dualism


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du·al·ism

 (do͞o′ə-lĭz′əm, dyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The condition of being double; duality.
2. Philosophy The view that the world consists of or is explicable as two fundamental entities, such as mind and matter.
3. Psychology The view that mental and physical properties are fundamentally different and that neither can be explained fully in terms of the other.
4. Theology
a. The concept that the world is ruled by the antagonistic forces of good and evil.
b. The concept that humans have two basic natures, the physical and the spiritual.

du′al·ist n.
du′al·is′tic adj.
du′al·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

dualism

(ˈdjuːəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. the state of being twofold or double
2. (Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine, as opposed to idealism and materialism, that reality consists of two basic types of substance usually taken to be mind and matter or two basic types of entity, mental and physical. Compare monism
3. (Theology)
a. the theory that the universe has been ruled from its origins by two conflicting powers, one good and one evil, both existing as equally ultimate first causes
b. the theory that there are two personalities, one human and one divine, in Christ
ˈdualist n
ˌdualˈistic adj
ˌdualˈistically adv

du•al•ism

(ˈdu əˌlɪz əm, ˈdyu-)

n.
1. the state of being dual or consisting of two parts; division into two.
2.
a. (in metaphysics) any of various theories holding that reality is composed of two mutually irreducible substances. Compare monism (def. 1a), pluralism (def. 1a).
b. (in epistemology) the view that substances are either material or mental.
3.
a. the theological doctrine that there are two eternal principles, one good and one evil.
b. the belief that humans embody two parts, as body and soul.
[1785–95]
du′al•ist, n., adj.

dualism

1. any theory in any field of philosophical investigation that reduces the variety of its subject matter to two irreducible principles, as good/evil or natural/supernatural.
2. Metaphysics. any system that reduces the whole universe to two principles, as the Platonic Ideas and Matter. Cf. monism, pluralism.dualist, n.dualistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
Theology. 1. the doctrine of two independent divine beings or eternal principles, one good and the other evil.
2. the belief that man embodies two parts, as body or soul. — dualist, n. — dualistic, adj.
See also: Religion

dualism

Any theory which distinguishes between two fundamentally different things, such as good and evil, mind and matter, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dualism - the doctrine that reality consists of two basic opposing elements, often taken to be mind and matter (or mind and body), or good and evil
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations
dualizam

dualism

[ˈdjʊəlɪzəm] Ndualismo m

dualism

nDualismus m

dualism

[ˈdjuːəlɪzəm] ndualismo
References in classic literature ?
It changed after the publication of his "Psychology," in consequence of his abandoning the dualism of thought and things.
This scheme, with all its magnificent artificiality, James held on to until the end, simply dropping the term consciousness and the dualism between the thought and an external reality"(p.
Dunlap's view is that there is a dualism of subject and object, but that the subject can never become object, and therefore there is no awareness of an awareness.
He suggests that it was a mere inconsistency on James's part to adhere to introspection after abandoning the dualism of thoughts and things.
It supposes dualism and not unity in nature and consciousness.
This strange dualism he had developed was after all very unstable, and, as he sat in his study and meditated, he saw that it could not endure.
recommend dualism as 'a strength and not a weakness' (Willmott 1995: 14).
The polemical target of all the works which Patterson discusses is dualism in its various philosophical and gnostic forms; this is true even of the Symposium, whose advocacy of chastity Patterson shows to be set in an anti-dualist theological framework, rejecting the view that chastity is to be embraced in response to the inherently evil character of embodied existence.
According to the bishops, the program has a "fundamentalist framework" and "cosmological dualism.
Lund ends with a consideration of the prospects for the mind-body problem, and a brief examination and defence of interactionist dualism.
In their companion volume to the latest revision of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Maxmen and Ward maintain that symptoms can emerge and affect both the mind and the brain; thus Cartesian dualism continues into 1995.
4) has confused it with the concept of dualism or a split personality--another popular simplification to the word "schizoid.