dug


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dug 1

 (dŭg)
n.
An udder, breast, or teat of a female animal.

[Origin unknown.]

dug 2

 (dŭg)
v.
Past tense and past participle of dig.

dug

(dʌɡ)
vb
the past tense and past participle of dig

dug

(dʌɡ)
n
1. (Anatomy) the nipple, teat, udder, or breast of a female mammal
2. a human breast, esp when old and withered
[C16: of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish dægge to coddle, Gothic daddjan to give suck]

dug

(dʌɡ)
n
(Animals) a Scot word for dog

dug1

(dʌg)

v.
a pt. and pp. of dig.

dug2

(dʌg)

n.
the mamma or the nipple of a female mammal.
[1520–30; perhaps < a Germanic base akin to Dan dægge, Swedish dägga to suckle]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dug - an udder or breast or teat
female mammal - animals that nourish their young with milk
mammary gland, mamma - milk-secreting organ of female mammals
Translations

dug

2 [dʌg] N (Zool) → teta f, ubre f

dug

1
n (of animal)Zitze f

dig

(dig) present participle ˈdigging: past tense, past participle dug (dag) verb
1. to turn up (earth) with a spade etc. to dig the garden.
2. to make (a hole) in this way. The child dug a tunnel in the sand.
3. to poke. He dug his brother in the ribs with his elbow.
noun
a poke. a dig in the ribs; I knew that his remarks about women drivers were a dig at me (= a joke directed at me).
ˈdigger noun
a machine for digging.
dig out
1. to get out by digging. We had to dig the car out of the mud.
2. to find by searching. I'll see if I can dig out that photo.
dig up
We dug up that old tree; They dug up a skeleton; They're digging up the road yet again.
References in classic literature ?
Why, look at one of them prisoners in the bottom dungeon of the Castle Deef, in the harbor of Marseilles, that dug himself out that way; how long was HE at it, you reckon?
But there's one thing, anyway -- Jim's too old to be dug out with a case-knife.
He went up to the place where he had dug the hole and buried the gold pieces.
A robber, who had noticed this, went and dug up the gold and decamped with it.
She searched about until she found a rather sharp piece of wood and knelt down and dug and weeded out the weeds and grass until she made nice little clear places around them.
By-and-by he dug so close to her that the fire-beams were reflected as distinctly from the steel prongs of his fork as from her own.
He turned his head, dug with his hand through the snow about him and opened his eyes.
The diggers dug all through the short night by flaring pipes of gas, and on a level with the early sun, and deeper and deeper below it as it rose into its zenith, and aslant of it as it declined, and on a level with it again as it departed.
Then they rode downhill and uphill, across a ryefield trodden and beaten down as if by hail, following a track freshly made by the artillery over the furrows of the plowed land, and reached some fleches* which were still being dug.
And it would dig and lay, and continue to dig and lay, while a black dug out its eggs within two or three feet of it.
There he had dug quite a deep hole for dog darnel; and had set a mole trap.
Was it not by chance he caused the earth to be dug up?