dug


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dug 1

 (dŭg)
n.
An udder, breast, or teat of a female animal.

[Origin unknown.]

dug 2

 (dŭg)
v.
Past tense and past participle of dig.

dug

(dʌɡ)
vb
the past tense and past participle of dig

dug

(dʌɡ)
n
1. (Anatomy) the nipple, teat, udder, or breast of a female mammal
2. a human breast, esp when old and withered
[C16: of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish dægge to coddle, Gothic daddjan to give suck]

dug

(dʌɡ)
n
(Animals) a Scot word for dog

dug1

(dʌg)

v.
a pt. and pp. of dig.

dug2

(dʌg)

n.
the mamma or the nipple of a female mammal.
[1520–30; perhaps < a Germanic base akin to Dan dægge, Swedish dägga to suckle]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dug - an udder or breast or teat
female mammal - animals that nourish their young with milk
mammary gland, mamma - milk-secreting organ of female mammals
Translations

dug

2 [dʌg] N (Zool) → teta f, ubre f

dug

1
n (of animal)Zitze f

dig

(dig) present participle ˈdigging: past tense, past participle dug (dag) verb
1. to turn up (earth) with a spade etc. to dig the garden.
2. to make (a hole) in this way. The child dug a tunnel in the sand.
3. to poke. He dug his brother in the ribs with his elbow.
noun
a poke. a dig in the ribs; I knew that his remarks about women drivers were a dig at me (= a joke directed at me).
ˈdigger noun
a machine for digging.
dig out
1. to get out by digging. We had to dig the car out of the mud.
2. to find by searching. I'll see if I can dig out that photo.
dig up
We dug up that old tree; They dug up a skeleton; They're digging up the road yet again.
References in classic literature ?
Laurie dug a grave under the ferns in the grove, little Pip was laid in, with many tears by his tender-hearted mistress, and covered with moss, while a wreath of violets and chickweed was hung on the stone which bore his epitaph, composed by Jo while she struggled with the dinner.
Great ditches had to be dug and thousands of tile laid.
Maybe you're thinking of joining forces with the professor again, as you did when you dug the big tunnel.
It was dug out under the wing of the house, was plastered and cemented, with a stairway and an outside door by which the men came and went.
Did Magua say that the hatchet was out of the ground, and that his hand had dug it up?
Then the floor is scratched and gouged and splintered, the plaster itself is dug out here and there, and this great heavy bed which is all we found in the room, looks as if it had been through the wars.
He therefore dug his cellar, and laid the deep foundations of his mansion, on the square of earth whence Matthew Maule, forty years before, had first swept away the fallen leaves.
He was now known to be a man of skill; it was observed that he gathered herbs and the blossoms of wild-flowers, and dug up roots and plucked off twigs from the forest-trees like one acquainted with hidden virtues in what was valueless to common eyes.
For amber, though at times found on the sea-coast, is also dug up in some far inland soils, whereas ambergris is never found except upon the sea.
The time went on, and the sun was very hot; the flies swarmed round me and settled on my bleeding flanks where the spurs had dug in.
Where they once dug for money, But never found any; Where sometimes Martial Miles Singly files, And Elijah Wood, I fear for no good: No other man, Save Elisha Dugan-- O man of wild habits, Partridges and rabbits Who hast no cares Only to set snares, Who liv'st all alone, Close to the bone And where life is sweetest Constantly eatest.
But that men fear him for that he hath the storms and the lightnings and all the devils that be in hell at his beck and call, they would have dug his en- trails out these many years ago to get at that tale and squelch it.