drysuit

(redirected from dry-suit)

dry·suit

 (drī′so͞ot′)
n.
A garment made of impermeable material, usually rubber, and sealed against leakage to keep the body warm and dry in cold water, used especially in scuba diving and watersports.

drysuit

(ˈdraɪsuːt) or

dry-suit

n
(Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) a suit worn by divers to keep them warm and dry
Translations

drysuit

dry-suit [ˈdraɪsuːt] ncombinaison f de plongée
References in periodicals archive ?
We cut away his dry-suit and began trying to resuscitate him with the help of the ambulance crew.
Stonydelph's Coun Steve Pritchard also made use of his dry-suit and diving training to wade into the lakes on the watery waste hunt.
The jackets feature hoods with three way adjustment for maximum vision yet minimum exposure, as well as cuffs and closures which promise near dry-suit performance.
Chris Lambert, working with the Tynemouth Volunteer Lifeboat Brigade, said the woman who died was thought to have been wearing a dry-suit and a buoyancy aid.
Regrettably, I had opted to leave my dry-suit underliner hanging in the paraloft, because I didn't want to get too warm in flight.
Candidates must break through ice-entrusted waters, jump in without the protection of their dry-suit, tread water for three to four minutes, pull themselves out of the water, then dry their clothes and gear off.
British polar explorer Ben Saunders immersed in the Serpentine at Hyde Park, in a specially-designed dry-suit which he will take with him when he attempts to become the first and youngest person to cross the Arctic Ocean solo
One of the other classes offered, the Advanced Open Water Class (with five dives), concentrates on dry-suit buoyancy skills, underwater navigation, marine life identification, deep diving, and search and recovery.
I wear one under my wetsuit or dry-suit for extra insulation.
Circulation in my feet was cut off because the dry-suit booties were too small.
Constable Colin Samuel, of the police underwater unit based at Preston, a diving instructor called to give expert evidence, said he believed it would have been better if the two novices had first trained in dry-suit orientation, preferably in a swimming pool.
You'll need nothing quite so unflattering as a dry-suit if you fancy trying your hand at another kind of diving - skydiving.