dried quickly in the sun.
n. pl. drys Informal
A prohibitionist.
Phrasal Verbs:
dry out Informal
To undergo a cure for alcoholism.
dry up
1. To make or become unproductive, especially to do so gradually.
2. Informal To stop talking. Used especially in the imperative.

[Middle English drie, from Old English drȳge.]

dry′ly, dri′ly adv.
dry′ness n.
Synonyms: dry, dehydrate, desiccate, parch
These verbs mean to remove the moisture from: drying the dishes; added water to eggs that were dehydrated; a factory where coconut meat is shredded and desiccated; land parched by the sun. See Also Synonyms at sour.
Antonym: moisten

dry up

vb (adverb)
1. (intr) to become barren or unproductive; fail: in middle age his inspiration dried up.
2. to dry (dishes, cutlery, etc) with a tea towel after they have been washed
3. (intr) informal to stop talking or speaking: when I got on the stage I just dried up; dry up!.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.dry up - lose water or moisture; "In the desert, you get dehydrated very quickly"
dry, dry out - remove the moisture from and make dry; "dry clothes"; "dry hair"
2.dry up - dry up and shrivel due to complete loss of moisture; "a mummified body was found"
shrink, shrivel, shrivel up, wither - wither, as with a loss of moisture; "The fruit dried and shriveled"
mummify - remove the organs and dry out (a dead body) in order to preserve it; "Th Egyptians mummified their pharaohs"

dry

adjective
1. Having little or no liquid or moisture:
2. Having little or no precipitation:
3. Disagreeable to the sense of hearing:
4. Needing or desiring drink:
Archaic: athirst.
5. Having a taste characteristic of that produced by acids:
6. Without addition, decoration, or qualification:
7. With little or no emotion or expression:
verb
1. To make or become free of moisture.Also used with out:
2. To make or become physically hard:
phrasal verb
dry up
1. To make or become no longer fresh or shapely because of loss of moisture:
2. To make or become no longer active or productive:
Translations
يَجِفُّيُجَفِّف، يُنَشِّفيُنَشِّفُ الكَلامُ لَدَيْهِيَنْضُبُ، يُنَشِّفُ، يُسْتَنْفَذُ
vypotřebovatvyschnoutvysušitztratit řeč
løbe udtørreudtørre
felszárítkiszárad
klárastòorna uppòurrkareka í vörîurnar
stratiť rečvyschnúť
kurumakkurutmakne söyleyeceğini unutmaktükenmek

w>dry up

vi
(stream, well)austrocknen, versiegen; (moisture)trocknen; (inspiration, source of income)versiegen; (author)keine Ideen mehr haben; then business started drying updann wurden die Aufträge immer spärlicher
(= dry dishes)abtrocknen
(actor)stecken bleiben (inf); (speaker)den Faden verlieren
(inf: = be quiet) dry up!halt den Mund! (inf)
vt sep messaufwischen; dishesabtrocknen; (sun) well, river bedaustrocknen

dry

(drai) adjective
1. having little, or no, moisture, sap, rain etc. The ground is very dry; The leaves are dry and withered; I need to find dry socks for the children.
2. uninteresting and not lively. a very dry book.
3. (of humour or manner) quiet, restrained. a dry wit.
4. (of wine) not sweet.
verbpast tense, past participle dried
to (cause to) become dry. I prefer drying dishes to washing them; The clothes dried quickly in the sun.
dried adjective
(of food) having had moisture removed for the purpose of preservation. dried flowers; dried fruit.
ˈdrier, ˈdryer noun
a machine etc that dries. a spin-drier; a hair-dryer.
ˈdrily, ˈdryly adverb
in a quiet, restrained (and humorous) manner. He commented drily on the untidiness of the room.
ˈdryness noun
ˌdry-ˈclean verb
to clean (clothes etc) with chemicals, not with water.
dry land
the land as opposed to the sea etc.
dry off
to make or become completely dry. She climbed out of the swimming-pool and dried off in the sun.
dry up
1. to lose water; to cease running etc completely. All the rivers dried up in the heat.
2. to become used up. Supplies of bandages have dried up.
3. to make dry. The sun dried up the puddles in the road.
4. (of a speaker) to forget what he is going to say. He dried up in the middle of his speech.
References in periodicals archive ?
A few years later, after seeing his string of hits dry up, Darin embraced folk-rock, enjoying a Top 10 cover of Tim Hardin's ``If I Were a Carpenter.
Gilliland says that in the first year of the patent she watched her growing bean market dry up.
She said that at first no one would know, but slowly the earth would dry up and there would be no more blood in it and things would no longer grow from it because there would be no moisture.